HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bearing (navigation)
In navigation BEARING may refer, depending on the context, to any of: (A) the direction or course of motion itself; (B) the direction of a distant object relative to the current course (or the "change" in course that would be needed to get to that distant object); or (C), the angle away from North of a distant point as observed at the current point. Absolute bearing refers to the angle between the magnetic North (magnetic bearing) or true North (true bearing) and an object. For example, an object to the East would have an absolute bearing of 90 degrees. Relative bearing refers to the angle between the craft's forward direction, and the location of another object. For example, an object relative bearing of 0 degrees would be dead ahead; an object relative bearing 180 degrees would be behind. Bearings can be measured in mils or degrees
[...More...]

"Bearing (navigation)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

North Star
POLARIS, designated ALPHA URSAE MINORIS (α Ursae Minoris, abbreviated Alpha UMi, α UMi), commonly the NORTH STAR or POLE STAR, is the brightest star in the constellation of Ursa Minor . It is very close to the north celestial pole , making it the current northern pole star . The revised Hipparcos
Hipparcos
parallax gives a distance to Polaris of about 433 light-years (133 parsecs ), while calculations by other methods derive distances around 30% closer. Polaris
Polaris
is a multiple star , comprising the main star ( Polaris
Polaris
Aa, a yellow supergiant ) in orbit with a smaller companion ( Polaris
Polaris
Ab); the pair in orbit with Polaris
Polaris
B (discovered in August 1779 by William Herschel )
[...More...]

"North Star" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polaris
POLARIS, designated ALPHA URSAE MINORIS (α Ursae Minoris, abbreviated Alpha UMi, α UMi), commonly the NORTH STAR or POLE STAR, is the brightest star in the constellation of Ursa Minor
Ursa Minor
. It is very close to the north celestial pole , making it the current northern pole star . The revised Hipparcos
Hipparcos
parallax gives a distance to Polaris of about 433 light-years (133 parsecs ), while calculations by other methods derive distances around 30% closer. Polaris
Polaris
is a multiple star , comprising the main star ( Polaris
Polaris
Aa, a yellow supergiant ) in orbit with a smaller companion ( Polaris
Polaris
Ab); the pair in orbit with Polaris
Polaris
B (discovered in August 1779 by William Herschel )
[...More...]

"Polaris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Elevation (ballistics)
In ballistics , the ELEVATION is the angle between the horizontal plane and the direction of the barrel of a gun , mortar or heavy artillery . Originally, elevation was a linear measure of how high the gunners had to physically lift the muzzle of a gun up from the gun carriage to hit targets at a certain distance. CONTENTS * 1 Pre-WWI and WWI * 2 WWII and beyond * 3 See also * 4 References PRE-WWI AND WWIThough early 20th-century firearms were relatively easy to fire, artillery was not. Before and during World War I
World War I
, the only way to effectively fire artillery was plotting points on a plane. Most artillery units seldom employed their cannons in small numbers. Instead of using pin-point artillery firing they used old means of "fire for effect " using artillery en masse. This tactic was employed successfully by past armies
[...More...]

"Elevation (ballistics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stellar Navigation
CELESTIAL NAVIGATION, also known as ASTRONAVIGATION, is the ancient science of position fixing that enables a navigator to transition through a space without having to rely on estimated calculations, or dead reckoning , to know their position. Celestial navigation
Celestial navigation
uses "sights," or angular measurements taken between a celestial body (the sun, the moon, a planet or a star) and the visible horizon. The sun is most commonly used, but navigators can also use the moon, a planet, Polaris
Polaris
, or one of 57 other navigational stars whose coordinates are tabulated in the nautical almanac and air almanacs. Celestial navigation
Celestial navigation
is the use of angular measurements (sights) between celestial bodies and the visible horizon to locate one's position on the globe, on land as well as at sea. At a given time, any celestial body is located directly over one point on the Earth's surface
[...More...]

"Stellar Navigation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gyrocompass
A GYROCOMPASS is a type of non-magnetic compass which is based on a fast-spinning disc and the rotation of the Earth
Earth
(or another planetary body if used elsewhere in the universe) to find geographical direction automatically. Although one important component of a gyrocompass is a gyroscope , these are not the same devices; a gyrocompass is built to use the effect of gyroscopic precession , which is a distinctive aspect of the general gyroscopic effect
[...More...]

"Gyrocompass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Clockwise
Rotation
Rotation
can occur in two possible directions. A CLOCKWISE (typically abbreviated as CW) motion is one that proceeds in the same direction as a clock 's hands: from the top to the right, then down and then to the left, and back up to the top. The opposite sense of rotation or revolution is (in North American English ) COUNTERCLOCKWISE (CCW) or (in Commonwealth English ) ANTICLOCKWISE (ACW)
[...More...]

