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Beauchamp-Feuillet Notation
Beauchamp–Feuillet notation is a system of dance notation used in Baroque dance.eight bars of a dance recorded and published by Feuillet in 1700The notation was commissioned by Louis XIV (who had founded the Académie Royale de Danse
Académie Royale de Danse
in 1661), and devised in the 1680s by Pierre Beauchamp. The notation system was first described in detail in 1700 by Raoul-Auger Feuillet
Raoul-Auger Feuillet
in Chorégraphie. Feuillet also then began a programme of publishing complete notated dances
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Dance Notation
Dance
Dance
notation is the symbolic representation of human dance movement and form, using methods such as graphic symbols and figures, path mapping, numerical systems, and letter and word notations. Several dance notation systems have been invented, many of which are designed to document specific types of dance
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Bourrée
The bourrée (Occitan: borrèia[1]; also in England, borry or bore) is a dance of French origin and the words and music that accompany it.[2] The bourrée somewhat resembles the gavotte, it is in double time and often has a dactylic rhythm but it is somewhat quicker and its phrase starts with a quarter-bar anacrusis or "pick-up" whereas a gavotte has a half-bar anacrusis. In the Baroque era, after the Academie de Dance
Dance
was established by Louis XIV
Louis XIV
in 1661,[3] the French court adapted the bourrée, like many such dances, for the purposes of concert dance. In this way it gave its name to a ballet step[4] characteristic of the dance, a rapid movement of the feet while en pointe or demi-pointe, and so to the sequence of steps called pas de bourrée. The bourrée became an optional movement in the classical suite of dances, and J.S
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Sarabande
The sarabande (from Spanish zarabanda) is a dance in triple metre.Contents1 History 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksHistory[edit] The dance may have been of Mexican origin evolved from a Spanish dance with Arab influences, danced with a lively double line of couples with castanets.[1] A dance called zarabanda is first mentioned in 1539 in Central America
Central America
in the poem Vida y tiempo de Maricastaña, written in
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Ritournelle
The ritournelle is a 17th-century dance in quick triple time.[1] 'Ritournelle' is the French equivalent of the Italian musical term 'Ritornello'[2] References[edit]^ IMSLP ^ Grove, George and Fuller-Maitland, John Alexander (1908), Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians, vol. 4, p.108This dance-related article is a stub
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Rigaudon
The rigaudon (also spelled rigadon, rigadoon) is a French baroque dance with a lively duple metre. The music is similar to that of a bourrée, but the rigaudon is rhythmically simpler with regular phrases (eight measure phrases are most common). It originated as a sprightly 17th-century French folk dance for couples. Traditionally, the folkdance was associated with the provinces of Vavarais, Languedoc, Dauphiné, and Provence
Provence
in southern France, and it became popular as a court dance during the reign of Louis XIV (Little 2001). Its hopping steps were adopted by the skillful dancers of the French and English courts, where it remained fashionable through the 18th century. By the close of the 18th century, however, it had given way in popularity as a ballroom dance (along with the passepied, bourrée, and gigue) to the minuet (Cunningham Woods & 1895–96, 93). Sources[edit]Cunningham Woods, Francis. 1895–96
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Passepied
The passepied (French pronunciation: ​[pasˈpje], "pass-foot", from a characteristic dance step) is a French court dance. Originating as a kind of Breton branle, it was adapted to courtly use in the 16th century and is found frequently in 18th-century French opera and ballet, particularly in pastoral scenes, and latterly also in baroque instrumental suites of dances. In English the passepied has been called "paspy", a phonetic approximation of the French pronunciation.Contents1 History 2 Revivals 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The earliest historical mention of the passepied was by Noël du Fail in 1548, who said it was common at Breton courts. François Rabelais and Thoinot Arbeau, writing later in the 16th century, identify the dance as a type of branle characteristic of Brittany. At this time it was a fast duple-time dance with three-bar phrases, therefore of the branle simple type (Little 2001)
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Minuet
A minuet (/ˌmɪnjuːˈɛt/; also spelled menuet) is a social dance of French origin for two people, usually in 3 4 time
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Loure
The loure, also known as the gigue lente or slow gigue, is a slow French Baroque dance, probably originating in Normandy
Normandy
