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Bani Hashim
Banū Hāshim (Arabic: بنو هاشم‎) is a clan in the Quraysh tribe with a unique maternal bloodline of Israelite
Israelite
ancestry through Salma bint Amr of Banu Najjar. This makes Banu Hashim
Banu Hashim
both an Ishmaelite and Israelite
Israelite
clan. The Islamic prophet, Muhammad
Muhammad
was a member of this Arab
Arab
tribe; his great-grandfather was Hashim ibn Abd Manaf, for whom the clan is named. Members of this clan are referred to as Hashemites
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Muhammad
Muhammad[n 1] (Arabic: محمد‎; pronounced [muħammad];[n 2] French: Mahomet /məˈhɒmɪt/; Latinized as Mahometus c. 570 CE – 8 June 632 CE)[1] was the founder of Islam.[2][3] According to Islamic doctrine, he was a prophet and God's messenger, sent to present and confirm the monotheistic teachings preached previously by Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.[3][4][5][6] He is viewed as the final prophet of God
God
in all the main branches of Islam, though some modern denominations diverge from this belief.[n 3] Muhamma
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Quraysh Tribe
The Quraysh
Quraysh
(Arabic: قريش‎) were a mercantile Arab
Arab
tribe that historically inhabited and controlled Mecca
Mecca
and its Ka'aba. The Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
was born into the Banu Hashim
Banu Hashim
clan of the Quraysh
Quraysh
tribe. The Quraysh
Quraysh
staunchly opposed Muhammad
Muhammad
until converting to Islam
Islam
en masse in 630 CE
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Muhammad In Islam
Muḥammad ibn ʿAbdullāh ibn ʿAbdul-Muṭṭalib ibn Hāshim (Arabic: مُـحَـمَّـد ابْـن عَـبْـد الله ابْـن عَـبْـد الْـمُـطَّـلِـب ابْـن هَـاشِـم‎) (c. 570 CE – 8 June 632 CE), in short form Muhammad, is considered to be the last Messenger and Prophet of God
God
in all the main branches of Islam
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Muhammad In The Bible
Muhammad[n 1] (Arabic: محمد‎; pronounced [muħammad];[n 2] French: Mahomet /məˈhɒmɪt/; Latinized as Mahometus c. 570 CE – 8 June 632 CE)[1] was the founder of Islam.[2][3] According to Islamic doctrine, he was a prophet and God's messenger, sent to present and confirm the monotheistic teachings preached previously by Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.[3][4][5][6] He is viewed as the final prophet of God
God
in all the main branches of Islam, though some modern denominations diverge from this belief.[n 3] Muhamma
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Judaism's Views On Muhammad
Very few texts in Judaism
Judaism
refer to or take note of the Islamic prophet, Muhammad
Muhammad
(Mukhammad). Some of them deny Muhammad's declaration of receiving divine revelations and call him a "false prophet".Contents1 Background 2 References to Muhammad2.1 Contemporaries 2.2 Maimonides 2.3 Natan'el al-Fayyumi 2.4 Midrash 2.5 Obscure and indirect references3 References 4 See alsoBackground[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)In Judaism, prophets were seen as having attained the highest degree of holiness, scholarship, and closeness to God and set the standards for human perfection
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Medieval Christian Views On Muhammad
During the Early Middle Ages, Christendom
Christendom
largely viewed Islam
Islam
as a Christological heresy and Muhammad
Muhammad
as a false prophet. By the Late Middle Ages, Islam
Islam
was more typically grouped with heathenism, and Muhammad
Muhammad
was viewed as inspired by the devil. A more relaxed or benign view of Islam
Islam
only developed in the modern period, after the Islamic empires ceased to be an acute military threat to Europe. See Orientalism. The earliest documented Christian knowledge of Muhammad
Muhammad
stems from Byzantine sources, written shortly after Muhammad's death in 632
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Historicity Of Muhammad
While the existence of the figure Muhammad
Muhammad
is certainly proven in contemporaneous historical records,[1][2] attempts to distinguish between the historical elements and the unhistorical elements of many of the reports of Muhammad
Muhammad
have not been very successful. The earliest Muslim source of information for the life of Muhammad
Muhammad
is the Quran, which gives very little information and whose historicity has been questioned.[3][4] Next in importance is the sīra literature and Hadith, which survive in the historical works of writers from the second, third, and fourth centuries of the Muslim era (c
