HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Bar Form
Bar form
Bar form
(German: die Barform or der Bar) is a musical form of the pattern AAB. Original use[edit] The term comes from the rigorous terminology of the Meistersinger guilds of the 15th to 18th century who used it to refer to their songs and the songs of the predecessors, the minnesingers of the 12th to 14th century. In their work, a Bar is not a single stanza (which they called a Liet or Gesätz); rather, it is the whole song. The word Bar is most likely a shortening of Barat, denoting a skillful thrust in fencing. The term was used to refer to a particularly artful song – the type one composes in songwriters' guilds. The AAB pattern does, however, describe each stanza in a Meistersinger's Bar, which is divided into two Stollen (A), which are collectively termed the Aufgesang, followed by an Abgesang
[...More...]

"Bar Form" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bar (form)
The form factor of a mobile phone is its size, shape, and style, as well as the layout and position of its major components. There are three major form factors – bar phones, flip phones, and sliders – as well as sub-categories of these forms and some atypical forms.Contents1 Bar1.1 Brick 1.2 Slate/Touchscreen1.2.1 Phablet2 Flip2.1 Dual-Screen3 Slider 4 Unusual form factors4.1 Swivel 4.2 Taco 4.3 Watch 4.4 Mixed 4.5 Multi-screen5 References 6 External linksBar[edit] A bar (also known as a slab, block, candybar) phone takes the shape of a cuboid,[1] usually with rounded corners and/or edges. The name is derived from the rough resemblance to a chocolate bar in size and shape. This form factor is widely used by a variety of manufacturers, such as Nokia
Nokia
and Sony Ericsson. Bar-type smartphones commonly have the screen and keypad on a single face
[...More...]

"Bar (form)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Movement (music)
A movement is a self-contained part of a musical composition or musical form. While individual or selected movements from a composition are sometimes performed separately, a performance of the complete work requires all the movements to be performed in succession. A movement is a section, "a major structural unit perceived as the result of the coincidence of relatively large numbers of structural phenomena."[1]A unit of a larger work that may stand by itself as a complete composition. Such divisions are usually self-contained. Most often the sequence of movements is arranged fast-slow-fast or in some other order that provides contrast. — Benward & Saker (2009), Music in Theory and Practice: Volume II[2]Sources[edit]^ Spencer, Peter; Peter M. Temko (1994). A Practical Approach to the Study of Form in Music. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press. p. 31. ISBN 9780881338065. OCLC 31792064
[...More...]

"Movement (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Cyclic Form
Cyclic form is a technique of musical construction, involving multiple sections or movements, in which a theme, melody, or thematic material occurs in more than one movement as a unifying device. Sometimes a theme may occur at the beginning and end (for example, in Mendelssohn's A minor String Quartet or Brahms's Symphony No. 3); other times a theme occurs in a different guise in every part (e.g. Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique, and Saint-Saëns's "Organ" Symphony). The technique has a complex history, having fallen into disuse in the Baroque
Baroque
and Classical eras, but steadily increasing in use during the nineteenth century (Randel 2003). The Renaissance cyclic mass, which incorporates a usually well-known portion of plainsong as a cantus firmus in each of its sections, is an early use of this principle of unity in a multiple-section form (Burkholder 2001)
[...More...]

"Cyclic Form" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Developing Variation
In music composition, developing variation is a formal technique in which the concepts of development and variation are united in that variations are produced through the development of existing material. Though the term was coined by Arnold Schoenberg, twentieth-century composer and inventor of the twelve-tone technique, he felt it was one of the most important compositional principles since around 1750:[1]Music of the homophonic-melodic style of composition, that is, music with a main theme, accompanied by and based on harmony, produces its material by, as I call it, developing variation
[...More...]

"Developing Variation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Drop (music)
A drop in popular music, especially electronic dance music styles, is a point in a music track where a sudden change of rhythm or bass line occurs, which typically is preceded by a build section and break.[1] According to NPR, a drop is the "...moment in a dance track when tension is released and the beat kicks in..., releasing the enormous energy accrued during a song's progression...after the momentum build, the pitch rising, the tension mounting, bigger, louder, until suddenly — the drop."[2] Billboard magazine defines a drop as the "...moment of instrumental build[-up] when the bass and rhythm hit hardest
[...More...]

