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Bartok (card Game)
The game of Bartok, also known by a number of other names, such as Wartoke, Warthog, Bartog, Bentok, Last One Standing or Bong 98, is a card game where the winner of each round invents a new rule which must be obeyed for the remainder of the game. It belongs to the "shedding" or Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
family of card games, whereby each player tries to rid himself of all of his cards. The game progresses through a series of rounds with a new rule being added in each round, thus making the game increasingly complex as it progresses. These newly introduced rules may modify any existing rules.Contents1 Gameplay1.1 Creating new rules 1.2 Penalties2 Mao 3 See also 4 External linksGameplay[edit] The game of Bartok consists of several rounds of play. The winner of each round creates a new rule which remains in play for future rounds of the game. The players sit in a circle and the cards are placed face down in the center and mixed
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Tactic (method)
A tactic (from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
τακτική taktike meaning "art of arrangement") is a conceptual action aiming at the achievement of a goal
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Uno (card Game)
Uno (/ˈuːnoʊ/; from Italian and Spanish for 'one') (stylized as UNO) is an American shedding-type card game that is played with a specially printed deck. The game's general principles put it into the Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
family of card games. The game was originally developed in 1971 by Merle Robbins in Reading, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati. It has been a Mattel
Mattel
brand since 1992. When his family and friends began to play more and more, he spent $8,000 to have 5,000 copies of the game made. He sold it from his barbershop at first, and local businesses began to sell it as well. Robins later sold the rights to UNO to a group of friends headed by Robert Tezak, a funeral parlor owner in Joliet, Illinois, for $50,000 plus royalties of 10 cents per game. Tezak formed International Games, Inc., to market UNO, with offices behind his funeral parlor
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Drinking Game
Drinking games are games which involve the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Evidence of the existence of drinking games dates back to antiquity. Drinking games have been banned at some institutions, particularly colleges and universities.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Ancient Greece 1.2 Ancient China2 Types2.1 Endurance 2.2 Speed 2.3 Skill 2.4 Thinking 2.5 Card and dice 2.6 Arts 2.7 Hybrid games 2.8 Mobile app games3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]Symposium, with scene of Kottabos
Kottabos
- fresco from the Tomb of the Diver in Paestum, 475 BCWager cup (Dublin, Ireland)[2]Ancient Greece[edit] Kottabos
Kottabos
is one of the earliest known drinking games from ancient Greece, dated to the 5th to 4th centuries BC. Players would use dregs to hit targets across the room with their wine
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Delay Of Game
Delay of game is an action in a sports game in which a player or team deliberately stalls the game, usually with the intention of using the delay to its advantage. In some sports, the delay of game is considered an infraction if it is longer than that permitted according to the game's rules, in which case a penalty can be issued. Some sports that have a delay of game penalty are American football, Canadian football, ice hockey and association football.Contents1 Gridiron football1.1 American 1.2 Canadian2 Soccer 3 Ice hockey 4 Bowling 5 Baseball 6 Basketball 7 Quiz bowl 8 See also 9 ReferencesGridiron football[edit] American[edit] In American football, an offensive team is penalized five yards for delay of game if it fails to put the ball in play by either snap or free kick before the play clock expires. This time limit varies by league, and is often 25 seconds from the time the referee signals the ball ready for play
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Dvorak (game)
Dvorak is a customizable card game that begins with a deck of blank index cards. These index cards (or pieces of paper or cardboard) are written and drawn upon by players before or during the game. Alternatively, games of Dvorak can be played online via a MUSH or the Thoth card game engine.Contents1 Rules1.1 Creating cards 1.2 Playing 1.3 Special
Special
rules 1.4 Rule and card conflicts2 See also 3 External linksRules[edit] The game revolves around two types of cards: Actions, which are discarded when played, and Things, which remain in play on the table in front of whoever played them. The winner is determined by the rules of the deck being used. Winning often requires a player to achieve a certain goal or play a certain card, but every deck is different
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Nomic
Nomic is a game created in 1982 by philosopher Peter Suber
Peter Suber
in which the rules of the game include mechanisms for the players to change those rules, usually beginning through a system of democratic voting.[1] Nomic is a game in which changing the rules is a move. In that respect it differs from almost every other game. The primary activity of Nomic is proposing changes in the rules, debating the wisdom of changing them in that way, voting on the changes, deciding what can and cannot be done afterwards, and doing it. Even this core of the game, of course, can be changed. — Peter Suber, The Paradox of Self-Amendment[2]The initial ruleset was designed by Peter Suber, but first published in Douglas Hofstadter's column Metamagical Themas in Scientific American in June 1982.[3] The column discussed Suber's then-upcoming book, The Paradox of Self-Amendment, which was published some years later