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Criticism Of Muhammad
Criticism of Muhammad
Muhammad
has existed since the 7th century, when Muhammad was decried by his non- Muslim
Muslim
Arab
Arab
contemporaries for preaching monotheism. During the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
he was frequently seen in Christendom
Christendom
as a heretic, and/or possessed by demons
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Al-Masjid An-Nabawi
The Prophet's Mosque
Mosque
(Classical Arabic: ٱلْـمَـسْـجِـدُ ٱلـنَّـبَـوِيّ‎, Al-Masjidun-Nabawiyy; Modern Standard Arabic: ٱلْـمَـسْـجِـدْ اَلـنَّـبَـوِي‎, Al-Masjid An-Nabawī) is a mosque established and originally built by the Islamic prophet Muhammad, situated in the city of Medina
Medina
in the Hejazi region of Saudi Arabia. It was the third mosque built in the history of Islam,[a] and is now one of the largest mosques in the world. It is the second-holiest site in Islam, after the Great Mosque
Mosque
in Mecca.[8] It is always open, regardless of date or time. The site was originally adjacent to Muhammad's house; he settled there after his migration from Mecca
Mecca
to Medina
Medina
in 622 CE. He shared in the heavy work of construction. The original mosque was an open-air building
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Possessions Of Muhammad
Possession may refer to:Contents1 Law 2 Linguistics 3 Supernatural possession 4 Places 5 Arts and entertainment5.1 Literature 5.2 Film and television 5.3 Music6 Other 7 See alsoLaw[edit]Dependent territory, an area of land over which another country exercises sovereignty, but which does not have the full right of participation in that country's governance Drug possession, a crime Ownership Personal property, physical possessions belonging to a person Possession (law), exclusive practical control of a thing, in the context of the legal implications of that control Title (property)Linguistics[edit]Inalienable possession, relationship between two objects that is
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Relics Of Muhammad
Traditionally, Islam
Islam
has had a rich history of the veneration of relics, especially of those attributed to the Islamic
Islamic
prophet Muhammad.[1] There exists historical evidence that some of the earliest Muslims practiced the veneration of relics, and the practice continued to remain popular in many parts of the Sunni
Sunni
Islamic
Islamic
world until the eighteenth-century, when the reform movements of Salafism and Wahhabism
Wahhabism
began to staunchly condemn such practices due to their linking it with the sin of shirk (idolatry)
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Arabic Language
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Banu Najjar
The Banu Najjar[1] (Arabic: بنو نجّار) were a Jewish
Jewish
tribe that lived in Medina
Medina
in the time of Muhammad. The tribe is one of those named in Muhammed's Charter of Medina. They were also the tribe of Muhammad's great-grandmother Salma bint Amr. Muhammad
Muhammad
initially settled with them when he emigrated from Mecca
Mecca
to Medina
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Na`at
Na'at (Urdu: نعت‬‎) refers to poetry in praise of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
ﷺ. The practice is popular in South Asia (Bangladesh, Pakistan
Pakistan
and India), commonly in Pashto, Bengali, Urdu
Urdu
or Punjabi language. People who recite Naat are known as Naat Khawan
Naat Khawan
or sana'a-khua'an
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Ishmaelites
According to the Book of Genesis, Ishmaelites (Arabic: Bani Isma'il, Hebrew: Bnai Yishma'el) are the descendants of Ishmael, the elder son of Abraham
Abraham
and the descendants of the twelve sons and princes of Ishmael. In the Quran; "God has gifted all of Ishmael, Elisha, Jonah
Jonah
and Lot a favour above the nations".[1] "With some of their forefathers and their offspring and their brethren; and We chose them and guided them unto a straight path".[2]Contents1 Traditional origins 2 Historical records of the Ishmaelites 3 Genealogical attempt to trace the ancestry of the Arabs 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTraditional origins[edit] According to the Book of Genesis, Abraham's first wife was named Sarah and her Egyptian slave was named Hagar. However Sarah
Sarah
could not conceive
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