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Barrier Island
Barrier islands are coastal landforms and a type of dune system that are exceptionally flat or lumpy areas of sand that form by wave and tidal action parallel to the mainland coast. They usually occur in chains, consisting of anything from a few islands to more than a dozen. They are subject to change during storms and other action, but absorb energy and protect the coastlines and create areas of protected waters where wetlands may flourish
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Delaware Bay
Delaware
Delaware
Bay
Bay
is the estuary outlet of the Delaware River
Delaware River
on the Northeast seaboard of the United States. Approximately 782 square miles (2,030 km2) in area,[2] the bay's fresh water mixes for many miles with the salt water of the Atlantic Ocean. The bay is bordered inland by the States of New Jersey
New Jersey
and Delaware, and the Delaware
Delaware
Capes, Cape Henlopen
Cape Henlopen
and Cape May, on the Atlantic. The Delaware
Delaware
Bay
Bay
is bordered by six counties: Sussex, Kent, and New Castle in Delaware, along with Cape May, Cumberland, and Salem in New Jersey. The Cape May–Lewes Ferry
Cape May–Lewes Ferry
crosses the Delaware
Delaware
Bay
Bay
from Cape May, New Jersey, to Lewes, Delaware
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Cross Bedding
In geology, cross-bedding is layering within a stratum and at an angle to the main bedding plane. The sedimentary structures which result are roughly horizontal units composed of inclined layers. The original depositional layering is tilted, such tilting not being the result of post-depositional deformation
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Aggradation
Aggradation
Aggradation
(or alluviation) is the term used in geology for the increase in land elevation, typically in a river system, due to the deposition of sediment. Aggradation
Aggradation
occurs in areas in which the supply of sediment is greater than the amount of material that the system is able to transport. The mass balance between sediment being transported and sediment in the bed is described by the Exner equation. Typical aggradational environments include lowland alluvial rivers, river deltas, and alluvial fans. Aggradational environments are often undergoing slow subsidence which balances the increase in land surface elevation due to aggradation
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Venice
Venice
Venice
(/ˈvɛnɪs/, VEN-iss; Italian: Venezia, [veˈnɛttsja] ( listen); Venetian: Venesia, [veˈnɛsja]) is a city in northeastern Italy
Italy
and the capital of the Veneto
Veneto
region. It is situated across a group of 118 small islands[1] that are separated by canals and linked by bridges, of which there are 400.[2][3] The islands are located in the shallow Venetian Lagoon, an enclosed bay that lies between the mouths of the Po and the Piave Rivers. Parts of Venice
Venice
are renowned for the beauty of their settings, their architecture, and artwork.[2] The lagoon and a part of the city are listed as a World Heritage Site.[2] In 2014, 264,579 people resided in Comune
Comune
di Venezia, of whom around 55,000 live in the historic city of Venice
Venice
(Centro storico)
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Lido Di Venezia
The Lido, or Venice Lido (Lido di Venezia), is an 11-kilometre (7-mile) long sandbar in Venice, northern Italy; it is home to about 20,000 residents. The Venice Film Festival takes place at the Lido every September.[1]Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Legacy 4 Gallery 5 Lido di Venezia in art 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] The island is home to three settlements. The Lido itself, in the north, is home to the Film Festival, the Grand Hotel des Bains, the Venice Casino and the Grand Hotel Excelsior. Malamocco, in the centre, was the first and, for a long time, the only settlement. It was at one time home to the Doge of Venice
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Elie De Beaumont
Jean-Baptiste Armand Louis Léonce Élie de Beaumont (25 September 1798 – 21 September 1874) was a French geologist. Biography[edit] Élie de Beaumont was born at Canon, in Calvados. He was educated at the Lycee Henri IV
Lycee Henri IV
where he took the first prize in mathematics and physics at the École polytechnique, where he stood first at the exit examination in 1819; and at the École des mines (1819–1822), where he began to show a decided preference for the science with which his name is associated
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Grove Karl Gilbert
Grove Karl Gilbert
Grove Karl Gilbert
(May 6, 1843 – May 1, 1918), known by the abbreviated name G. K. Gilbert in academic literature, was an American geologist.Contents1 Biography1.1 Rockies geologist 1.2 Meteor Crater2 Geomorphology 3 Awards 4 Publications 5 See also 6 References 7 Secondary Sources 8 External linksBiography[edit] Gilbert was born in Rochester, New York
Rochester, New York
and graduated from the University of Rochester. In 1871, he joined George M. Wheeler's geographical survey as its first geologist. Rockies geologist[edit]Headward erosion of a gully; photo by G.K. GilbertHe then joined the Powell Survey of the Rocky Mountain Region in 1874, becoming Powell's primary assistant, and stayed with the survey until 1879.[1] During this time he published an important monograph, The Geology
Geology
of the Henry Mountains
Henry Mountains
(1877)
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Tasman Bay
Tasman Bay / Te Tai-o-Aorere, originally known as Blind Bay, is a large V-shaped bay at the north end of New Zealand's South Island. Located in the centre of the island's northern coast, it stretches along 120 kilometres (75 mi) of coastline and is 70 kilometres (43 mi) across at its widest point. It is an arm of the Tasman Sea, lying on the western approach to Cook Strait. At the bay's western extremity, the land around the bay is rough and densely forested. Separation Point, the westernmost point of the bay, is located in Abel Tasman National Park and separates Tasman Bay from its smaller neighbour, Golden Bay. To the east, the land is also steep, with the westernmost points of sea-drowned valleys of the Marlborough Sounds. D'Urville Island sits to the northeast of Tasman Bay's easternmost point
