HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Beer Sommelier
A beer sommelier, also called a cicerone, [1]is a trained professional who works in the hospitality and alcoholic beverage industry specializing in the service and knowledge of beer. The knowledge required for certification includes an understanding of styles, brewing, ingredients, history of beer and brewing, glassware, beer service, draught systems, beer tasting and food pairings.[2] The profession is relatively new but growing.[3]Contents1 Description 2 Education and certification 3 Beer
Beer
tasting 4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] The work of a beer sommelier is varied due to its infancy and the broadness of the beer and brewing industry. Typically people who qualify through one of the accreditation schemes, work in the hospitality industry and will have responsibility for choosing and purchasing beer, oversee its correct storage and service, attend customers and educate staff
[...More...]

"Beer Sommelier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hospitality
Hospitality
Hospitality
refers to the relationship between a guest and a host, wherein the host receives the guest with goodwill, including the reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or strangers. Louis, chevalier de Jaucourt describes hospitality in the Encyclopédie as the virtue of a great soul that cares for the whole universe through the ties of humanity.[4] Hospitality
Hospitality
ethics is a discipline that studies this usage of hospitality.Contents1 Etymology 2 Historical practice 3 Global concepts3.1 Ancient Greece 3.2 India
India
and Nepal 3.3 Judaism 3.4 Christianity 3.5 Pashtun 3.6 Celtic cultures4 Current usage4.1 Anthropology of hospitality5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingEtymology[edit] Derives from the Latin hospes,[5] meaning "host", "guest", or "stranger"
[...More...]

"Hospitality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Non-profit
A non-profit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity[1] or non-profit institution,[2] is dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a shared point of view. In economic terms, it is an organization that uses its surplus of the revenues to further achieve its ultimate objective, rather than distributing its income to the organization's shareholders, leaders, or members. Non-profits are tax exempt or charitable, meaning they do not pay income tax on the money that they receive for their organization. They can operate in religious, scientific, research, or educational settings. The key aspects of nonprofits is accountability, trustworthiness, honesty, and openness to every person who has invested time, money, and faith into the organization. Nonprofit organizations are accountable to the donors, funders, volunteers, program recipients, and the public community
[...More...]

"Non-profit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Drinkware
This list of glassware[1] includes drinking vessels (drinkware) and tableware used to set a table for eating a meal, general glass items such as vases, and glasses used in the catering industry
[...More...]

"Drinkware" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tomato Juice
Tomato
Tomato
juice is a juice made from tomatoes, usually used as a beverage, either plain or in cocktails such as a Bloody Mary or Michelada. In Canada, tomato juice is unconcentrated and pasteurized, made from fine tomato pulp from ripe and whole tomatoes. The stems and skins must be removed without adding water to the final juice product. It may also contain a sweetening agent, citric acid, and salt.[1]Contents1 History 2 Production 3 Uses 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Tomato
Tomato
juice was first served as a beverage in 1917 by Louis Perrin at the French Lick Springs Hotel in southern Indiana, when he ran out of orange juice and needed a quick substitute. His combination of squeezed tomatoes, sugar and his special sauce became an instant success as Chicago businessmen spread the word about the tomato juice cocktail.[2][3] Production[edit] Many commercial manufacturers of tomato juice also add salt
[...More...]

"Tomato Juice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Soda Pop
A soft drink (see terminology for other names) is a drink that typically contains carbonated water (although some lemonades are not carbonated), a sweetener, and a natural or artificial flavoring. The sweetener may be sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, fruit juice, sugar substitutes (in the case of diet drinks), or some combination of these. Soft drinks may also contain caffeine, colorings, preservatives, and other ingredients. Soft drinks are called "soft" in contrast with "hard" alcoholic beverages. Small amounts of alcohol may be present in a soft drink, but the alcohol content must be less than 0.5% of the total volume[1][2] if the drink is to be considered non-alcoholic.[3] Fruit punch, tea, and other such non-alcoholic beverages are technically soft drinks by this definition but are not generally referred to as such. Soft drinks may be served chilled, over ice cubes or at room temperature
[...More...]

"Soda Pop" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grenadine
Grenadine
Grenadine
is a commonly used, non-alcoholic bar syrup, characterized by a flavour that is both tart and sweet, and by a deep red colour
[...More...]

