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Bangala Language
Bangala is a Bantu language
Bantu language
spoken in the northeast corner of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan
South Sudan
and the extreme western part of Uganda. A divergent form of Lingala, it is used as a lingua franca by people with different languages and rarely as a first language. The estimated number of speakers varies between 2 and 3.5 million.[4] It is spoken to the east and northeast of the area where Lingala
Lingala
is spoken.Contents1 History 2 Characteristics 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] As Lingala
Lingala
spread east and north, its vocabulary was replaced more and more by tribal and regional languages, and it became more of an interlanguage (a language that is a mix of two or more languages) and was classified as a separate language – Bangala
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Guthrie Classification Of Bantu Languages
Classification is a general process related to categorization, the process in which ideas and objects are recognized, differentiated, and understood. A classification system is an approach to accomplishing classification. Classification may refer specifically to:Contents1 Mathematics 2 Media 3 Science 4 Business, organizations, and economics 5 Other uses 6 Organizations involved in classification 7 See also 8 External linksMathematics[edit]Statistical classification, identifying to which of a set of categories a new observation belongs, on the basis of a training set of data Mathematical classificatio
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Ethnologue
Ethnologue: Languages of the World (stylized as Ethnoloɠue) is an annual reference publication in print and online that provides statistics and other information on the living languages of the world. It was first issued in 1951, and is now published annually by SIL International, a U.S.-based, worldwide, Christian non-profit organization. SIL's main purpose is to study, develop and document languages to promote literacy and for religious purposes
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Interlanguage
An interlanguage is an idiolect that has been developed by a learner of a second language (or L2) which preserves some features of their first language (or L1), and can also overgeneralize some L2 writing and speaking rules. These two characteristics of an interlanguage result in the system's unique linguistic organization. An interlanguage is idiosyncratically based on the learners' experiences with the L2. It can "fossilize", or cease developing, in any of its developmental stages. The interlanguage rules are claimed to be shaped by several factors, including L1-transfer, previous learning strategies, strategies of L2 acquisition (i.e., simplification), L2 communication strategies (i.e., circumlocution), and overgeneralization of L2 language patterns. Interlanguage is based on the theory that there is a dormant psychological framework in the human brain that is activated when one attempts to learn a second language
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Lingua Franca
A lingua franca (/ˌlɪŋɡwə ˈfræŋkə/ (listen); lit. Frankish tongue),[1] also known as a bridge language, common language, trade language, auxiliary language, vehicular language, or link language is a language or dialect systematically used to make communication possible between groups of people who do not share a native language or dialect, particularly when it is a third language that is distinct from both of the speakers' native languages.[2] Lingua francas have developed around the world throughout human history, sometimes for commercial reasons (so-called "trade languages" facilitated trade), but also for cultural, religious, diplomatic and administrative convenience, and as a means of exchanging information between scientists and other scholars of different nationalities.[3][4] The term is taken from the medieval Mediterranean Lingua Franca, a Romance-based pidgin language used (especially by traders and seamen) as a lingua franca
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African French
African French
African French
(French: français africain) is the generic name of the varieties of a French language
French language
spoken by an estimated 120 million people in Africa
Africa
spread across 24 francophone countries.[3] This includes those who speak French as a first or second language in these 31 francophone African countries (dark blue on the map), but it does not include French speakers living in non-francophone African countries. Africa
Africa
is thus the continent with the most French speakers in the world.[3] French arrived in Africa
Africa
as a colonial language. These African French
African French
speakers are now a large part of the Francophonie. In Africa, French is often spoken alongside indigenous languages, but in some areas it has become a first language, such as in the region of Abidjan, Ivory Coast[4] or Libreville, Gabon
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Uganda
