HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Battle Of Jemappes
The Battle of Jemappes
Jemappes
(6 November 1792) took place near the town of Jemappes
Jemappes
in Hainaut, Belgium, near Mons
Mons
during the War of the First Coalition, part of the French Revolutionary Wars. One of the first major offensive battles of the war, it was a victory for the armies of the infant French Republic, and saw the French Armée du Nord, which included a large number of inexperienced volunteers, defeat a substantially smaller regular Austrian army. General Charles François Dumouriez, in command of an army of French Revolutionary volunteers, faced the Imperial army of Field Marshal Duke Albert of Saxe-Teschen
Albert of Saxe-Teschen
and his second-in-command François de Croix, Count of Clerfayt. The French, who outnumbered their opponents by about three-to-one, launched a series of enthusiastic but uncoordinated attacks against the Austrian position on a ridge
[...More...]

"Battle Of Jemappes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Battle Of Martinique (1794)
The Battle of Martinique
Martinique
was a successful British invasion in 1794 of the island of Martinique
Martinique
in the West Indies, during the French Revolutionary Wars. During the invasion the British were in negotiation with a French planter, Louis-François Dubuc, who wished to gain British protection, as the French Constitutional Assembly
Constitutional Assembly
was passing a law abolishing slavery. However the Whitehall Accord was not signed until after the British had landed. On 5 February, a fleet under the command of Admiral Sir John Jervis landed troops under the command of General Charles Grey. The invasion was completed with the surrender of Fort Bourbon on 24 March. References[edit]Fortescue, John. A history of the British Army, Volume 4This article about a battle in British history is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article about a battle in French history is a stub
[...More...]

"Battle Of Martinique (1794)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Battle Of Fishguard
The Battle of Fishguard
Fishguard
was a military invasion of Great Britain by Revolutionary France
France
during the War of the First Coalition. The brief campaign, on 22–24 February 1797, is the most recent landing on British soil by a hostile foreign force, and thus is often referred to as the "last invasion of Britain". The French General Lazare Hoche
Lazare Hoche
had devised a three-pronged attack on Britain in support of the Society of United Irishmen. Two forces would land in Britain as a diversionary effort, while the main body would land in Ireland
[...More...]

"Battle Of Fishguard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

East Indies Theatre Of The French Revolutionary Wars
Theatre
Theatre
or theater[1] is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers, typically actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage. The performers may communicate this experience to the audience through combinations of gesture, speech, song, music, and dance
[...More...]

"East Indies Theatre Of The French Revolutionary Wars" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Invasion Of Guadeloupe (1794)
Coordinates: 16°15′N 61°35′W / 16.250°N 61.583°W / 16.250; -61.583Guadeloupe Overseas region
Overseas region
and department of FranceFlagLogoCountry  FrancePrefecture Basse-TerreDepartments 1Government • President of the Regional Council Ary ChalusArea • Total 1,628 km2 (629 sq mi)Population (January 2013)[1][note 1] • Total 402,119 • Density 250/km2 (640/sq mi)Demonym(s) GuadeloupeanTime zone ECT (UTC-04)
[...More...]

"Invasion Of Guadeloupe (1794)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Atlantic Campaign Of May 1794
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
[...More...]

"Atlantic Campaign Of May 1794" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Capture Of The Dutch Fleet At Den Helder
The Capture of the Dutch fleet at Den Helder
Den Helder
or the Battle of Texel occurred in the night of the 23 January 1795, and presents a rare occurrence of a "naval" battle between warships and cavalry, in which a French Hussar
Hussar
regiment surprised a Dutch fleet frozen at anchor between the port of Den Helder
Den Helder
and the island of Texel.[1] After an extraordinary charge across the frozen Zuiderzee,[Note 1] the French cavalry captured 14 Dutch ships and 850 guns.[2] A capture of ships by horsemen is an extremely rare feat in military history.[3][4][5] The French units were the 8th Hussar
Hussar
Regiment and the 15th Line Infantry Regiment of the French Revolutionary Army. Jean-Charles Pichegru was the leader of the French army that invaded the Dutch Republic. The Dutch fleet was commanded by captain H. Reintjes. The actual capture was accomplished by Louis Joseph Lahure
[...More...]

"Capture Of The Dutch Fleet At Den Helder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Rhine Campaign Of 1795
The Rhine
Rhine
Campaign of 1795 (April 1795 to January 1796) saw two Habsburg Austrian armies under the overall command of François Sébastien Charles Joseph de Croix, Count of Clerfayt
Count of Clerfayt
defeat an attempt by two Republican French armies to cross the Rhine
Rhine
River and capture the Fortress of Mainz. At the start of the campaign the French Army of Sambre-et-Meuse
Army of Sambre-et-Meuse
led by Jean-Baptiste Jourdan
Jean-Baptiste Jourdan
confronted Clerfayt's Army of the Lower Rhine
Rhine
in the north, while the French Army of Rhin-et-Moselle under Jean- Charles Pichegru
Charles Pichegru
lay opposite Dagobert Sigmund von Wurmser's Army of the Upper Rhine
Rhine
in the south. In August Jourdan crossed and quickly seized Düsseldorf
[...More...]

