HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Banchory Railway Station
Banchory
Banchory
railway station was situated on the Aberdeen and Ballater branch (the Deeside Line). It was situated at 16 miles 72 chains (27.2 km) from Aberdeen, and was the terminus of the railway from its opening on 8 September 1853 until extension to Aboyne in 1859. The branch was extended to its final terminus at Ballater in 1866. The station was reconstructed in 1902, and was substantially built, with stone main buildings and generous platform awnings. There was a goods yard on the down side of the line By the time of closure all passenger services on the branch were worked by diesel multiple-unit trains, after an experiment with battery-electric railcars in 1958 – 1962. Latterly there were five passenger services in each direction, with an additional train in the summer months
[...More...]

"Banchory Railway Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Banchory
Banchory
Banchory
(Scots: Banchry,[2] from Scottish Gaelic: Beannchar) is a burgh or town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. It is about 18 miles west of Aberdeen, near where the Feugh River
Feugh River
meets the River Dee.Contents1 Overview 2 Land use 3 Churches 4 Tourism and culture 5 Famous People from Banchory 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] The name is thought to be derived from an early Christian settlement founded by St Ternan. It is claimed that Ternan was a follower of St Ninian. Tradition has it that he established his settlement on the banks of the River Dee on what was later to become the kirkyard of the medieval parish of Banchory-Ternan.[3] The village and parish retained the name until the 1970s. The original Gaelic form is almost identical to that of Bangor, of similar meaning, and also the site of a monastery, in Northern Ireland. Relics associated with St
[...More...]

"Banchory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aberdeenshire
Aberdeenshire
Aberdeenshire
(Scottish Gaelic: Siorrachd Obar Dheathain) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland. It takes its name from the old County of Aberdeen
Aberdeen
which had substantially different boundaries. Modern Aberdeenshire
Aberdeenshire
includes all of what was once Kincardineshire, as well as part of Banffshire. The old boundaries are still officially used for a few purposes, namely land registration and lieutenancy.[1] Aberdeenshire
Aberdeenshire
Council is headquartered at Woodhill House, in Aberdeen, making it the only Scottish council whose headquarters are located outside its jurisdiction. Aberdeen
Aberdeen
itself forms a different council area ( Aberdeen
Aberdeen
City)
[...More...]

"Aberdeenshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Battery Electric Multiple Unit
A battery electric multiple unit, battery electric railcar or accumulator railcar is an electrically driven multiple unit or railcar whose energy is derived from rechargeable batteries that drive its traction motors. The main advantage of these vehicles is that they do not use fossil fuels like coal or diesel fuel, emit no exhaust gases and do not require the railway to have expensive infrastructure like electric ground rails or overhead catenary. On the down side is the weight of the batteries, which raises the vehicle weight, and their range before recharging of between 300 and 600 kilometres. Currently, battery electric units have a higher purchase price and running cost than petrol or diesel railcars, needing one or more charging stations along the routes they operate. Battery technology has greatly improved over the past 20 years broadening the scope of use of battery trains, moving away from limited niche applications
[...More...]

"Battery Electric Multiple Unit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ballater Railway Station
Ballater railway station is a former station in the village of Ballater in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The station was formerly the terminus of a branch line from Aberdeen.[1] It was the nearest station to Balmoral Castle, a personal residence of the British monarch.Contents1 History 2 Services 3 Use following closure 4 Fire 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] Opened by the Great North of Scotland Railway it became part of the London and North Eastern Railway during the Grouping of 1923, passing on to the Scottish Region of British Railways during the nationalisation of 1948. It was then closed by the British Railways Board in 1966 (as part of the "Beeching cuts").In August 1912, Ballater railway station played an important role when the body of Alexander Duff, 1st Duke of Fife, the son-in-law of King Edward VII, was transferred to Mar Lodge, Braemar, from St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle
[...More...]

"Ballater Railway Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Aboyne Railway Station
Aboyne railway station was a station which served Aboyne in the Scottish county of Aberdeenshire. It was served by trains on the line from Aberdeen to Ballater.Contents1 History 2 The site today 3 References3.1 Notes 3.2 SourcesHistory[edit] Opened as an extension to the Deeside Railway on 2 December 1859,[1] being the terminus until the line to Ballater was opened by the Aboyne and Braemar Railway in 1866. Later to be leased and then part of the Great North of Scotland Railway the station became part of the London and North Eastern Railway during the Grouping of 1923, passing on to the Scottish Region of British Railways during the nationalisation of 1948
[...More...]

"Aboyne Railway Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aberdeen Railway Station
Aberdeen
Aberdeen
railway station is the only railway station in Aberdeen, Scotland. It is the busiest railway station in Scotland
Scotland
north of the major cities of Glasgow
Glasgow
and Edinburgh. It is located on Guild Street in the city centre, next to Union Square. The station is managed by Abellio ScotRail
[...More...]

"Aberdeen Railway Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

List Of Closed Railway Stations In Britain
The list of closed railway stations in Britain includes the year of closure if known. Stations reopened as heritage railways continue to be included in this list and some have been linked. Some stations have been reopened to passenger traffic
[...More...]

"List Of Closed Railway Stations In Britain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Scottish Region Of British Railways
The Scottish Region (ScR) was one of the six regions created on British Railways
British Railways
(BR) and consisted of ex-London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) and ex- London and North Eastern Railway
London and North Eastern Railway
(LNER) lines in Scotland. It existed from the creation of BR in 1948, and was renamed to ScotRail in the mid-1980s (see separate entity for details).Contents1 History 2 The network 3 The Beeching cuts 4 Trains and rolling stock4.1 Main public services 4.2 Heritage operations5 Major accidents 6 Privatisation 7 References 8 Further readingHistory[edit] World War II
World War II
had seriously disrupted Scotland's railways due to the LMS and LNER rolling stock in Scotland
Scotland
being transferred to the major cities in Northern England
Northern England
in order to replace what had been destroyed by German air-raids
[...More...]

"Scottish Region Of British Railways" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

London And North Eastern Railway
The London
London
and North Eastern Railway (LNER) was the second largest (after LMS) of the "Big Four" railway companies created by the Railways Act 1921
Railways Act 1921
in Britain. It operated from 1 January 1923 until nationalisation on 1 January 1948
[...More...]

"London And North Eastern Railway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Great North Of Scotland Railway
The Great North of Scotland Railway
Great North of Scotland Railway
(GNSR/GNoSR) was one of the two smallest of the five major Scottish railway companies prior to the 1923 Grouping, operating in the north-east of the country. Formed in 1845, it carried its first passengers the 39 miles (63 km) from Kittybrewster, in Aberdeen, to Huntly
Huntly
on 20 September 1854. By 1867 it owned 226 1⁄4 route miles (364.1 km) of line and operated over a further 61 miles (98 km). The early expansion was followed by a period of forced economy, but in the 1880s the railway was refurbished, express services began to run and by the end of that decade there was a suburban service in Aberdeen
[...More...]

"Great North Of Scotland Railway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
[...More...]

"Ordnance Survey National Grid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.