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Baldwin II, Count Of Flanders
Baldwin II (c. 865 – 10 September 918) was the second margrave (or count) of Flanders, ruling from 879 to 918. He was nicknamed the Bald (Calvus) after his maternal grandfather, King Charles the Bald.[1]Contents1 Life1.1 Early Years 1.2 Marriage 1.3 Rise to power 1.4 Death2 Family 3 References 4 Additional referencesLife[edit] Baldwin II was born around 865 to Baldwin I of Flanders
Baldwin I of Flanders
and Judith of Flanders, the great-granddaughter of Charlemagne.[2] Early Years[edit] The early years of Baldwin's rule were marked by a series of devastating Viking
Viking
raids into Flanders.[3] By 883 CE, he was forced to move north to Pagus
Pagus
Flandransis, which became the territory most closely associated with the Counts of Flanders.[3] Baldwin constructed a series of wooden fortifications at Saint-Omer, Bruges, Ghent, and Kortrijk
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Margrave Of Flanders
The Count
Count
of Flanders was the ruler or sub-ruler of the county of Flanders, beginning in the 9th century.[1] The title was held for a time by the Holy Roman Emperor
Holy Roman Emperor
and the King of Spain. During the French Revolution in 1790, the county of Flanders was annexed to France and the peerage ceased to exist. In the 19th century, the title was appropriated by Belgium and granted twice to younger sons of the King of the Belgians. The most recent holder died in 1983.[2] Although the early rulers, starting with Arnulf I, were sometimes referred to as margraves or marquesses, this alternate title largely fell out of use by the 12th century. Since then, the rulers of Flanders have only been referred to as Counts. The Counts of Flanders enlarged their estate through a series of diplomatic marriages. The counties of Hainaut, Namur, Béthune, Nevers, Auxerre, Rethel, Burgundy, and Artois were all acquired in this manner
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Jurisdiction
Jurisdiction
Jurisdiction
(from the Latin
Latin
ius, iuris meaning "law" and dicere meaning "to speak") is the practical authority granted to a legal body to administer justice within a defined field of responsibility, e.g., Michigan tax law. In federations like the United States, areas of jurisdiction apply to local, state, and federal levels; e.g. the court has jurisdiction to apply federal law. Colloquially it is used to refer to the geographical area to which such authority applies, e.g. the court has jurisdiction over all of Colorado
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West Francia
In medieval historiography, West Francia
Francia
(Latin: Francia
Francia
occidentalis) or the Kingdom of the West Franks
Franks
(regnum Francorum occidentalium) was the western part of Charlemagne's Empire, inhabited and ruled by the Germanic Franks
Franks
that forms the earliest stage of the Kingdom of France, lasting from about 840 until 987. West Francia
Francia
was formed out of the division of the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
in 843 under the Treaty of Verdun[1] after the death of Emperor Louis the Pious
Louis the Pious
and the east–west division which "gradually hardened into the establishment of separate kingdoms (...) of what we can begin to call Germany and France."[2] West Francia
Francia
extended further south than modern France, but it did not extend as far east
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East Francia
East Francia
Francia
(Latin: Francia
Francia
orientalis) or the Kingdom of the East Franks
Franks
(regnum Francorum orientalium) was a precursor of the Holy Roman Empire. A successor state of Charlemagne's empire, it was ruled by the Carolingian dynasty
Carolingian dynasty
until 911
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Arnulf Of Carinthia
Arnulf of Carinthia
Arnulf of Carinthia
(c
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Robertians
The Robertians, or Robertines, was the Frankish predecessor family of origin to the ruling houses of France; it emerged to prominence in the ancient Frankish kingdom of Austrasia
Austrasia
as early as the eighth century—in roughly the same region as present-day Belgium—and later emigrated to West Francia, between the Seine and the Loire rivers. The members were ‘forefathers’ of the Capetian dynasty. With fealty (sometimes mixed with rancor) to the Carolingians they held the power of West Francia