"Rhine Campaign Of 1795" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Rhine Campaign Of 1796
Campaign or The Campaign may refer to:Advertising campaign Civil society campaign Military campaign Political campaign In agriculture, the period during which sugar beets are harvested and processedContents1 Places 2 Books 3 Film 4 Gaming 5 MusicPlaces[edit]Campaign, Tennessee, USABooks[edit]"The Campaign", the title of a poem by Joseph Addison Campaign (magazine), a British magazine serving the advertising industry
[...More...]

"Rhine Campaign Of 1796" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Anglo-Spanish War (1796–1808)
War
War
is a state of armed conflict between states or societies. It is generally characterized by extreme aggression, destruction, and mortality, using regular or irregular military forces. An absence of war is usually called "peace". Warfare refers to the common activities and characteristics of types of war, or of wars in general.[1] Total war is warfare that is not restricted to purely legitimate military targets, and can result in massive civilian or other non-combatant suffering and casualties. While some scholars see war as a universal and ancestral aspect of human nature,[2] others argue it is a result of specific socio-cultural or ecological circumstances.[3] The deadliest war in history, in terms of the cumulative number of deaths since its start, is World War
War
II, from 1939 to 1945, with 60–85 million deaths, followed by the Mongol conquests[4] at up to 60 million
[...More...]

"Anglo-Spanish War (1796–1808)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Battle Of Neuwied (1797)
The Battle of Neuwied
Neuwied
(18 April 1797) saw Lazare Hoche
Lazare Hoche
lead part of the French Army of Sambre-et-Meuse
Army of Sambre-et-Meuse
against Franz von Werneck's Austrian army. The French attack surprised their enemies and broke through their lines. Aside from 1,000 men killed and wounded, Austrian losses included at least 3,000 prisoners, 24 artillery pieces, 60 vehicles, and five colors. For their part, the French lost 2,000 men killed, wounded, and captured. The losses were in vain because Napoleon Bonaparte
Napoleon Bonaparte
signed the Preliminaries of Leoben
Preliminaries of Leoben
with Austria the same day. The armistice halted the fighting so that both sides could negotiate a peace
[...More...]

"Battle Of Neuwied (1797)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

War Of The Pyrenees
The Pyrenees
Pyrenees
(/ˈpɪrɪniːz/; Spanish: Pirineos [piɾiˈneos], French: Pyrénées [piʁene], Aragonese: Pirineus, Catalan: Pirineus [piɾiˈnɛus], Occitan: Pirenèus, Basque: Pirinioak [piˈɾinioˌak]) is a range of mountains in southwest Europe
Europe
that forms a natural border between Spain
Spain
and France. Reaching a height of 3,404 metres (11,168 ft) altitude at the peak of Aneto, the range separates the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
from the rest of continental Europe, and extends for about 491 km (305 mi) from the Bay of Biscay (Cap Higuer) to the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
(Cap de Creus). For the most part, the main crest forms a divide between Spain
Spain
and France, with the microstate of Andorra
Andorra
sandwiched in between
[...More...]

"War Of The Pyrenees" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Battle Of Diersheim (1797)
The Battle of Diersheim (20–21 April 1797) saw a First French Republic army led by Jean Victor Marie Moreau
Jean Victor Marie Moreau
clash with a Habsburg Austrian army commanded by Anton Count Sztáray de Nagy-Mihaly. Though both sides suffered about 3,000 casualties in the bitter fighting, the Austrians finally retreated with the loss of 13 artillery pieces. Austrian General Wilhelm von Immens was killed and Sztáray badly wounded. The combat at Diersheim was a waste of lives because Napoleon Bonaparte signed the Preliminaries of Leoben
Preliminaries of Leoben
with Austria a few days earlier, calling for a truce. However, Moreau's reputation was enhanced by his hard-won victory which occurred during the War of the First Coalition, part of the French Revolutionary Wars
[...More...]

"Battle Of Diersheim (1797)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hainaut (province)
Hainaut (Archaic English: Hainault, Heynalt, Heynowes; French: Hainaut, French pronunciation: ​[ɛno]; Dutch: Henegouwen, IPA: [ˈɦeːnəˌɣʌuwə(n)] ( listen); German: Hennegau; Walloon: Hinnot; Picard: Hénau) is a province of Belgium
Belgium
in the Walloon region. To its south lies the French Nord department, while within
[...More...]

"Hainaut (province)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Military Volunteer
A military volunteer is a person who enlists in military service by free will, and is not a mercenary or a foreign legionnaire. Volunteers often enlist to fight in the armed forces of a foreign country. Military
Military
volunteers are essential for the operation of volunteer militaries. Many armies, including the U.S. Army, formerly distinguished between " United States
United States
Volunteers" enlisted during a war, and "regulars" who served on long-term basis. Troops raised as state militia were always "volunteers" (even when recruited by conscription), while "U.S." troops could be volunteers or regulars. The rank of an officer in a volunteer unit was separate from his rank (if any) as a regular, and usually higher. When the volunteer forces were disbanded at the end of the war, officers with both kinds of commission reverted to their "regular" rank
[...More...]

"Military Volunteer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Field Marshal
Field marshal
Field marshal
(or field-marshal, abbreviated as FM) is a very senior military rank, ordinarily senior to the general officer ranks. Usually it is the highest rank in an army, and when it is, few (if any) persons are appointed to it. It is considered as a five-star rank (OF-10) in modern-day armed forces in many countries. Promotion to the rank of field marshal in many countries historically required extraordinary military achievement by a general (a wartime victory). However, the rank has also been used as a divisional command rank and also as a brigade command rank
[...More...]

"Field Marshal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.