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Baretta
Baretta
Baretta
is an American detective television series which ran on ABC from 1975-78.[1] The show was a revised milder version of a 1973–74 ABC series, Toma, starring Tony Musante
Tony Musante
as chameleon-like, real-life New Jersey
New Jersey
police officer David Toma. When Musante left the series after a single season, the concept was retooled as Baretta, with Robert Blake in the title role.[2][3]Contents1 Overview1.1 Supporting cast2 Episodes 3 Production notes 4 Syndication 5 DVD release 6 Cultural references 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] Detective Anthony Vincenzo "Tony" Baretta
Baretta
is an unorthodox plainclothes cop (badge #609) with the 53rd precinct, who lives with Fred, his Triton sulphur-crested cockatoo, in apartment 2C at the run-down King Edward Hotel in an unnamed, fictional city
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Informant
An informant (also called an informer)[1] is a person who provides privileged information about a person or organization to an agency. The term is usually used within the law enforcement world, where they are officially known as confidential or criminal informants (CI), and can often refer pejoratively to the supply of information without the consent of the other parties with the intent of malicious, personal or financial gain.[2] However, the term is used in politics, industry and academia.[3][4]Contents1 Criminal informants1.1 Informant
Informant
motivation2 Labor and social movements 3 Politics 4 Jailhouse informants 5 Terminology and slang 6 List of famous individuals 7 See also 8 ReferencesCriminal informants[edit] Informants are commonly found in the world of organized crime. By its very nature, organized crime involves many people who are aware of each other's guilt, in a variety of illegal activities
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Police Officer
A police officer, also known as an officer, policeman, policewoman, cop, police agent, or a police employee[1][2] is a warranted law employee of a police force. In most countries, "police officer" is a generic term not specifying a particular rank. In some, the use of the rank "officer" is legally reserved for military personnel. Police
Police
officers are generally charged with the apprehension of criminals and the prevention and detection of crime, protection and assistance of the general public, and the maintenance of public order. Police
Police
officers may be sworn to an oath, and have the power to arrest people and detain them for a limited time, along with other duties and powers. Some officers are trained in special duties, such as counter-terrorism, surveillance, child protection, VIP protection, civil law enforcement, and investigation techniques into major crime including fraud, rape, murder, and drug trafficking
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Imprisonment
Imprisonment (from imprison Old French, French emprisonner, from en in + prison prison, from Latin prensio, arrest, from prehendere, prendere, to seize) is the restraint of a person's liberty, for any cause whatsoever, whether by authority of the government, or by a person acting without such authority. In the latter case it is "false imprisonment". Imprisonment does not necessarily imply a place of confinement, with bolts and bars, but may be exercised by any use or display of force, lawfully or unlawfully, wherever displayed, even in the open street
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Crime
In ordinary language, a crime is an unlawful act punishable by a state or other authority.[1] The term "crime" does not, in modern criminal law, have any simple and universally accepted definition,[2] though statutory definitions have been provided for certain purposes.[3] The most popular view is that crime is a category created by law; in other words, something is a crime if declared as such by the relevant and applicable law.[2] One proposed definition is that a crime or offence (or criminal offence) is an act harmful not only to some individual but also to a community, society or the state ("a public wrong"). Such acts are forbidden and punishable by law.[1][4] The notion that acts such as murder, rape and theft are to be prohibited exists worldwide.[5] What precisely is a criminal offence is defined by criminal law of each country
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Titos Vandis
Titos Vandis (Greek: Τίτος Βανδής; 7 November 1917 – 23 February 2003) was a Greek actor who appeared in more than 100 films and television shows between 1953 and 2000.[1] He left Greece when a dictatorship took power and lived in the United States for 24 years.[2] Vandis starred in the film Oi paranomoi (1958), which was entered into the 8th Berlin International Film Festival.[3] In 1972, he appeared in the Woody Allen
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Me-TV
MeTV
MeTV
(an abbreviation for Memorable Entertainment Television) is an American broadcast television network that is owned by Weigel Broadcasting and distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.[3] Marketed as "The Definitive Destination for Classic TV," the network airs a variety of classic television programs from the 1950s through the early 1990s, which are sourced primarily from the libraries of CBS Television Distribution and 20th Television
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Universal Studios Home Entertainment
Universal Pictures
Universal Pictures
Home Entertainment[1] (formerly Universal Studios Home Entertainment, Universal Studios
Universal Studios
Home Video, MCA/Universal Home Video, MCA Home Video, MCA Videodisc Inc. and MCA Videocassette Inc.) is the home video distribution division of American film studio Universal Pictures, owned by the Universal Filmed Entertainment Group division of NBCUniversal, owned by Comcast.Contents1 History 2 Internationally 3 List of direct-to-video films3.1 American Girl 3.2 R.L