Coordinates: 1°N 32°E / 1°N 32°E / 1; 32 Republic
Republic
of Uganda[1]Jamhuri ya Uganda  (Swahili) Flag Coat of arms Motto: "For God and My Country""kwa mungu na nchi yangu"Anthem: "Oh Uganda, Land of Beauty" Location of Uganda (dark blue)– in Africa (light blue & dark grey)– in the African Union (light blue)Capitaland largest cityKampalaOfficial languagesEnglishSwahili[2]Demonym(s)Ugandan[3]GovernmentUnitary dominant-party p
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South Sudan
Coordinates: 8°N 30°E / 8°N 30°E / 8; 30 Republic
Republic
of South SudanFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Justice, Liberty, Prosperity"Anthem: "South Sudan
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Bantu Language
The Bantu languages
Bantu languages
(/ˈbæntuː/;[2] technically the Narrow Bantu languages, as opposed to "Wide Bantu", a loosely defined categorization which includes other Bantoid languages) constitute a traditional branch of the Niger–Congo languages. There are about 250 Bantu languages
Bantu languages
by the criterion of mutual intelligibility,[3] though the distinction between language and dialect is often unclear, and Ethnologue
Ethnologue
counts 535 languages.[4][not in citation given] Bantu languages are largely spoken east and south of present-day Cameroon, that is, in the regions commonly known as Central Africa, Southeast Africa
Africa
and Southern Africa
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Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
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ISO 639-3
ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1] ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages
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Provinces Of The Democratic Republic Of The Congo
There are currently 26 provinces in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.[1] The capital, Kinshasa, is a city-province.[2][3]Contents1 History1.1 Maps 1.2 Approximate correspondence between historical and current provinces2 See also 3 References 4 BibliographyHistory[edit] When Belgium annexed the Belgian Congo
Belgian Congo
as a colony in 1908, it was initially organised into 22 districts. Ten western districts were administered directly by the main colonial government, while the eastern part of the colony was administered under two vice-governments: eight northeastern districts formed Orientale Province, and four southeastern districts formed Katanga. In 1919, the colony was organised into four provinces:Congo-Kasaï (five southwestern districts), Équateur
Équateur
(five northwestern districts), Orientale and Katanga (previous vice-governments).[2]In 1932, the colony was reorganised into six provinces
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Bantu Languages
The Bantu languages
Bantu languages
(/ˈbæntuː/)[2] (technically the Narrow Bantu languages, as opposed to "Wide Bantu", a loosely defined categorization which includes other Bantoid languages) constitute a traditional branch of the Niger–Congo languages. There are about 250 Bantu languages
Bantu languages
by the criterion of mutual intelligibility,[3] though the distinction between language and dialect is often unclear, and Ethnologue
Ethnologue
counts 535 languages.[4][not in citation given] Bantu languages are largely spoken east and south of present-day Cameroon, that is, in the regions commonly known as Central Africa, Southeast Africa
Africa
and Southern Africa
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Bantoid Languages
Bantoid is a putative major division of the Benue–Congo
Benue–Congo
branch of the Niger–Congo language
Niger–Congo language
family. It consists of the Mambiloid languages (including two outlying languages sometimes not included in Mambiloid, Ndoro and Fam), the Dakoid languages
Dakoid languages
and the Tikar language, all in Nigeria
Nigeria
and Cameroon, and the Southern Bantoid languages, a major division which also includes the Bantu languages spoken across most of Africa The term "Bantoid" was first used by Krause in 1895 for languages that showed resemblances in vocabulary to Bantu. Joseph Greenberg, in his 1963 The Languages of Africa, defined Bantoid as the group to which Bantu belongs together with its closest relatives; this is the sense in which the term is still used today
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Benue–Congo Languages
Benue–Congo (sometimes called East Benue–Congo) is a major subdivision of the Niger–Congo language family
Niger–Congo language family
which covers most of Sub-Saharan Africa
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Atlantic–Congo Languages
The Atlantic–Congo languages
Atlantic–Congo languages
are a major division constituting the core of the Niger–Congo language family
Niger–Congo language family
of Africa, characterised by the noun class systems typical of the family. They comprise all of Niger–Congo except Mande, Dogon, Ijoid and the Katla and Rashad languages (previously classified as Kordofanian)
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