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Ballade (forme Fixe)
Se la face ay pale, La cause est amer, C'est la principale Et tant m'est amer   Amer, qu'en la mer   Me voudroye voir;   Or, scet bien de voir   La belle a qui suis   Que nul bien avoir     Sans elle ne puis.Se ay pesante male De dueil a porter, Ceste amour est male Pour moy de porter;   Car soy deporter   Ne veult devouloir,   Fors qu'a son vouloir   Obeisse, et puis   Qu'elle a tel pouvoir,     Sans elle ne puis.C'est la plus reale Qu'on puist regarder, De s'amour leiale Ne me puis guarder,   Fol sui de agarder   Ne faire devoir   D'amours recevoir   Fors d'elle, je cuij;   Se ne veil douloir,     Sans elle ne puis.
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François Villon
François Villon
François Villon
(pronounced [fʁɑ̃swa vijɔ̃] in modern French; in fifteenth-century French, [frɑnswɛ vilɔn]), born in Paris in 1431 and disappeared from view in 1463, is the best known French poet of the late Middle Ages
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Andrew Lang
Andrew Lang
Andrew Lang
(31 March 1844 – 20 July 1912) was a Scottish poet, novelist, literary critic, and contributor to the field of anthropology. He is best known as a collector of folk and fairy tales. The Andrew Lang
Andrew Lang
lectures at the University of St Andrews
University of St Andrews
are named after him.Contents1 Biography 2 Scholarship2.1 Folklore
Folklore
and anthropology 2.2 Psychical research 2.3 Classical scholarship 2.4 Historian 2.5 Other writings3 Works3.1 To 1884 3.2 1885–1889 3.3 1890–1899 3.4 1900–1909 3.5 1910–1912 3.6 Posthumous 3.7 Andrew Lang's Fairy Books4 References 5 Relevant literature 6 External linksBiography[edit] Lang was born in Selkirk
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Poetry
Poetry
Poetry
(the term derives from a variant of the Greek term, poiesis, "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic[1][2][3] qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning. Poetry
Poetry
has a long history, dating back to the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. Early poems evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing, or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey. Ancient attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle's Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song and comedy
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Bar Form
Bar form
Bar form
(German: die Barform or der Bar) is a musical form of the pattern AAB. Original use[edit] The term comes from the rigorous terminology of the Meistersinger guilds of the 15th to 18th century who used it to refer to their songs and the songs of the predecessors, the minnesingers of the 12th to 14th century. In their work, a Bar is not a single stanza (which they called a Liet or Gesätz); rather, it is the whole song. The word Bar is most likely a shortening of Barat, denoting a skillful thrust in fencing. The term was used to refer to a particularly artful song – the type one composes in songwriters' guilds. The AAB pattern does, however, describe each stanza in a Meistersinger's Bar, which is divided into two Stollen (A), which are collectively termed the Aufgesang, followed by an Abgesang
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Wendy Cope
Wendy Cope, OBE (born 21 July 1945) is a contemporary English poet. She read history at St Hilda's College, Oxford. She now lives in Ely with her husband, the poet Lachlan Mackinnon.Contents1 Biography 2 Critical reception 3 Style 4 Bibliography4.1 Cope's poetry for adults 4.2 Collections of Cope's poetry for children 4.3 Limited editions and selections 4.4 Other publications5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Cope was born in Erith
Erith
in Kent
Kent
(now in the London Borough of Bexley), where her father Fred Cope was manager of the local Department store, Hedley Mitchell. She was educated at West Lodge Preparatory School in Sidcup and Farrington's School, Chislehurst
Chislehurst
in Kent
Kent
(now also in London).[1] Following her graduation from St Hilda's College, Cope spent fifteen years as a primary-school teacher
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Chant Royal
The Chant Royal is a poetic form that is a variation of the ballad form and consists of five eleven-line stanzas with a rhyme scheme a-b-a-b-c-c-d-d-e-d-E and a five-line envoi rhyming d-d-e-d-E or a seven-line envoi c-c-d-d-e-d-E. To add to the complexity, no rhyming word is used twice[1][2] It was introduced into French poetry in the 15th century by Christine de Pizan
Christine de Pizan
and Charles d'Orléans and was introduced into England towards the end of the 19th century as part of a general revival of interest in French poetic forms
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Stanza
In poetry, a stanza (/ˈstænzə/; from Italian stanza [ˈstantsa], "room") is a grouped set of lines within a poem, usually set off from other stanzas by a blank line or indentation.[1] Stanzas can have regular rhyme and metrical schemes, though stanzas are not strictly required to have either. There are many unique forms of stanzas. Some stanzaic forms are simple, such as four-line quatrains. Other forms are more complex, such as the Spenserian stanza. Fixed verse poems, such as sestinas, can be defined by the number and form of their stanzas. The term stanza is similar to strophe, though strophe sometimes refers to irregular set of lines, as opposed to regular, rhymed stanzas.[2] The stanza in poetry is analogous with the paragraph that is seen in prose; related thoughts are grouped into units.[3] In music, groups of lines are typically referred to as verses