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List Of Games With Concealed Rules
Games with concealed rules are games where the rules are intentionally concealed from new players, either because their discovery is part of the game itself, or because the game is a hoax and the rules do not exist. In fiction, the counterpart of the first category are games that supposedly do have a rule set, but that rule set is not disclosed.Contents1 Actual games1.1 Discovery games 1.2 Hoax or joke games2 Games in works of fiction2.1 Games with undisclosed rules 2.2 Hoax games3 See also 4 References 5 External linksActual games[edit] Discovery games[edit]Eleusis: A card game in which one player secretly decides on a rule which determines which cards may be played on top of each other
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Anglo-American Playing Cards
French playing cards
French playing cards
is the most common deck of playing cards used today. It includes thirteen ranks of each of the four French suits: clubs (♣), diamonds (♦), hearts (♥) and spades (♠), with reversible "court" or face cards. Some modern designs, however, have done away with reversible face cards. Each suit includes an ace, depicting a single symbol of its suit; a king, queen and jack, each depicted with a symbol of its suit; and ranks two through ten, with each card depicting that many symbols (pips) of its suit
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Mao (card Game)
Mao (or Mau[2]) is a card game of the shedding family, in which the aim is to get rid of all of the cards in hand without breaking certain unspoken rules. The game is from a subset of the Stops family and is similar in structure to the card game Uno or Crazy Eights.[3][4][5][6][excessive citations] The game forbids its players from explaining the rules, and new players are often informed that "the only rule you may be told is this one".[7][8] The ultimate goal of the game is to be the first player to get rid of all the cards in their hand. Specifics are discovered through trial and error. A player who breaks a rule is penalized by being given an additional card from the deck
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Card Game
A card game is any game using playing cards as the primary device with which the game is played, be they traditional or game-specific. Countless card games exist, including families of related games (such as poker). A small number of card games played with traditional decks have formally standardized rules, but most are folk games whose rules vary by region, culture, and person. Many games that are not generally placed in the family of card games do in fact use cards for some aspect of their gameplay. Similarly, some games that are placed in the card game genre involve a board
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Asshole (card Game)
President is a westernized version of an originally Japanese card game named daifugō or daihinmin. It is a game for three or more, in which the players race to get rid of all of the cards in their hands in order to become "president" in the following round.[1][2][3] It can also be played as a drinking game.[1][2][3][4] A commercial version of the game exists under the name The Great Dalmuti, with a non-standard deck.Contents1 General rules1.1 Special
Special
titles 1.2 Burning Cards2 Terms 3 How to play3.1 Dealing 3.2 Playing 3.3 End of a round 3.4 President's choice and trading 3.5 Revolutions4 Variations 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeneral rules[edit] Generally, players attempt to get rid of their cards first. It is usually played as an aces-high game, although 2s are wild and the red 3 is highest, but 2s cannot beat red 3s. The black 3s are the lowest cards, and 2s can be played as black 3s
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Kings (card Game)
Kings (king's cup, donut, jug oval, of fire, or ring of fire) is a drinking game that uses playing cards. The player must drink and dispense drinks based on cards drawn. Each card has a rule that is predetermined before the game starts
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Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
is a shedding-type card game for two to seven players. The object of the game is to be the first to get rid of all the player's cards to a discard pile
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Bartok (card Game)
The game of Bartok, also known by a number of other names, such as Wartoke, Warthog, Bartog, Bentok, Last One Standing or Bong 98, is a card game where the winner of each round invents a new rule which must be obeyed for the remainder of the game. It belongs to the "shedding" or Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
family of card games, whereby each player tries to rid himself of all of his cards. The game progresses through a series of rounds with a new rule being added in each round, thus making the game increasingly complex as it progresses. These newly introduced rules may modify any existing rules.Contents1 Gameplay1.1 Creating new rules 1.2 Penalties2 Mao 3 See also 4 External linksGameplay[edit] The game of Bartok consists of several rounds of play. The winner of each round creates a new rule which remains in play for future rounds of the game. The players sit in a circle and the cards are placed face down in the center and mixed
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