HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Battle On The Ice Of Lake Vänern
Vänern
Vänern
(Swedish pronunciation: [ˈvɛːnɛɳ]) is the largest lake in Sweden, the largest lake in the European Union
European Union
and the third-largest lake entirely in Europe after Ladoga and Onega in Russia. It is located in the provinces of Västergötland, Dalsland, and Värmland
Värmland
in the southwest of the country.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Environment 4 Fish4.1 Salmon 4.2 Other fish5 Birds 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Geologically, the lake was formed after the Quaternary glaciation about 10,000 years ago; when the ice melted, the entire width of Sweden
Sweden
was covered in water, creating a strait between Kattegat
Kattegat
and the Gulf of Bothnia
[...More...]

"Battle On The Ice Of Lake Vänern" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

6th Century
The 6th century
6th century
is the period from 501
501
to 600
600
in accordance with the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
in the Common Era. In the West, this century marks the end of Classical Antiquity
Classical Antiquity
and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Following the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
late in the previous century, Europe fractured into many small Germanic Kingdoms, which competed fiercely for land and wealth. From this upheaval the Franks
Franks
rose to prominence, and carved out a sizeable domain encompassing much of modern France and Germany
[...More...]

"6th Century" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Amphipoda
Traditional division[2]Gammaridea Caprellidea Hyperiidea IngolfiellideaRevised division (2013)[1]Gammaridea Senticaudata Hyperiidea Ingolfiellidea Amphipoda
Amphipoda
is an order of malacostracan crustaceans with no carapace and generally with laterally compressed bodies. Amphipods range in size from 1 to 340 millimetres (0.0394 to 13.4 in) and are mostly detritivores or scavengers. There are more than 9,900 amphipod species so far described. They are mostly marine animals, but are found in almost all aquatic environments
[...More...]

"Amphipoda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Monoporeia Affinis
Pontoporeia affinis Lindström, 1855 Monoporeia affinis, formerly referred to as Pontoporeia affinis (Greek: Πόντος, póntos = Pontus / Black Sea; πορεία, poreía = to travel), is a small, yellowish benthic amphipod living in the Baltic Sea, the Arctic Sea

[...More...]

"Monoporeia Affinis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Viking Ships
Viking ships
Viking ships
were marine vessels of unique structure , built by the Vikings
Vikings
during the Viking Age. The boat-types were quite varied, depending on what the ship was intended for,[1] but they were generally characterized as being slender and flexible boats, with symmetrical ends with true keel. They were clinker built, which is the overlapping of planks riveted together. Some might have had a dragon's head or other circular object protruding from the bow and stern for design, although this is only inferred from historical sources. Viking ships
Viking ships
were not just used for their military prowess but for long-distance trade, exploration and colonization.[2][dubious – discuss] In the literature, Viking ships
Viking ships
are usually seen divided into two broad categories: merchant ships and warships
[...More...]

"Viking Ships" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Snorri Sturluson
Snorri Sturluson[1] (Icelandic: [ˈsnɔrɪ ˈstʏrtlʏsɔn]; 1179 – 23 September 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet, and politician. He was elected twice as lawspeaker to the Icelandic parliament, the Althing. He was the author of the Prose Edda
Prose Edda
or Younger Edda, which consists of Gylfaginning
Gylfaginning
("the fooling of Gylfi"), a narrative of Norse mythology, the Skáldskaparmál, a book of poetic language, and the Háttatal, a list of verse forms
[...More...]

"Snorri Sturluson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prose Edda
The Prose Edda, also known as the Younger Edda, Snorri's Edda (Icelandic: Snorra Edda) or, historically, simply as Edda, is an Old Norse work of literature written in Iceland
Iceland
in the early 13th century. The work is often assumed to have been written, or at least compiled, by the Icelandic scholar, lawspeaker and historian Snorri Sturluson around the year 1220. It begins with a euhemerized Prologue, a section on the Norse cosmogony, pantheon and myths.[1] This is followed by three distinct books: Gylfaginning
Gylfaginning
(consisting of around 20,000 words), Skáldskaparmál
Skáldskaparmál
(around 50,000 words) and Háttatal (around 20,000 words). Seven manuscripts, dating from around 1300 to around 1600, have independent textual value. Sturluson planned the collection as a textbook
[...More...]

"Prose Edda" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mälaren
Mälaren
Mälaren
(Swedish: [²mɛːlarɛn] ( listen)), historically referred to as Lake Malar in English, is the third-largest freshwater lake in Sweden
Sweden
(after Vänern
Vänern
and Vättern). Its area is 1,140 km² and its greatest depth is 64 m. Mälaren spans 120 kilometers from east to west. The lake drains, from south-west to north-east, into the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
through its natural outlets Norrström
Norrström
and Söderström (as it flows around Stadsholmen island) and through the artificial Södertälje Canal
Södertälje Canal
and Hammarbyleden
Hammarbyleden
waterway. The easternmost bay of Mälaren, in central Stockholm, is called Riddarfjärden. The lake is located in Svealand and bounded by the provinces of Uppland, Södermanland, Närke, and Västmanland
[...More...]

