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Ballyshannon
Ballyshannon
Ballyshannon
(Irish: Béal Átha Seanaidh, meaning "The Mouth of Seannach's ford") is a town in County Donegal, Ireland. Located at the southern end of the county where the N3 from Dublin
Dublin
ends and the N15 crosses the River Erne, it claims to be the oldest town in Ireland.[6][7][8][9]Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Local attractions 4 Transport and communications 5 People 6 International relations6.1 Twin towns – Sister cities7 Sport 8 Schools 9 Adult education 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksLocation[edit] Ballyshannon
Ballyshannon
town centre.Ballyshannon, which means "The Mouth of Seannach's Ford", after a fifth-century warrior, Seannach, who was slain there, lies at the mouth of the river Erne. Just west of the town, the Erne widens and its waters meander over a long sandy estuary
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Partition Of Ireland
The partition of Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: críochdheighilt na hÉireann) was the division of the island of Ireland
Ireland
into two distinct jurisdictions, Northern Ireland
Ireland
and Southern Ireland. It took place on 3 May 1921 under the Government of Ireland
Ireland
Act 1920. Today the former is still known as Northern Ireland
Ireland
and forms part of the United Kingdom, while the latter is now a sovereign state also named Ireland
Ireland
and sometimes called the Republic
Republic
of Ireland. The Act of 1920 was intended to create two self-governing territories within Ireland, with both remaining within the United Kingdom. It also contained provisions for co-operation between the two territories and for the eventual reunification of Ireland
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Quartz
Quartz
Quartz
is a mineral composed of silicon and oxygen atoms in a continuous framework of SiO4 silicon–oxygen tetrahedra, with each oxygen being shared between two tetrahedra, giving an overall chemical formula of SiO2. Quartz
Quartz
is the second most abundant mineral in Earth's continental crust, behind feldspar.[7] Quartz
Quartz
crystals are chiral, and exist in two forms, the normal α-quartz and the high-temperature β-quartz. The transformation from α-quartz to β-quartz takes place abruptly at 573 °C (846 K). Since the transformation is accompanied by a significant change in volume, it can easily induce fracturing of ceramics or rocks passing through this temperature limit. There are many different varieties of quartz, several of which are semi-precious gemstones
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Dublin
Dublin
Dublin
(/ˈdʌblɪn/, Irish: Baile Átha Cliath[11] Irish pronunciation: [ˌbʲlʲɑː ˈclʲiə]) is the capital of and largest city in Ireland.[12][13] Dublin
Dublin
is located in the province of Leinster
Leinster
on the east coast of Ireland, at the mouth of the River Liffey and bordered on the South by the Wicklow Mountains
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Member Of Parliament
A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Ford (crossing)
A ford is a shallow place with good footing where a river or stream may be crossed by wading, or inside a vehicle getting its wheels wet.[1] A ford is mostly a natural phenomenon, in contrast to a low water crossing, which is an artificial bridge that allows crossing a river or stream when water is low.Contents1 Description1.1 Watersplash2 Location names 3 Famous battles3.1 In fiction4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit] A ford is a much cheaper form of river crossing than a bridge, but it may become impassable after heavy rain or during flood conditions. A ford is therefore normally only suitable for very minor roads (and for paths intended for walkers and horse riders etc.)