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Mad (magazine)
Mad (stylized as MAD) is an American humor magazine founded in 1952 by editor Harvey Kurtzman
Harvey Kurtzman
and publisher William Gaines,[3] launched as a comic book before it became a magazine. It was widely imitated and influential, affecting satirical media, as well as the cultural landscape of the 20th century, with editor Al Feldstein
Al Feldstein
increasing readership to more than two million during its 1974 circulation peak.[4] From 1952 until 2018, Mad had published 550 regular issues, as well as hundreds of reprint "Specials", original-material paperbacks, reprint compilation books and other print projects. The magazine will revert back to 1 after the April 2018 issue. The magazine is the last surviving title from the EC Comics
EC Comics
line, offering satire on all aspects of life and popular culture, politics, entertainment, and public figures
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as the NYT and NYTimes) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[5][6][7] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[8][9] The Times
The Times
is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S.[10] The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded and is controlled by the Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[11] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Detective Fiction
Detective
Detective
fiction is a subgenre of crime fiction and mystery fiction in which an investigator or a detective—either professional, amateur or retired—investigates a crime, often murder. The detective genre began around the same time as speculative fiction and other genre fiction in the mid-nineteenth century and has remained extremely popular, particularly in novels.[1] Some of the most famous heroes of detective fiction include C. Auguste Dupin, Sherlock Holmes, and Hercule Poirot. Juvenile stories featuring The Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, and The Boxcar Children
The Boxcar Children
have also remained in print for several decades
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Pimp
Procuring or pandering is the facilitation or provision of a prostitute or sex worker in the arrangement of a sex act with a customer.[1] A procurer, colloquially called a pimp (if male) or a madam (if female), is an agent for prostitutes who collects part of their earnings. The procurer may receive this money in return for advertising services, physical protection, or for providing, and possibly monopolizing, a location where the prostitute may engage clients
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The New York Times Company
Coordinates: 40°45′22″N 73°59′25″W / 40.75611°N 73.99028°W / 40.75611; -73.99028 The New York Times
The New York Times
CompanyTypePublicTraded as Class A Common Stock: NYSE: NYT S&P 400 Component Class B Common Stock: unlistedIndustry NewspapersFounded September 18, 1851; 166 years ago (1851-09-18)Founders Henry Jarvis Raymond George JonesHeadquarters
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License Plate
A vehicle registration plate, also known as a number plate (British English) or a license plate (American English), is a metal or plastic plate attached to a motor vehicle or trailer for official identification purposes. All countries require registration plates for road vehicles such as cars, trucks, and motorcycles. Whether they are required for other vehicles, such as bicycles, boats, or tractors, may vary by jurisdiction. The registration identifier is a numeric or alphanumeric ID that uniquely identifies the vehicle owner within the issuing region's vehicle register. In some countries, the identifier is unique within the entire country, while in others it is unique within a state or province. Whether the identifier is associated with a vehicle or a person also varies by issuing agency
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Chevrolet Impala
The Chevrolet
Chevrolet
Impala /ʃɛvrəˈleɪ ɪmˈpælə, -ˈpɑːlə/ is a full-size car built by Chevrolet
Chevrolet
for model years 1958–85, 1994–96 and since 2000 onwards. The Impala was Chevrolet's most expensive passenger model through 1965 and had become the best-selling automobile in the United States.[citation needed] For its debut in 1958, the Impala was distinguished from other models by its symmetrical triple taillights. The Caprice was introduced as a top-line Impala Sport Sedan for model year 1965, later becoming a separate series positioned above the Impala in 1966, which, in turn, remained above the Bel Air and the Biscayne
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Newsboy Cap
The newsboy cap or newsy cap is a casual-wear cap similar in style to the flat cap. Sometimes also referred to as the: Baker Boy, Bandit Cap, Apple Cap, Eight Piece Cap, Eight Panel, Cabbie, Jay Gatsby (from The Great Gatsby), Fisherman's Cap, Pageboy, Applejack Hat, Lundberg Stetson, Chiz Hat and the Poor Boy Cap. It has the same overall shape and stiff peak in front as a flat cap, but the body of the cap is rounder, fuller, and paneled with a button on top, and often with a button attaching the front to the brim (as the flat cap sometimes has).Contents1 History 2 Resurgence 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The style was popular in Europe and North America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries among both boys and adult men. As the name suggests, it is now associated with newspaper boys. This gives rise to a misunderstanding. It is true that many newspaper boys and other working boys wore flat caps along with other styles
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