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G. K. Chesterton
Gilbert Keith Chesterton, KC*SG (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936), better known as G. K. Chesterton, was an English writer,[2] poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, lay theologian, biographer, and literary and art critic. Chesterton is often referred to as the "prince of paradox".[3] Time magazine has observed of his writing style: "Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories—first carefully turning them inside out."[4] Chesterton is well known for his fictional priest-detective Father Brown,[5] and for his reasoned apologetics. Even some of those who disagree with him have recognised the wide appeal of such works as Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
and The Everlasting Man.[4][6] Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an "orthodox" Christian, and came to identify this position more and more with Catholicism, eventually converting to Catholicism from High Church Anglicanism
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Ode
An ode (from Ancient Greek: ᾠδή, translit. ōdḗ) is a type of lyrical stanza. It is an elaborately structured poem praising or glorifying an event or individual, describing nature intellectually as well as emotionally. A classic ode is structured in three major parts: the strophe, the antistrophe, and the epode. Different forms such as the homostrophic ode and the irregular ode also exist. Greek odes were originally poetic pieces performed with musical accompaniment. As time passed on, they gradually became known as personal lyrical compositions whether sung (with or without musical instruments) or merely recited (always with accompaniment). The primary instruments used were the aulos and the lyre (the latter was the most revered instrument to the ancient Greeks). There are three typical forms of odes: the Pindaric, Horatian, and irregular. Pindaric odes follow the form and style of Pindar
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Prince
A prince is a male ruler or member of a monarch's or former monarch's family. Prince
Prince
is also a title of nobility, often hereditary, in some European states. The feminine equivalent is a princess
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Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
Geoffrey Chaucer
(/ˈtʃɔːsər/; c. 1343 – 25 October 1400), known as the Father of English literature,[1] is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages. He was the first poet to be buried in Poets' Corner
Poets' Corner
of Westminster Abbey. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, and astronomer, composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten-year-old son Lewis, Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Among his many works are The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Legend of Good Women and Troilus
Troilus
and Criseyde
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Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Gabriel Charles Dante
Dante
Rossetti (12 May 1828 – 9 April 1882), generally known as Dante
Dante
Gabriel Rossetti (/ˈdænti ˈɡeɪbriəl rəˈzɛti/),[1] was a British poet, illustrator, painter and translator. He founded the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
in 1848 with William Holman Hunt
William Holman Hunt
and John Everett Millais. Rossetti was later to be the main inspiration for a second generation of artists and writers influenced by the movement, most notably William Morris
William Morris
and Edward Burne-Jones. His work also influenced the European Symbolists and was a major precursor of the Aesthetic movement. Rossetti's art was characterised by its sensuality and its medieval revivalism. His early poetry was influenced by John Keats
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Algernon Charles Swinburne
Algernon Charles Swinburne
Algernon Charles Swinburne
(5 April 1837 – 10 April 1909) was an English poet, playwright, novelist, and critic. He wrote several novels and collections of poetry such as Poems and Ballads, and contributed to the famous Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. Swinburne wrote about many taboo topics, such as lesbianism, cannibalism, sado-masochism, and anti-theism. His poems have many common motifs, such as the ocean, time, and death
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List Of Compositions By Guillaume De Machaut
This article presents a complete list of the musical works of Guillaume de Machaut. Works are organized by genre. The numbering scheme, from the classic edition of Machaut's works by Leo Schrade, does not represent chronology, since few of Machaut's works can be reliably dated. Since many titles are merely the first lines of the texts used, in different sources individual pieces may be referred to by slightly different titles. For example, R20 is known both as "Douce dame" and "Douce dame tant qui vivray". Furthermore, some of Machaut's works (most notably the motets) employ simultaneous performance of several different texts. In such cases, the title of the work lists all texts used, starting from the top voice. Machaut was the first composer to concentrate on self-anthologization of his works, supervising the creation of three complete-works manuscripts during his life. In the last manuscript, written c. 1370, the scribe wrote "Vesci l'ordinance que G
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