"Drop (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Exposition (music)
In musical form and analysis, exposition is the initial presentation of the thematic material of a musical composition, movement, or section. The use of the term generally implies that the material will be developed or varied.In sonata form, the exposition is "the very first major section, incorporating at least one important modulation to the dominant or other secondary key and presenting the principal thematic material."[2] In a fugue, the exposition is "the statement of the subject in imitation by the several voices; especially the first such statement, with which the fugue begins."[3]Exposition in classical sonata form[edit] The term is most widely used[4] as an analytical convenience to denote a portion of a movement identified as an example of classical tonal sonata form
[...More...]

"Exposition (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Finale (music)
A finale is the last movement of a sonata, symphony, or concerto; the ending of a piece of non-vocal classical music which has several movements; or, a prolonged final sequence at the end of an act of an opera or work of musical theatre.[1] Michael Talbot wrote of the finales typical in sonatas: "The rondo is the form par excellence used for final movements, and ..
[...More...]

"Finale (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Formula Composition
Formula composition is a serially derived technique encountered principally in the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen, involving the projection, expansion, and Ausmultiplikation
Ausmultiplikation
of either a single melody-formula, or a two- or three-voice contrapuntal construction (sometimes stated at the outset). In contrast to serial music, where the st
[...More...]

"Formula Composition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Hook (music)
A hook is a musical idea, often a short riff, passage, or phrase, that is used in popular music to make a song appealing and to "catch the ear of the listener".[1] The term generally applies to popular music, especially rock, R&B, hip hop, dance, and pop. In these genres, the hook is often found in, or consists of, the chorus
[...More...]

"Hook (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Introduction (music)
In music, the introduction is a passage or section which opens a movement or a separate piece, preceding the theme or lyrics
[...More...]

"Introduction (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lick (music)
In popular music genres such as blues, jazz or rock music, a lick is "a stock pattern or phrase"[2] consisting of a short series of notes used in solos and melodic lines and accompaniment. Licks in rock and roll are often used through a formula, and variations technique in which variants of simple, stock ideas are blended and developed during the solo. In a jazz band, a lick may be performed during an improvised solo, either during an accompanied solo chorus or during an unaccompanied solo break. Jazz
Jazz
licks are usually original short phrases which can be altered so they can be used over a song's changing harmonic progressions. Similar concepts[edit] A lick is different from the related concept of a riff, as riffs can include repeated chord progressions. Licks are more often associated with single-note melodic lines than with chord progressions. However, like riffs, licks can be the basis of an entire song
[...More...]

"Lick (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Motif (music)
In music, a motif  (pronunciation) (help·info) is a short musical idea,[5] a salient recurring figure, musical fragment or succession of notes that has some special importance in or is characteristic of a composition: "The motive is the smallest structural unit possessing thematic identity".[3] The Encyclopédie de la Pléiade regards it as a "melodic, rhythmic, or harmonic cell", whereas the 1958 Encyclopédie Fasquelle maintains that it may contain one or more cells, though it remains the smallest analyzable element or phrase within a subject.[6] It is commonly regarded as the shortest subdivision of a theme or phrase that still maintains its identity as a musical idea
[...More...]

"Motif (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Overture
Overture (from French ouverture, lit. "opening") in music is the term originally applied to the instrumental introduction to an opera.[1] During the early Romantic era, composers such as Beethoven and Mendelssohn began to use the term to refer to independent, self-existing instrumental, programmatic works that presaged genres such as the symphonic poem. These were "at first undoubtedly intended to be played at the head of a programme".[1]Contents1 History1.1 17th century1.1.1 French overture 1.1.2 Italian overture1.2 18th century 1.3 19th-century opera2 Concert overture2.1 Early 19th century 2.2 Later 19th century 2.3 20th century3 Film 4 List of standard repertoire 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] 17th century[edit] The idea of an instrumental opening to opera existed during the 17th century
[...More...]

"Overture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Conclusion (music)
In music, the conclusion is the ending of a composition and may take the form of a coda or outro. Pieces using sonata form typically use the recapitulation to conclude a piece, providing closure through the repetition of thematic material from the exposition in the tonic key. In all musical forms other techniques include "altogether unexpected digressions just as a work is drawing to its close, followed by a return...to a consequently more emphatic confirmation of the structural relations implied in the body of the work."[1] For example:The slow movement of Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 2, where a "diminished-7th chord progression interrupts the final cadence."[1] The slow movement of Symphony No
[...More...]

"Conclusion (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Period (music)
In music, period refers to certain types of recurrence in small-scale formal structure. In twentieth-century music scholarship, the term is usually used as defined by the Oxford Companion to Music: "a period consists of two phrases, antecedent and consequent, each of which begins with the same basic motif." [3] Earlier usage varied somewhat, but usually referred to similar notions of symmetry, recurrence, and closure
[...More...]

"Period (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.