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Battle Of Island Number 10
The Battle of Island Number Ten
Battle of Island Number Ten
was an engagement at the New Madrid or Kentucky Bend
Kentucky Bend
on the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
during the American Civil War, lasting from February 28 to April 8, 1862. The position, an island at the base of a tight double turn in the course of the river, was held by the Confederates from the early days of the war. It was an excellent site to impede Union efforts to invade the South by the river, as ships had to approach the island bows on and then slow to make the turns. For the defenders, however, it had an innate weakness in that it depended on a single road for supplies and reinforcements. If an enemy force managed to cut that road, the garrison would be isolated and eventually be forced to surrender. Union forces began the siege in March 1862, shortly after the Confederate Army abandoned their position at Columbus, Kentucky
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Western Theater Of The American Civil War
The Western Theater of the American Civil War
American Civil War
encompassed major military operations in the states of Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, North Carolina, Kentucky, South Carolina
South Carolina
and Tennessee, as well as Louisiana
Louisiana
east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River. Operations on the coasts of these states, except for Mobile Bay, are considered part of the Lower Seaboard Theater.[1] Most other operations east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
are part of the Eastern Theater
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Leonidas Polk
American Civil WarBattle of Shiloh Battle of Perryville Battle of Stones River Battle of Chickamauga Atlanta CampaignBattle of Marietta† Leonidas Polk
Leonidas Polk
(April 10, 1806 – June 14, 1864) was a planter in Maury County, Tennessee, and a second cousin of President James K. Polk. He served as bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana. He resigned his ecclesiastical position to become a major general in the Confederate army (called “Sewanee‘s Fighting Bishop”). His official portrait at the University depicts him dressed as a bishop with his army uniform hanging nearby. He is often erroneously named "Leonidas K. Polk." He had no middle name and never signed any documents as such. The errant "K" was derived from his listing in the post-bellum New Orleans
New Orleans
press as "Polk, Leon. (k)", signifying "killed in action". Polk was one of the more notable, yet controversial, political generals of the war
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Memphis, Tennessee
Memphis is a city located along the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee. With an estimated 2016 population of 652,717,[5] it is the cultural and economic center of West Tennessee
Tennessee
and the greater Mid-South region that includes portions of neighborhing Arkansas
Arkansas
and Mississippi. Memphis is the seat of Shelby County, the most populous county in Tennessee
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Capture Of New Orleans
The capture of New Orleans
New Orleans
(April 25 – May 1, 1862) during the American Civil War
American Civil War
was an important event for the Union. Having fought past Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the Union was unopposed in its capture of the city itself, which was spared the destruction suffered by many other Southern cities. However, the controversial and confrontational administration of the city by its U.S. Army military governor caused lasting resentment
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David G. Farragut
  United States
United States
of AmericaUnionService/branch  United States
United States
NavyUnion NavyYears of service 1810–1870Rank AdmiralCommands held USS Ferret USS Saratoga USS Brooklyn Mare Island Navy Yard European Squadron Western Gulf Blockading SquadronBattles/warsWar of 1812USS Essex vs. HMS Alert Action off Charles Island Nuku Hiva Campaign Battle of Valparaiso (WIA) (POW) West Indies
West Indies
anti-piracy operations Mexican–American War American Civil WarBattle of Forts Jackson and St. Philip Battle of New Orleans Siege of Vicksburg Siege of Port Hudson Battle of Mobile BaySignatureDavid Glasgow Farragut /ˈfærəɡət/ (also spelled Glascoe;[1][2][3][4] July 5, 1801 – August 14, 1870) was a flag officer of the United States
United States
Navy during the American Civil War
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Tiptonville, Tennessee
Tiptonville is a town in northwest Tennessee and the county seat of Lake County, Tennessee.[6] Its population was 2,439 as of the 2000 census and 4,464 in 2010, showing an increase of 2,025. It is also home to the Northwest Correctional Complex, a maximum security prison, known for once housing mass murderer Jessie Dotson, Jr.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Media 5 Education 6 Notable people 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Tiptonville was established in 1857, but was not incorporated until 1900. It was designated the county seat when Lake County was created in 1870.[1] Tiptonville was the scene of the surrender of Confederate forces at the end of the 1862 Battle of Island Number Ten in the American Civil War
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Reelfoot Lake
Reelfoot Lake
Lake
is a shallow natural lake located in the northwest portion of U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee, in Lake
Lake
