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Battle Of Villalar
8,400 men6,000 infantry 2,400 cavalry7,400 men7,000 infantry 400 cavalryCasualties and losses20–30 dead 500–1000 deadThe Battle of Villalar
Battle of Villalar
was a battle in the Revolt of the Comuneros fought on April 23, 1521 near the town of Villalar in Valladolid province, Spain. The royalist supporters of King Charles I won a crushing victory over the comuneros rebels. Three of the most important rebel leaders were captured, Juan de Padilla, Juan Bravo, and Francisco Maldonado. They were executed the next day, effectively ending armed resistance to Charles I.Contents1 Background1.1 Maneuvers in March and April 15212 Battle 3 Aftermath 4 Legacy 5 Notes 6 ReferencesBackground[edit] Maneuvers in March and April 1521[edit] In late March 1521, the royalist side moved to combine their armies and threaten Torrelobatón, a rebel stronghold
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Antonio Gisbert
Antonio Gisbert
Antonio Gisbert
Pérez (19 December 1834 – 27 November 1901) was a Spanish artist situated on the cusp between the realist and romantic movements in art. He was known for painting pictures of important events in a country's history in a realistic style, yet clearly with a political aim as well; his variance in styles puts him in the Spanish eclectic school of painters. He generally tried to promote liberal causes in his politics and paintings.Contents1 Career 2 Works 3 Gallery 4 References and linksCareer[edit] Gisbert was born in Alcoy on December 19, 1834
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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New Castile (Spain)
New Castile (Spanish: Castilla la Nueva [kasˈtiʎa la ˈnweβa]) is a historic region of Spain. It roughly corresponds to the historic Muslim Taifa of Toledo, taken during the Reconquista
Reconquista
of the peninsula by Christian
Christian
and thus becoming the southern part of the Castile. Key to the reconquest were the capture of Toledo in 1085, ending the Taifa's Kingdom of Toledo, and the Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa
Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa
in 1212. It continued to be called the Kingdom of Toledo
Kingdom of Toledo
when it was in the Crown of Castile
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Toledo, Spain
Toledo (Spanish: [toˈleðo]) is a city and municipality located in central Spain; it is the capital of the province of Toledo and the autonomous community of Castile–La Mancha. Toledo was declared a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
by UNESCO
UNESCO
in 1986 for its extensive monumental and cultural heritage. Toledo is known as the "Imperial City" for having been the main venue of the court of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and as the "City of the Three Cultures" for the cultural influences of Christians, Muslims and Jews reflected in its history. It was also the capital of the ancient Visigothic kingdom of Hispania, which followed the fall of the Roman Empire, and the location of historic events such as the Visigothic Councils of Toledo
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Juan Martín Díez
Martin
Martin
may refer to:Contents1 People1.1 In fiction2 Places2.1 Europe2.1.1 Croatia 2.1.2 England 2.1.3 Slovakia 2.1.4 Spain 2.1.5 Switzerland2.2 North America2.2.1 Canada 2.2.2 Haiti 2.2.3 United States2.3 Southern hemisphere2.3.1 Antarctica 2.3.2 Australia2.4 Other places3 Media 4 Music4.1 People 4.2 Songs5 Other uses 6 Other forms and similar namesPeople[edit]
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Peninsular War
French Empire Bonapartist Spain Confederation of the Rhine Napoleonic Italy Duchy of WarsawCommanders and leaders Arthur Wellesley William Beresford Rowland Hill John Moore † Francisco Castaños Juan Martín Díez José Palafox Gregorio de la Cuesta Miguel Álava Esquivel Joaquín Blake Bernardino Freire † Francisco da Silveira Napoleon
Napoleon
I Joseph I Joachim Murat Jean-Andoche Junot Jean de Dieu Soult André Masséna Michel Ney Louis Gabriel Suchet Jean Lannes Joseph Mortier Auguste de Marmont Jean-Baptiste Bessières Jean-Baptiste Jourdan
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Autonomous Communities Of Spain
In Spain, an autonomous community (Spanish: comunidad autónoma, Basque: autonomia erkidegoa, Catalan: comunitat autònoma, Galician: comunidade autónoma)[a] is a first-level political and administrative division, created in accordance with the Spanish constitution of 1978, with the aim of guaranteeing limited autonomy of the nationalities and regions that make up Spain.[1][2][3] Spain
Spain
is not a federation, but a highly decentralized[4][5] unitary state.[1] While sovereignty is vested in the nation as a whole, represented in the central institutions of government, the
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Second Spanish Republic
The Spanish Republic (Spanish: República Española), commonly known as the Second Spanish Republic
Second Spanish Republic
(Spanish: Segunda República Española) was the democratic regime that existed in Spain
Spain
from 1931 to 1939. The Republic was proclaimed on 14 April 1931, after the abdication of Alfonso XIII, and it lost the Spanish Civil War
Spanish Civil War
on 1 April 1939 to the Nationalist side, who would establish a military dictatorship under the rule of Francisco Franco. After the proclamation of the Republic, a provisional government was established until December 1931, when the 1931 Constitution was approved and the Republic formally established. The republican government of Manuel Azaña