and named after the sound of the instrument of the same name (a type of musette). The loure is a dance of slow or moderate tempo, sometimes in simple triple meter, more often in compound duple meter. The weight is on the first beat, which is further emphasised by the preceding anacrusis that begins the traditional loure. One of its features is a lilting dotted rhythm. In his Musicalisches Lexicon (Leipzig, 1732), Johann Gottfried Walther wrote that the loure "is slow and ceremonious; the first note of each half-measure is dotted which should be well observed".[1] Examples of loures are found in the works of Lully (e.g., Alceste) and of Bach (e.g.: French Suite No. 5[2] and the Partita No. 3 for violin solo). References[edit]^ Bach. The French Suites: Embellished version. Barenreiter Urtext ^ N
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Gigue
The gigue (/ʒiːɡ/; French pronunciation: ​[ʒiɡ]) or giga (Italian: [ˈdʒiːɡa]) is a lively baroque dance originating from the British jig. It was imported into France in the mid-17th century[2] and usually appears at the end of a suite. The gigue was probably never a court dance, but it was danced by nobility on social occasions and several court composers wrote gigues.[3] A gigue is usually in 3 8 or in one of its compound metre derivatives, such as 6 8, 6 4, 9 8 or 12 8, although there are some gigues written in other metres, as for example the gigue from Johann Sebastian Bach's first French Suite (BWV 812), which is written in 2 2. It often has a contrapuntal texture. It often has accents on the third beats in the bar, making the gigue a lively folk dance. In early French theatre, it was customary to end a play's performance with a gigue, complete with music and dancing.[3] A gigue, like other Baroque dances, consists of two sections
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Gavotte
The gavotte (also gavot, gavote, or gavotta) is a French dance, taking its name from a folk dance of the Gavot, the people of the Pays de Gap region of Dauphiné
Dauphiné
in the southeast of France, where the dance originated according to one source.[1] According to another reference, however, the word "gavotte" is a generic term for a variety of French folk dances, and most likely originated in Lower Brittany
Lower Brittany
in the west, or possibly Provence
Provence
in the southeast or the French Basque Country
French Basque Country
in the southwest of France. It is notated in 4 4 or 2 2 time and is usually of moderate tempo, though the folk dances also use meters such as 9 8 and 5 8.[2] In late 16th-century renaissance dance the gavotte is first mentioned as the last of a suite of branles. Popular at the court of Louis XIV, it became one of many optional dances in the classical suite of dances
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Courante
The courante, corrente, coranto and corant are some of the names given to a family of triple metre dances from the late Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Baroque
Baroque
era. In a Baroque
Baroque
dance suite an Italian or French courante is typically paired with a preceding allemande, making it the second movement of the suite or the third if there is a prelude.Contents1 Types of courante 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksTypes of courante[edit]A courante rhythm.[1] Courante
Courante
literally means "running", and in the later Renaissance
Renaissance
the courante was danced with fast running and jumping steps, as described by Thoinot Arbeau
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Allemande
An allemande (allemanda, almain(e), or alman(d), French: "German (dance)") is a renaissance and baroque dance, and one of the most popular instrumental dance styles in baroque music, with notable examples by Couperin, Purcell, Bach
Bach
and Handel
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Baroque Dance
Baroque
Baroque
dance is dance of the Baroque
Baroque
era (roughly 1600–1750),[1] closely linked with Baroque
Baroque
music, theatre and opera.Contents1 English country dance 2 The French Noble style 3 Theatrical dance 4 Other social dance styles 5 Modern reconstructions 6 References 7 External linksEnglish country dance[edit] Further information: English Country Dance The majority of surviving choreographies from the period are English country dances, such as those in the many editions of Playford's The Dancing Master. Playford only gives the floor patterns of the dances, with no indication of the steps
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John Essex
John Essex
John Essex
(born c.1680 - died 1744, London) was an English dancer, choreographer and author who promoted the recording of dance steps through notation as well as performing in London
London
theatre. In 1728 he published his major work The Dancing-Master, or, The Art of Dancing Explained, a translation of Pierre Rameau's Le maître à danser (1725).Contents1 Life 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] He is first mentioned in record in 1702 as a dancer at Drury Lane Theatre, performing serious and comic dances. In 1703 he left after a dispute with the manager, Christopher Rich. He set up as an independent dance teacher and teacher of music in Rood Lane (off Fenchurch Street) in the parish of St Dionis Backchurch
St Dionis Backchurch
in the City of London.[1][2] He became part of a group of dance teachers who sought to modernise and improve the teaching and record of dancing
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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