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Bee Hummingbird
The bee hummingbird, zunzuncito or Helena hummingbird (Mellisuga helenae) is a species of hummingbird which is the world's smallest bird.[2][3]Contents1 Description 2 Diet 3 Habitat and distribution 4 Breeding 5 Coevolution
Coevolution
with flowers 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit] The bee hummingbird is the smallest living bird.[2] Females weigh 2.6 g (0.092 oz) and are 6.1 cm (2.4 in) long, and are slightly larger than males, with an average weight of 1.95 g (0.069 oz) and length of 5.5 cm (2.2 in).[4] As its name suggests, it is scarcely larger than a bee. Like all hummingbirds, it is a swift, strong flier. The male has a green pileum and fiery red throat, iridescent gorget with elongated lateral plumes, bluish upper parts, and the rest of the underparts mostly greyish white.[2][5] The male is smaller than the female
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Cuba
Coordinates: 22°00′N 80°00′W / 22.000°N 80.000°W / 22.000; -80.000Republic of Cuba República de Cuba  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "¡Patria o Muerte, Venceremos!" (Spanish) "Homeland or Death, we shall overcome!"[1]Anthem: La Bayamesa Bayamo
Bayamo
Song [2]Location of  Cuba  (green)Capital and largest city Havana 23°8′N 82°23′W / 23.133°N 82.383°W / 23.133; -82.383Official languages SpanishEthnic groups (2012[3])64.1% White 26.6% Mulatto, Mestizo, Zambo, or Pardo 9.3% Black
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Endemism
Endemism
Endemism
is the ecological state of a species being unique to a defined geographic location, such as an island, nation, country or other defined zone, or habitat type; organisms that are indigenous to a place are not endemic to it if they are also found elsewhere. The extreme opposite of endemism is cosmopolitan distribution. An alternative term for a species that is endemic is precinctive, which applies to species (and subspecific categories) that are restricted to a defined geographical area.Contents1 Etymology 2 Overview 3 Threats to highly endemistic regions 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The word endemic is from New Latin
New Latin
endēmicus, from Greek ενδήμος, endēmos, "native". Endēmos is formed of en meaning "in", and dēmos meaning "the people".[1] The term "precinctive" has been suggested by some scientists,[a] and was first used in botany by MacCaughey in 1917
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Bark (botany)
Bark is the outermost layers of stems and roots of woody plants. Plants with bark include trees, woody vines, and shrubs. Bark refers to all the tissues outside the vascular cambium and is a nontechnical term.[1] It overlays the wood and consists of the inner bark and the outer bark. The inner bark, which in older stems is living tissue, includes the innermost area of the periderm. The outer bark in older stems includes the dead tissue on the surface of the stems, along with parts of the innermost periderm and all the tissues on the outer side of the periderm
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Lichen
A lichen is a composite organism that arises from algae or cyanobacteria living among filaments of multiple fungi[1] in a symbiotic relationship.[2][3][4] The combined lichen has properties different from those of its component organisms. Lichens
Lichens
come in many colours, sizes, and forms. The properties are sometimes plant-like, but lichens are not plants
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Pea
The pea is most commonly the small spherical seed or the seed-pod of the pod fruit Pisum
Pisum
sativum. Each pod contains several peas, which can be green or yellow. Pea
Pea
pods are botanically fruit,[2] since they contain seeds and develop from the ovary of a (pea) flower. The name is also used to describe other edible seeds from the Fabaceae
Fabaceae
such as the pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), the cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), and the seeds from several species of Lathyrus. P. sativum is an annual plant, with a life cycle of one year. It is a cool-season crop grown in many parts of the world; planting can take place from winter to early summer depending on location
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Hamelia Patens
Hamelia patens is a large perennial shrub or small tree in the coffee family, Rubiaceae, that is native to the American subtropics and tropics. Its range extends from Florida in the southern United States to as far south as Argentina.[2] Common names include firebush, hummingbird bush, scarlet bush, and redhead
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Chrysobalanus Icaco
Chrysobalanus icaco, the cocoplum, paradise plum, abajeru or icaco, is found near sea beaches and inland throughout tropical Africa, tropical Americas and the Caribbean, and in southern Florida and the Bahamas.[1] It is also found as an exotic species on other tropical islands, where it has become a problematic invasive.[2] Although taxonomists disagree on whether Chrysobalanus icaco has multiple subspecies or varieties, it is recognized as having two ecotypes, described as an inland, much less salt-tolerant, and more upright C. icaco var. pellocarpus and a coastal C. icaco var. icaco.[3][4] Both the ripe fruit of C. icaco, and the seed inside the ridged shell it contains, are considered edible.[4]Contents1 Description 2 Gallery 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] Chrysobalanus icaco is a shrub 1–3 metres (3.3–9.8 ft), or bushy tree 2–6 metres (6.6–19.7 ft), rarely to 10 metres (33 ft)
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Lysiloma Latisiliquum
Acacia
Acacia
bahamensis (Benth.) Griseb. Acacia