and Obion counties. Much of it is really more of a swamp, with bayou-like ditches (some natural, some man-made) connecting more open bodies of water called basins, the largest of which is called Blue Basin. Reelfoot Lake
Lake
is noted for its bald cypress trees and its nesting pairs of bald eagles. Public use of the lake and grounds has been preserved since it was acquired by the state of Tennessee
Tennessee
in the early 1900s and the area established as Reelfoot Lake
Lake
State Park
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Plunging Fire
Plunging fire is a form of indirect fire, gunfire fired at a trajectory such as to fall on its target from above. It is normal at the high trajectories used to attain long range, and can be used deliberately to attack a target not susceptible to direct or grazing fire due to not being in direct line of sight.[1][2] In naval warfare plunging shellfire was often used to penetrate an enemy ship's thinner deck armor rather than firing directly at a warship's heavily armored side. Plunging fire in terrestrial warfare allows attacking a target not in direct line of sight, for example over the brow of a hill engaging in a reverse slope defence. Artillery
Artillery
weapons such as howitzers and mortars are designed for this purpose
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Battle Of Fort Donelson
The Battle of Fort Donelson
Fort Donelson
was fought from February 12–16, 1862, in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. The Union capture of the Confederate fort near the Tennessee– Kentucky
Kentucky
border opened the Cumberland River, an important avenue for the invasion of the South. The Union's success also elevated Brig. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant
from an obscure and largely unproven leader to the rank of major general, and earned him the nickname of "Unconditional Surrender" Grant. Grant moved his army 12 miles (19 km) overland to Fort Donelson on February 12 and 13 and conducted several small probing attacks. (Although the name was not yet in use, the troops serving under Grant were the nucleus of the Union's Army of the Tennessee.[4]) On February 14, Union gunboats under Flag Officer Andrew H. Foote
Andrew H

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Battle Of Fort Henry
The Battle of Fort Henry
Battle of Fort Henry
was fought on February 6, 1862, in western Middle Tennessee
Middle Tennessee
[clarification needed], during the American Civil War. It was the first important victory for the Union and Brig. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant
in the Western Theater. On February 4 and 5, Grant landed two divisions just north of Fort Henry on the Tennessee River. (The troops serving under Grant were the nucleus of the Union's successful Army of the Tennessee, although that name was not yet in use.[3]) Grant's plan was to advance upon the fort on February 6 while it was being simultaneously attacked by Union gunboats commanded by Flag Officer Andrew Hull Foote. A combination of accurate and effective naval gunfire, heavy rain, and the poor siting of the fort, nearly inundated by rising river waters, caused its commander, Brig. Gen
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Major General (CSA)
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
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Brigadier General (CSA)
The general officers of the Confederate States Army
Confederate States Army
(CSA) were the senior military leaders of the Confederacy during the American Civil War of 1861–1865. They were often former officers from the United States Army (the regular army) prior to the Civil War, while others were given the rank based on merit or when necessity demanded. Most Confederate generals needed confirmation from the Confederate Congress, much like prospective generals in the modern U.S
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USS Pittsburg (1861)
USS Pittsburgh (1861) (often Pittsburg) was a City-class ironclad gunboat constructed for the Union Army by James B. Eads during the American Civil War, and transferred to the Union Navy in October 1862. She was commissioned in January 1862, Commander Egbert Thompson in command.Contents1 Operational history 2 Armament 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksOperational history[edit] Joining Flag Officer Andrew Hull Foote's Western Gunboat Flotilla in river patrol duty, Pittsburgh attacked Fort Donelson February 14, 1862, and was damaged by counter-fire. The support from the gunboats contributed greatly to the capture of the strategic fort two days later.Pittsburgh and Carondelet destroy Confederate batteries below New MadridRepaired, she attacked Island No. 10 on April 3, then ran its batteries by dark April 7, being lashed by a heavy thunderstorm as well as the island's 73 guns
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Gideon J. Pillow
Mexican-American WarBattle of Cerro Gordo Battle of ChapultepecAmerican Civil WarBattle of Belmont Battle of Fort Donelson Battle of Stones River Gideon Johnson Pillow
Gideon Johnson Pillow
(June 8, 1806 – October 8, 1878) was an American lawyer, politician, speculator, slaveowner, United States Army major general of volunteers during the Mexican-American War
Mexican-American War
and Confederate brigadier general in the American Civil War. Before his military career, Pillow practiced law and was active in Democratic Party politics. He was a floor leader in support of the nomination of fellow-Tennessean James K. Polk
James K. Polk
at the 1844 Democratic National Convention. In 1847, Pillow was commissioned a brigadier general of volunteers to serve in the Mexican-American War, and was later promoted to major general
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