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Battle Of Sullivan's Island
Fort Sullivan:435 militia 31 artillery piecesOther defenses:3 shore batteries over 6,000 regulars and militia2,200 infantry 2 fourth-rates 6 frigates 1 bomb vesselCasualties and losses12 killed 25 wounded[1] 220 killed and wounded[2] 2 fourth-rates severely damaged 2 frigates moderately damaged 1 frigate grounded, later scuttled[1]v t eSouthern theater 1775–1779Gunpowder Incident Kemp's Landing Snow Campaign Savage's Old Fields Great Cane Brake Great Bridge Norfolk Moore's Creek Bridge Rice Boats Sullivan's Island Lindley's Fort Thomas Creek Alligator Bridge 1st Savannah Beaufort Van Creek Kettle Creek Brier Creek Chesapeake raid Stono Ferry Charles Town 2nd SavannahThe Battle of Sullivan's Island
Sullivan's Island
or the Battle of Fort Sullivan was fought on June 28, 1776, during the American Revolutionary War. It took place near Charleston, South Carolina, during the first British attempt to capture the city from American rebels
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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Thirteen Colonies
The Thirteen Colonies, also known as the Thirteen British Colonies[2] or the Thirteen American Colonies,[3] were a group of colonies of Great Britain on the Atlantic coast of America founded in the 17th and 18th centuries which declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States
United States
of America. The Thirteen Colonies had very similar political, constitutional, and legal systems and were dominated by Protestant English-speakers. They were part of Britain's possessions in the New World, which also included colonies in Canada, Florida, and the Caribbean. The colonial population grew from about 2,000 to 2.4 million between 1625 and 1775, displacing American Indians
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK or U.K.)[15] or Britain,[note 11] is a sovereign country located off the north­western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north­eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands.[16] Northern Ireland
Ireland
is the only part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland
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Bomb Vessel
A bomb vessel, bomb ship, bomb ketch, or simply bomb was a type of wooden sailing naval ship. Its primary armament was not cannons (long guns or carronades)—although bomb vessels carried a few cannons for self-defence—but mortars mounted forward near the bow and elevated to a high angle, and projecting their fire in a ballistic arc. Explosive shells (also called bombs at the time) or carcasses were employed rather than solid shot. Bomb vessels were specialized ships designed for bombarding (hence the name) fixed positions on land
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Frigate
A frigate /ˈfrɪɡɪt/ is any of several types of warship, the term having been used for ships of various sizes and roles over the last few centuries. In the 17th century, this term was used for any warship built for speed and maneuverability, the description often used being "frigate-built". These could be warships carrying their principal batteries of carriage-mounted guns on a single deck or on two decks (with further smaller carriage-mounted guns usually carried on the forecastle and quarterdeck of the vessel). The term was generally used for ships too small to stand in the line of battle, although early line-of-battle ships were frequently referred to as frigates when they were built for speed. In the 18th century, the term referred to ships that were usually as long as a ship of the line and were square-rigged on all three masts (full-rigged), but were faster and with lighter armament, used for patrolling and escort
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Fourth-rate
In the rating system of the British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
used to categorise sailing warships, a fourth-rate was a ship of the line with 46 to 60 guns mounted.Contents1 Small two decked warships 2 Large frigates and spar-decked frigates 3 Merchant conversions 4 BibliographySmall two decked warships[edit] A fourth-rate was, in the British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
during the first half of the 18th century, a ship of the line mounting from 46 up to 60 guns. While the number of guns stayed in the same range until 1817, after 1756 the ships of 50 guns and below were considered too weak to stand in the line of battle, although the remaining 60-gun ships were still classed as fit to be ships of the line
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Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
is the branch of an army that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantry traditionally relies on moving by foot between combats as well, but may also use mounts, military vehicles, or other transport
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Cannon
A cannon (plural: cannon or cannons) is a type of gun classified as artillery that launches a projectile using propellant. In the past, gunpowder was the primary propellant before the invention of smokeless powder in the 19th century. Cannon
Cannon
vary in caliber, range, mobility, rate of fire, angle of fire, and firepower; different forms of cannon combine and balance these attributes in varying degrees, depending on their intended use on the battlefield. The word cannon is derived from several languages, in which the original definition can usually be translated as tube, cane, or reed
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Militia
A militia /mɪˈlɪʃə/[1] is generally an army or some other fighting organization of non-professional soldiers, citizens of a nation, or subjects of a state, who can be called upon for military service during a time of need, as opposed to a professional force of regular, full-time military personnel, or historically, members of a warrior nobility class (e.g., knights or samurai). Generally unable to hold ground against regular forces, it is common for militias to be used for aiding regular troops by skirmishing, holding fortifications, or irregular warfare, instead of being used in offensive campaigns by themselves
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Shore Battery
Coastal artillery
Coastal artillery
is the branch of the armed forces concerned with operating anti-ship artillery or fixed gun batteries in coastal fortifications.[1] From the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
until World War II, coastal artillery and naval artillery in the form of cannon were highly important to military affairs and generally represented the areas of highest technology and capital cost among materiel. The advent of 20th-century technologies, especially military aviation, naval aviation, jet aircraft, and guided missiles, reduced the primacy of cannon, battleships, and coastal artillery. In countries where coastal artillery has not been disbanded, these forces have acquired amphibious capabilities
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Wounded In Action
Wounded in action (WIA) describes combatants who have been wounded while fighting in a combat zone during wartime, but have not been killed. Typically it implies that they are temporarily or permanently incapable of bearing arms or continuing to fight.[1] For the U.S. military, becoming WIA in combat generally results in subsequent conferral of the Purple Heart, because the purpose of the medal itself (one of the highest awards, military or civilian, officially given by the American government) is to recognize those killed, incapacitated, or wounded in battle.Contents1 NATO's definitions1.1 Wounded in action 1.2 Died of wounds received in action2 References 3 See alsoNATO's definitions[edit] Wounded in action[edit] A battle casualty other than killed in action who has incurred an injury due to an external agent or cause
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Sabal Palmetto
Sabal
Sabal
palmetto, also known as cabbage-palm,[3] palmetto, cabbage palmetto,[1] blue palmetto,[1] Carolina palmetto,[4] common palmetto,[4] swamp cabbage[5] and sabal palm, is one of 15 species of palmetto palm
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Province Of South Carolina
A province is almost always an administrative division, within a country or state. The term derives from the ancient Roman provincia, which was the major territorial and administrative unit of the Roman Empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The term province has since been adopted by many countries, and in those with no actual provinces, it has come to mean "outside the capital city". While some provinces were produced artificially by colonial powers, others were formed around local groups with their own ethnic identities. Many have their own powers independent of federal authority, especially in Canada
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Battles Of Lexington And Concord
Strategic American victoryBritish forces succeed in destroying cannon and supplies in Concord Militia
Militia
successfully drive British back to Boston Start of the American Revolutionary WarBelligerents  Massachusetts
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