Acacia
latisiliqua (L.) Willd. Leucaena
Leucaena
latisiliqua (L.) Gillis Lysiloma
Lysiloma
bahamense Benth. Mimosa
Mimosa
latisiliqua L. Lysiloma
Lysiloma
latisiliquum, commonly known as false tamarind or wild tamarind, is a species of tree in the pea family, Fabaceae, that is native to southern Florida
Florida
in the United States, The Bahamas, the Caribbean, southern Mexico, and northern Central America.[1] Its wood is sometimes traded as sabicu wood.Wikimedia Commons has media related to Lysiloma
Lysiloma
latisiliquum.References[edit]^ " Lysiloma
Lysiloma
latisiliquum". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN)
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Turnera Ulmifolia
Turnera ulmifolia, the ramgoat dashalong[1] or yellow alder, is a species of plant of family Passifloraceae, native to Mexico and the West Indies. A recent study found that yellow alder potentiated the antibiotic activity against methicillin—resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).[2] Description[edit] Turnera ulmifolia grows erect, with dark toothed leaves and small, yellow-orange flowers, and is often found as a weed growing on roadsides. This plant is commonly misidentified with the closely related T. diffusa in horticultural commerce, causing it to be often misrepresented as "Damiana."[3][4][5] References[edit]^ "Turnera ulmifolia". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 12 December 2015.  ^ Coutinho, Henrique DM; Costa, José GM; Lima, Edeltrudes O; Falcão-Silva, Vivyanne S; Siqueira Júnior, José P (2009)
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Antigonon Leptopus
Antigonon leptopus, commonly known as Mexican creeper, coral vine, bee bush (in most Caribbean islands) or San Miguelito vine, is a species of flowering plant in the buckwheat family, Polygonaceae. It is a perennial that is native to Mexico. It is a vine with pink or white flowers (Antigonon leptopus 'alba' ).Contents1 Invasive species 2 Description 3 Uses 4 References 5 External linksInvasive species[edit] It is listed as a category II invasive exotic by the Florida's pest plant council. Description[edit]HabitAntigonon leptopus is a fast-growing climbing vine that holds via tendrils, and is able to reach 25 ft or more in length
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Tournefortia
Tournefortia, commonly known as soldierbush,[3] is a genus of flowering plants in the borage family, Boraginaceae. It was first published under the name Pittonia by Charles Plumier in 1703, in honour of Joseph Pitton de Tournefort. Later, Carl Linnaeus changed the name to Tournefortia, on the grounds that Tournefort was virtually unknown by his family name outside France.[4] Selected species[edit] The following species are accepted by The Plant
Plant
List:[5] Tournefortia
Tournefortia
acutiflora M.Martens & Galeotti Tournefortia
Tournefortia
acutifolia Willd. Tournefortia
Tournefortia
andina Britton ex Rusby Tournefortia
Tournefortia
andrade-limae J.I.M.Melo Tournefortia
Tournefortia
angustiflora Ruiz & Pav. Tournefortia argentea
Tournefortia argentea
L
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Archipelago
An archipelago (/ɑːrkɪˈpɛləɡoʊ/ ( listen) ark-i-PEL-ə-goh), sometimes called an island group or island chain, is a chain, cluster or collection of islands, or sometimes a sea containing a small number of scattered islands. The word archipelago is derived from the Greek ἄρχι- – arkhi- ("chief") and πέλαγος – pélagos ("sea") through the Italian arcipelago. In Italian, possibly following a tradition of antiquity, the Archipelago
Archipelago
(from medieval Greek *ἀρχιπέλαγος and Latin archipelagus) was the proper name for the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
and, later, usage shifted to refer to the Aegean Islands
Aegean Islands
(since the sea is remarkable for its large number of islands).Contents1 Types 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksTypes[edit] Archipelagos may be found isolated in large amounts of water or neighbouring a large land mass
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Plant Reproduction
Plant
Plant
reproduction is the production of new individuals or offspring in plants, which can be accomplished by sexual or asexual reproduction. Sexual reproduction
Sexual reproduction
produces offspring by the fusion of gametes, resulting in offspring genetically different from the parent or parents. Asexual reproduction
Asexual reproduction
produces new individuals without the fusion of gametes, genetically identical to the parent plants and each other, except when mutations occur
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Isle Of Youth
Coordinates: 21°45′N 82°51′W / 21.750°N 82.850°W / 21.750; -82.850 (Isla de la Juventud)Isla de la JuventudSpecial Municipality of CubaCoat of armsCountry CubaCapital Nueva GeronaArea[1] • Total 2,419 km2 (934 sq mi)Population (December 31, 2010)[1] • Total 86,420 • Density 36/km2 (93/sq mi)Time zone EST (UTC-5)Area code(s) +53-061Satellite image of the islandIsla de la Juventud[2] (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈizla ðe la xuβenˈtuð]; English: Isle of Youth) is the second-largest Cuban island and the seventh-largest island in the West Indies (after Cuba itself, Hispaniola, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, and Andros Island). The island was called the Isle of Pines (Spanish: Isla de Pinos) until 1978. It has an area 2,200 km2 (850 sq mi) and is 50 km (31 mi) south of the island of Cuba, across the Gulf of Batabanó
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West Indies
The West Indies
West Indies
or the Caribbean
Caribbean
Basin is a region of the North Atlantic Ocean
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