"Grenadine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fruit Juice
Juice
Juice
is a beverage made from the extraction or pressing of the natural liquid contained in fruit and vegetables. It can also refer to liquids that are flavored with concentrate or other biological food sources, such as meat or seafood, such as clam juice. Juice
Juice
is commonly consumed as a beverage or used as an ingredient or flavoring in foods or other beverages, as for smoothies. Juice
Juice
emerged as a popular beverage choice after the development of pasteurization methods enabled its preservation without using fermentation (which is used in wine production).[1] The largest fruit juice consumers are New Zealand (nearly a cup, or 8 ounces, each day) and Colombia
Colombia
(more than three quarters of a cup each day)
[...More...]

"Fruit Juice" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wine
Wine
Wine
(from Latin
Latin
vinum) is an alcoholic beverage made from grapes, generally Vitis
Vitis
vinifera, fermented without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, water, or other nutrients.[1] Yeast consumes the sugar in the grapes and converts it to ethanol and carbon dioxide. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different styles of wine. These variations result from the complex interactions between the biochemical development of the grape, the reactions involved in fermentation, the terroir, and the production process. Many countries enact legal appellations intended to define styles and qualities of wine. These typically restrict the geographical origin and permitted varieties of grapes, as well as other aspects of wine production
[...More...]

"Wine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hard Liquor
A distilled beverage, spirit, liquor, hard liquor or hard alcohol is an alcoholic beverage produced by distillation of liquid drinks made with grains, fruit, or vegetables that have already gone through alcoholic fermentation. The distillation process purifies the liquid and removes diluting components like water, for the purpose of increasing its proportion of alcohol content (commonly expressed as alcohol by volume, ABV).[1] As distilled beverages contain significantly more alcohol, they are considered "harder" – in North America, the term hard liquor is used to distinguish distilled beverages from undistilled ones. As examples, this term does not include beverages such as beer, wine, mead, sake, or cider, as they are fermented but not distilled. These all have a relatively low alcohol content, typically less than 15%. Brandy
Brandy
is a spirit produced by the distillation of wine, and has an ABV of over 35%
[...More...]

"Hard Liquor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alcoholic Beverage
An alcoholic drink, or alcoholic beverage, is a drink that contains alcohol (ethanol), a depressant which in low doses causes euphoria, reduced anxiety, and sociability and in higher doses causes drunkenness, stupor and unconsciousness. Long-term use can lead to alcohol abuse, physical dependence, and alcoholism. Drinking alcohol plays an important social role in many cultures. Most countries have laws regulating the production, sale, and consumption of alcoholic beverages.[1] Some countries ban such activities entirely, but alcoholic drinks are legal in most parts of the world. The global alcoholic drink industry exceeded $1 trillion in 2014.[2] Alcohol
Alcohol
is one of the most widely used recreational drugs in the world
[...More...]

"Alcoholic Beverage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ice Cube
O'Shea Jackson Sr. (born June 15, 1969), known professionally as Ice Cube, is an American rapper and actor
[...More...]

"Ice Cube" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jigger (bartending)
A shot glass is a small glass originally designed to hold or measure spirits or liquor, which is either imbibed straight from the glass ("a shot") or poured into a cocktail ("a drink"). An alcoholic beverage served in a shot glass and typically consumed quickly, in one gulp, may also be known as a "shooter". Shot glasses decorated with a wide variety of toasts, advertisements, humorous pictures, or other decorations and words are popular souvenirs and collectibles, especially as merchandise of a brewery.[1]Contents1 Name origin 2 Earliest shot glasses 3 Sizes 4 Shot-measuring tools4.1 Jigger 4.2 Measuring shot glass5 See also 6 References 7 External linksName origin[edit] The word "shot", meaning a drink of alcohol, has been used since at least the 17th century, while reference to a shot specifically as a small drink of spirits is known in the U.S
[...More...]

"Jigger (bartending)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Arizona Republic
The Arizona
Arizona
Republic is an American daily newspaper published in Phoenix. Circulated throughout Arizona, it is the state's largest newspaper. Since 2000, it has been owned by the Gannett newspaper chain.Former logoContents1 History1.1 Early years 1.2 Pulliam era 1.3 Gannett purchase2 Staff2.1 Don Bolles
Don Bolles
murder3 Political endorsements 4 Sections 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] Early years[edit] The newspaper was founded May 19, 1890, under the name The Arizona Republican.[2] Dwight B. Heard, a Phoenix land and cattle baron, ran the newspaper from 1912 until his death in 1929. The paper was then run by two of its top executives, Charles Stauffer and W. Wesley Knorpp, until it was bought by Midwestern newspaper magnate Eugene C
[...More...]

"The Arizona Republic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.