"Mälaren" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gylfi
In Norse mythology, Gylfi, Gylfe, Gylvi, or Gylve was the earliest recorded king in Scandinavia. He often uses the name Gangleri when appearing in disguise. The traditions on Gylfi
Gylfi
deal with how he was tricked by the gods and his relations with the goddess Gefjon.Contents1 The creation of Zealand 2 Meeting the Æsir 3 Other appearances 4 NotesThe creation of Zealand[edit] The Ynglinga saga
Ynglinga saga
section of Snorri's Heimskringla
Heimskringla
and the Eddic poem Ragnarsdrápa
Ragnarsdrápa
tell a legend of how Gylfi
Gylfi
was seduced by the goddess Gefjon
Gefjon
to give her as much land as she could plow in one night
[...More...]

"Gylfi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gefjon
In Norse mythology, Gefjon
Gefjon
(alternatively spelled Gefion or Gefjun) is a goddess associated with ploughing, the Danish island of Zealand, the legendary Swedish king Gylfi, the legendary Danish king Skjöldr, foreknowledge, and virginity. Gefjon
Gefjon
is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources; the Prose Edda
Prose Edda
and Heimskringla, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson; in the works of skalds; and appears as a gloss for various Greco-Roman goddesses in some Old Norse
Old Norse
translations of Latin
Latin
works. The Prose Edda
Prose Edda
and Heimskringla
Heimskringla
both report that Gefjon
Gefjon
plowed away what is now lake Mälaren, Sweden, and with this land formed the island of Zealand, Denmark
[...More...]

"Gefjon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zealand
Zealand
Zealand
(Danish: Sjælland, pronounced [ˈɕɛˌlanˀ]), at 7,031 km2, is the largest and most populated island in Denmark after Greenland
Greenland
with a population of 2,287,740 (39.8% of Denmark's total as of January 2017).[1] It is the 13th-largest island in Europe by area and the 4th most populous. It is connected to Funen
Funen
by the Great Belt
Great Belt
Fixed Link, to Lolland, Falster
Falster
(and Germany from 2028) by the Storstrøm Bridge
Storstrøm Bridge
and the Farø
Farø
Bridges. Zealand
Zealand
is also linked to Amager
Amager
by several bridges
[...More...]

"Zealand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Earnaness
Earnanæs (Old English), Aranæs (Old Swedish) and Aranäs (Modern Swedish) is the name of at least two locations, in what is today southern Sweden, which are known from history and legend. The names are variations of the same name, and this has aroused the interest of scholars since the 19th century. Beowulf[edit] In Beowulf, Earnanæs is the location in Geatland (today southern Sweden) where the hero of the epic kills a dragon, but at the cost of his own life. The ancient stronghold[edit]A woodcut of the castle by Olaus Magnus.The ancient stronghold of Aranæs (58°40′N 13°35′E / 58.667°N 13.583°E / 58.667; 13.583) was located near Skara
Skara
on the shore of lake Vänern, in Västergötland. In the early 14th century, it was the property of the marshal and Swedish regent Torkel Knutsson. In this castle, King Birger Magnusson signed a reconciliation treaty with his brothers, the dukes Eric and Valdemar Magnusson
[...More...]

"Earnaness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Inflow (hydrology)
In hydrology, the inflow of a body of water is the source of the water in the body of water. It can also refer to the average volume of incoming water in unit time. It is contrasted with outflow. Overview[edit] All bodies of water have multiple inflows, but often, one inflow may predominate and be the largest source of water. However, in many cases, no single inflow will predominate and there will be multiple primary inflows. For a lake, the inflow may be a river or stream that literally flows into the lake. Inflow may also be, strictly speaking, not flows, but rather precipitation, like rain. Inflow can also be used to refer to groundwater recharge. References[edit]External links[edit] The dictionary definition of inflow at WiktionaryThis article about geography terminology is a stub
[...More...]

"Inflow (hydrology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sea Level
Mean
Mean
sea level (MSL) (often shortened to sea level) is an average level of the surface of one or more of Earth's oceans from which heights such as elevations may be measured. MSL is a type of vertical datum – a standardised geodetic reference point – that is used, for example, as a chart datum in cartography and marine navigation, or, in aviation, as the standard sea level at which atmospheric pressure is measured to calibrate altitude and, consequently, aircraft flight levels. A common and relatively straightforward mean sea-level standard is the midpoint between a mean low and mean high tide at a particular location.[1] Sea
Sea
levels can be affected by many factors and are known to have varied greatly over geological time scales
[...More...]

"Sea Level" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Götaland
Götaland
Götaland
(Swedish: [ˈjøːtaland] ( listen), also Gothia, Gothland,[2][3] Gothenland or Gautland) is one of three lands of Sweden
Sweden
and comprises ten provinces. Geographically it is located in the south of Sweden, bounded to the north by Svealand, with the deep woods of Tiveden, Tylöskog
Tylöskog
and Kolmården
Kolmården
marking the border. Götaland
Götaland
once consisted of petty kingdoms, and their inhabitants were called Gautar in Old Norse[clarification needed]. It is generally agreed that these were the same as the Geats, the people of the hero Beowulf
Beowulf
in England's national epic, Beowulf. A part of today's Götaland
Götaland
merged with Svealand
Svealand
around 1100 and thereby formed Sweden; other parts were at that time either Danish or Norwegian
[...More...]

"Götaland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.