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Neolithic British Isles
The Neolithic
Neolithic
British Isles refers to the period of British, Irish and Manx history
Manx history
that spanned from circa 4000 to circa 2,500 BCE.[1] The final part of the Stone Age
Stone Age
in the British Isles, it was a part of the greater Neolithic, or "New Stone Age", across Europe. During the preceding Mesolithic
Mesolithic
period, the inhabitants of the British Isles had been Mesolithic
Mesolithic
European hunter-gatherers. Around 4000 BCE migrants began arriving from central Europe. Although the earliest indisputably acknowledged languages spoken in the British Isles belonged to the Celtic branch of the Indo-European family it is not known what language these early farming people spoke. These migrants brought new ideas, leading to a radical transformation of society and landscape that has been called the Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution
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Henry III Of England
Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272), also known as Henry of Winchester, was King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine from 1216 until his death.[1] The son of King John and Isabella of Angoulême, Henry assumed the throne when he was only nine in the middle of the First Barons' War. Cardinal Guala declared the war against the rebel barons to be a religious crusade and Henry's forces, led by William Marshal, defeated the rebels at the battles of Lincoln and Sandwich in 1217. Henry promised to abide by the Great Charter of 1225, which limited royal power and protected the rights of the major barons. His early rule was dominated first by Hubert de Burgh and then Peter des Roches, who re-established royal authority after the war. In 1230, the King attempted to reconquer the provinces of France that had once belonged to his father, but the invasion was a debacle
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Edward I Of England
Edward
Edward
I (17/18 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots (Latin: Malleus Scotorum), was King of England
King of England
from 1272 to 1307. Before his accession to the throne, he was commonly referred to as The Lord Edward.[1] He spent much of his reign reforming royal administration and common law. Through an extensive legal inquiry, Edward
Edward
investigated the tenure of various feudal liberties, while the law was reformed through a series of statutes regulating criminal and property law. Increasingly, however, Edward's attention was drawn towards military affairs. As the first son of Henry III, Edward
Edward
was involved early in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English barons. In 1259, he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford
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Church Of Ireland
The Church of Ireland
Church of Ireland
(Irish: Eaglais na hÉireann; Ulster-Scots: Kirk o Airlann[3]) is a Christian church
Christian church
in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican
Anglican
Communion. It is organised on an all-Ireland basis and is the second-largest Christian church
Christian church
on the island after the Catholic Church. Like other Anglican
Anglican
churches, it has retained elements of pre-Reformation practice, notably its episcopal polity, while rejecting the primacy of the Bishop of Rome. In theological and liturgical matters, it incorporates many principles of the Reformation, particularly those espoused during the English Reformation
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Vikings
Vikings
Vikings
(Old English: wicing—"pirate",[1] Danish and Bokmål: vikinger; Swedish and Nynorsk: vikingar; Icelandic: víkingar, from Old Norse) were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of northern, central, eastern and western Europe, during the late 8th to late 11th centuries.[2][3] The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to the inhabitants of Viking home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age
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Annals Of Ulster
The Annals
Annals
of Ulster (Irish: Annála Uladh) are annals of medieval Ireland. The entries span the years from A.D.
A.D.
431 to A.D.
A.D.
1540
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Inishmurray
Inishmurray
Inishmurray
(Irish: Inis Muireadheach, meaning "Muireadheach's island") is an uninhabited island situated 7 km (4 mi) off the coast of County Sligo, Ireland.Contents1 Geography 2 Etymology 3 History3.1 Monastery 3.2 Recent history4 See also 5 Literature 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] The island covers .9 square kilometres (0.3 sq mi). Etymology[edit] Inishmurray
Inishmurray
may be named after the early saint, Muiredach mac Echdach (fl. early 6th century) of Killala. History[edit] There are remains of an early Irish monastic settlement. Laisrén (Saint Molaise) Mac Decláin reputedly founded a monastery here in the 6th century. He was confessor of Saint Columba
Columba
(Colmcille) after the Battle of Cúl Dreimhne on the mainland nearby
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Devenish Island
Devenish or Devinish[1] (from Irish: Daimhinis, meaning "ox island") is an island in Lower Lough Erne, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. Aligned roughly north–south, it is about one and a quarter miles long and two-thirds of a mile wide. The main place to catch a ferry to the island is at Trory Point, just outside Enniskillen. Devenish Island is owned by the Kilravock Christian Trust.[2]Contents1 Features 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksFeatures[edit] Devenish contains one of the finest monastic sites in Northern Ireland. A round tower thought to date from the twelfth century is situated on the island, as are the walls of the Oratory of Saint Molaise who established the monastery in the 6th century,[3] on a pilgrim route to Croagh Patrick in County Mayo
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