"Clockwise" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Starboard
PORT and STARBOARD are nautical and aeronautical terms for left and right, respectively. Port is the left-hand side of a vessel or aircraft, facing forward. Starboard is the right-hand side, facing forward. Since port and starboard never change, they are unambiguous references that are not relative to the observer. The term starboard derives from the Old English steorbord, meaning the side on which the ship is steered. Before ships had rudders on their centrelines, they were steered with a steering oar at the stern of the ship and, because more people are right-handed , on the right-hand side of it. The term is cognate with the Old Norse stýri (rudder) and borð (side of a ship). Since the steering oar was on the right side of the boat, it would tie up at wharf on the other side. Hence the left side was called port. Formerly, larboard was used instead of port. This is from Middle-English ladebord and the term lade is related to the modern load
[...More...]

"Starboard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Surveying
SURVEYING or LAND SURVEYING is the technique, profession, and science of determining the terrestrial or three-dimensional position of points and the distances and angles between them. A land surveying professional is called a LAND SURVEYOR. These points are usually on the surface of the Earth, and they are often used to establish maps and boundaries for ownership , locations like building corners or the surface location of subsurface features, or other purposes required by government or civil law, such as property sales. Surveyors work with elements of geometry , trigonometry , regression analysis , physics , engineering , metrology , programming languages and the law . They use equipment like total stations , robotic total stations, GPS
GPS
receivers, retroreflectors , 3D scanners , radios, handheld tablets, digital levels, subsurface locators, drones, GIS and surveying software
[...More...]

"Surveying" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geostationary Satellite
A GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT, GEOSTATIONARY EARTH ORBIT or GEOSYNCHRONOUS EQUATORIAL ORBIT (GEO) is a circular orbit 35,786 kilometres (22,236 mi) above the Earth's equator and following the direction of the Earth's rotation. An object in such an orbit has an orbital period equal to the Earth's rotational period (one sidereal day ) and thus appears motionless, at a fixed position in the sky, to ground observers. Communications satellites and weather satellites are often placed in geostationary orbits, so that the satellite antennas (located on Earth
Earth
) that communicate with them do not have to rotate to track them, but can be pointed permanently at the position in the sky where the satellites are located. Using this characteristic, ocean color satellites with visible and near-infrared light sensors (e.g. the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI)) can also be operated in geostationary orbit in order to monitor sensitive changes of ocean environments
[...More...]

"Geostationary Satellite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Circle
A GREAT CIRCLE, also known as an ORTHODROME, of a sphere is the intersection of the sphere and a plane that passes through the center point of the sphere. A great circle is the largest circle that can be drawn on any given sphere. Any diameter of any great circle coincides with a diameter of the sphere, and therefore all great circles have the same center and circumference as each other. This special case of a circle of a sphere is in opposition to a small circle, that is, the intersection of the sphere and a plane that does not pass through the center. Every circle in Euclidean 3-space is a great circle of exactly one sphere. For most pairs of points on the surface of a sphere, there is a unique great circle through the two points. The exception is a pair of antipodal points, for which there are infinitely many great circles. The minor arc of a great circle between two points is the shortest surface-path between them
[...More...]

"Great Circle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal Navy
The ROYAL NAVY (RN) is the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
's naval warfare force . Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the SENIOR SERVICE. From the middle decades of the 17th century and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
Second World War

[...More...]

"Royal Navy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal Australian Navy
The ROYAL AUSTRALIAN NAVY (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force . Following the Federation of Australia
Federation of Australia
in 1901, the ships and resources of the separate colonial navies were integrated into a national force: the COMMONWEALTH NAVAL FORCES. Originally intended for local defence, the navy was granted the title of 'Royal Australian Navy' in 1911, and became increasingly responsible for defence of the region. Britain's Royal Navy
Navy
continued to support the RAN and provided additional blue-water defence capability in the Pacific up to the early years of World War II. Then, rapid wartime expansion saw the acquisition of large surface vessels and the building of many smaller warships. In the decade following the war, the RAN acquired a small number of aircraft carriers, the last of these paying off in 1982
[...More...]

"Royal Australian Navy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ground Track
A GROUND TRACK or GROUND TRACE is the path on the surface of the Earth directly below an aircraft or satellite . In the case of a satellite, it is the projection of the satellite's orbit onto the surface of the Earth (or whatever body the satellite is orbiting). A satellite ground track may be thought of as a path along the Earth's surface which traces the movement of an imaginary line between the satellite and the center of the Earth. In other words, the ground track is the set of points at which the satellite will pass directly overhead, or cross the zenith , in the frame of reference of a ground observer. CONTENTS * 1 Aircraft ground tracks * 2 Satellite ground tracks * 2.1 Direct and retrograde motion * 2.2 Orbital period and ground track * 2.3 Inclination and ground track * 2.4 Argument of perigee and ground track * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links AIRCRAFT GROUND TRACKS THIS SECTION NEEDS EXPANSION. You can help by adding to it
[...More...]

"Ground Track" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.