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Tauranga Harbour
Tauranga Harbour is the natural tidal harbour that surrounds Tauranga CBD and the Mount Maunganui area of Tauranga, New Zealand, and which flows into the Pacific Ocean at Mount Maunganui and Bowentown. The harbour is effectively two flooded river systems separated from the Pacific Ocean by Matakana Island. The harbour is a large tidal estuary with an area of some 200-km2 and has a tidal range of up to 1.98m. Approximately 290,000,000 tonnes of water flow through the entrances at each tidal change. This tidal flow can generate currents of up to 7 knots within the entrance channels; small boat operators must respect this entrance current. The Port of Tauranga is located in the harbour and container ships and cruise ships use the harbour's waters. The Tauranga harbour entrance is the shipping channel to the Port of Tauranga, New Zealand’s largest export port
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Saint Lawrence
Saint Lawrence
Saint Lawrence
or Laurence (Latin: Laurentius, lit. "laurelled"; 31 December AD 225[1] – 10 August 258) was one of the seven deacons of the city of Rome, Italy, under Pope
Pope
St Sixtus II who were martyred in the persecution of the Christians that the Roman Emperor Valerian ordered in 258Contents1 Life 2 Martyrdom 3 Associated Roman churches 4 Miracles 5 Veneration5.1 Roman Catholic Church 5.2 Anglican Communion6 Legacy 7 Patronage 8 Gallery 9 In popular culture 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksLife[edit] St Lawrence is thought to have been born on 31 December AD 225[1] in Valencia, or less probably, in Huesca, the town from which his parents came in the later region of Aragon
Aragon
that was then part of the Roman province of Hispania
Hispania
Tarraconensis.[2] The martyrs St
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Portage Island
Portage Island is an island in the western part of Bellingham Bay in Whatcom County, Washington, United States. It is separated from the Lummi Peninsula by Portage Bay and from the central part of Lummi Island by Hale Passage, in Whatcom County. Portage Island has a land area of 3.803 km² (1.468 sq mi). There was no resident population as of the 2000 census. According to the Whatcom County Assessors database, the land and the surrounding tide flats are owned by the Lummi Native American tribe. References[edit]Portage Island: Blocks 3001 and 3002, Census Tract 108, Whatcom County, Washington United States Census BureauThis Whatcom County, Washington state location article is a stub
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New Brunswick
New Brunswick
New Brunswick
(French: Nouveau-Brunswick; Canadian French pronunciation: [nuvobʁɔnzwɪk] ( listen)) is one of three Maritime provinces on the east coast of Canada. The original inhabitants of the land were the Mi'kmaq, the Maliseet, and the Passamaquoddy
Passamaquoddy
peoples. Being relatively close to Europe, New Brunswick
New Brunswick
was among the first places in North America
North America
to be explored and settled, starting with the French in the early 1600s, who eventually colonized most of the Maritimes and some of Maine
Maine
as the colony of Acadia. The area was caught up in the global conflict between the British and French empires, and in 1755 became part of Nova Scotia, to be partitioned off in 1784 following an influx of refugees from the American Revolutionary War. In 1785, Saint John became the first incorporated city in Canada
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Hypoxia (environmental)
Hypoxia refers to low oxygen conditions. Normally, 20.9% of the gas in the atmosphere is oxygen. The partial pressure of oxygen in the atmosphere is 20.9% of the total barometric pressure.[1] In water however, oxygen levels are much lower, approximately 1%, and fluctuate locally depending on the presence of photosynthetic organisms and relative distance to the surface (if there is more oxygen in the air, it will diffuse across the partial pressure gradient).[2]Contents1 Atmospheric hypoxia 2 Aquatic hypoxia2.1 Causes of hypoxia2.1.1 Phytoplankton
Phytoplankton
breakdown2.1.1.1 Breakdown of lignin 2.1.1.2 Environmental factors2.2 Solutions3 See also 4 References4.1 Sources5 External linksAtmospheric hypoxia[edit] Atmospheric hypoxia occurs naturally at high altitudes
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Aeolian Processes
Aeolian processes, also spelled eolian or æolian, pertain to wind activity in the study of geology and weather and specifically to the wind's ability to shape the surface of the Earth
Earth
(or other planets). Winds may erode, transport, and deposit materials and are effective agents in regions with sparse vegetation, a lack of soil moisture and a large supply of unconsolidated sediments
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Backshore
The backshore area of a beach extends from the limit of high water foam lines to dunes or extreme inland limit of the beach.[1] It is only affected by waves during exceptional high tides or severe storms.[2] Sediments in this area are well-sorted and well-rounded. Its grain sizes are mainly coarse sand and medium sand, which are larger than that in littoral barrier dune.The sedimentary structures include parallel bedding and low-angle cross-bedding. References[edit]^  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Department of Defense
United States Department of Defense
document "Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms". ^ Whittow, John (1984). Dictionary of Physical Geography. London: Penguin, 1984, p. 47. ISBN 0-14-051094-X.This article about geography terminology is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis geology article is a stub
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