Manuel Azaña
would start a great number of reforms to "modernize" the country
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Stephen Haliczer
Stephen Haliczer is an American Jewish historian of Spain, Italy, and the Catholic Church during the Early Modern era. He is a professor of history at Northern Illinois University. Haliczer's undergraduate work was done at Bard College and his graduate work at St. Andrews University. His study of Early Modern Spain has received praise from a variety of other historians, such as Joseph Perez.[1] In his books, Haliczer holds to the functionalist school of historical thought.[2] In 2006, he released an educational board game Vatican: Unlock the Secrets of How Men Become Pope. Based on his research, the game attempts to show the process of selecting a Pope as players first maneuver for position, then vie to be named the new Pope upon the previous Pope's death.[3] Works[edit] Books:The Castilian Urban Patriciate and the Jewish Expulsions of 1480-92. Washington, D.C.: American Historical Society
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Joseph Pérez
Joseph Pérez (born January 14, 1931) is a French historian specializing in Spanish history.[1] Pérez has specialized in the births of the modern Spanish state and the Latin American nations. Among his books, he examines the independence movements of Latin America; Ferdinand and Isabella, the Catholic Monarchs; Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, and Philip II of Spain.Contents1 Biography 2 Awards and honors 3 Works 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Joseph Pérez was born in Laroque-d'Olmes in the Ariège department, which is in the south of France near the Spanish border. His parents were Spaniards who emigrated from Bocairent in Valencia. In 1955, he was named a lecturer of Spanish by the Superior University of Saint-Cloud. He completed his doctoral thesis in 1970. His thesis studied the Revolt of the Comuneros, and remains one of the leading scholarly books on the topics. Pérez became, and still is, a professor of Spanish and Latin American civilization at the University of Bordeaux 3
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List Of People Associated With The Revolt Of The Comuneros
This is a list of participants and notable figures of the Revolt of the Comuneros, a rebellion from 1520 to 1522 in Castile.Contents1 Royalists1.1 Royal Council and Advisers 1.2 Military commanders2 Comuneros2.1 Nobles and Knights 2.2 Commoners 2.3 Clerics3 Others 4 ReferencesRoyalists[edit] The Royalist side fought to uphold the existing government of King Charles I (Carlos I). Along with Charles, the government was led by the Regent, Cardinal Adrian of Utrecht (Adriano de Utrecht)
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Crown Of Castile
The Crown of Castile[nb 1] was a medieval state in the Iberian Peninsula that formed in 1230 as a result of the third and definitive union of the crowns and, some decades later, the parliaments of the kingdoms of Castile and León upon the accession of the then Castilian king, Ferdinand III, to the vacant Leonese throne. It continued to exist as a separate entity after the personal union in 1469 of the crowns of Castile and Aragon with the marriage of the Catholic Monarchs up to the promulgation of the Nueva Planta decrees
Nueva Planta decrees
by Philip V in 1715. The Indies, Islands and Mainland of the Ocean Sea were also a part of the Crown of Castile
Crown of Castile
when transformed from lordships to kingdoms of the heirs of Castile in 1506, with the Treaty of Villafáfila, and upon the death of Ferdinand the Catholic. The title of "King of Castile" remained in use by the Habsburg rulers during the 16th and 17th centuries
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Crown Of Aragon
The Crown of Aragon
Crown of Aragon
(/ˈærəɡən/; Aragonese: Corona d'Aragón, Catalan: Corona d'Aragó, Spanish: Corona de Aragón) [nb 1] was a composite monarchy,[1] also nowadays referred to as a confederation of individual polities[3] or kingdoms[2] ruled by one king, with a personal and dynastic union of the Kingdom of Aragon
Kingdom of Aragon
and the County
County
of Barcelona. At the height of its power in the 14th and 15th centuries, the Crown of Aragon
Crown of Aragon
was a thalassocracy (a state with primarily maritime realms) controlling a large portion of present-day eastern Spain, parts of what is now southern France, and a Mediterranean "empire" which included the Balearic Islands, Sicily, Corsica, Sardinia, Malta, Southern Italy
Italy
(from 1442) and parts of Greece
Greece
(until 1388)
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Kingdom Of Navarre
 FranceThe Kingdom of Navarre
Navarre
(/nəˈvɑːr/; Basque: Nafarroako Erresuma, Spanish: Reino de Navarra, French: Royaume de Navarre, Latin: Regnum Navarrae), originally the Kingdom of Pamplona
Pamplona
(Basque: Iruñeko Erresuma), was a Basque-based kingdom[7] that occupied lands on either side of the western Pyrenees, alongside the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
between present-day Spain
Spain
and France. The medieval state took form around the city of Pamplona
Pamplona
during the first centuries of the Iberian Reconquista. The kingdom has its origins in the conflict in the buffer region between the Frankish king Charlemagne
Charlemagne
and the Umayyad Emirate that controlled most of the Iberian Peninsula
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