Francia
through the whole period of the Carolingian
Carolingian
Empire; and from 888 to 987 theirs was the last extant kingdom of that house until they were succeeded by their own (Robertian) lineage, the house of Capet. The family frequently named its sons Robert, including Robert of Hesbaye
Hesbaye
(c
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Odo, Count Of Paris
Odo (or Eudes) (c. 859/860 – 1 January 898) was the elected King of Francia
Francia
from 888 to 898 as the first king from the Robertian dynasty. Before assuming the kingship Odo had the titles of Duke of the Franks and Count of Paris. Origins[edit] Odo was the eldest son of Robert the Strong, Duke of the Franks, Marquis of Neustria
Neustria
and Count of Anjou. After his father's death in 866, Odo inherited his Marquis of Neustria
Neustria
title. Odo lost this title in 868 when king Charles the Bald
Charles the Bald
appointed Hugh the Abbot to the title. Odo regained it following the death of Hugh in 886. After 882 he held the post of Count of Paris
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Abbey Of Saint Bertin
The Abbey
Abbey
of St. Bertin was a Benedictine monastic abbey in Saint-Omer, France, which now in ruins that are open to the public. It was initially dedicated to St. Peter but was rededicated to its second abbot, St. Bertin. The abbey is known for its Latin
Latin
cartulary (Chartularium Sithiense) whose first part is attributed to St Folquin. The abbey was founded on the banks of the Aa in the 7th century by Bishop Audomar
Audomar
of Thérouanne, who is now better known as St. Omer. He sent the monks Bertin, Momelin, and Ebertram from Sithiu (now St-Omer) to proselytize among the pagans in the region. The abbey soon became one of the most influential monasteries in northern Europe and ranked in importance with Elnon (now St-Amand Abbey) and St. Vaast. Its library included the codex of the Leiden Aratea, from which two copies were made
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Artois
Artois
Artois
(French pronunciation: ​[aʁtwa]; adjective Artesian; Dutch: Artesië) is a region of northern France. Its territory has an area of around 4,000 km² and a population of about one million. Its principal cities are Arras
Arras
(Dutch: Atrecht), Saint-Omer, Lens, and Béthune.Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Notable residents 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLocation[edit] Artois
Artois
occupies the interior of the Pas-de-Calais
Pas-de-Calais
département,[1] the western part of which constitutes the former Boulonnais. Artois roughly corresponds to the arrondissements of Arras, Béthune, Saint Omer, and Lens, and the eastern part of the arrondissement of Montreuil
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Abbey Of St. Vaast
The Abbey
Abbey
of Saint-Vaast was a Benedictine monastery situated in Arras, département of Pas-de-Calais, France. The abbey was founded in 667. Saint Vedast, or Vaast (c. 453–540) was the first bishop of Arras
Arras
and later also bishop of Cambrai, and was buried in the old cathedral at Arras. In 667 Saint Auburt, seventh bishop of Arras, began to build an abbey for Benedictine monks on the site of a little chapel which Saint Vedast
Vedast
had erected in honour of Saint Peter. Vedast's relics were transferred to the new abbey, which was completed by Auburt's successor and generously endowed by King Theuderic III, who together with his wife was afterwards buried there. The Abbey
Abbey
of St. Vaast was of great importance amongst the monasteries of the Low Countries
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River Somme
The Somme is a river in Picardy, northern France. The name Somme comes from a Celtic word meaning "tranquility". The department Somme was named after this river. The river is 245 km (152 mi) long, from its source in the high ground of the former Forest of Arrouaise at Fonsommes
Fonsommes
near Saint-Quentin, to the Bay of the Somme, in the English Channel. It lies in the geological syncline which also forms the Solent
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Charles The Fat
Charles III (13 June 839 – 13 January 888), also known as Charles the Fat, was the Carolingian Emperor from 881 to 888. The youngest son of Louis the German
Louis the German
and Hemma, Charles was a great-grandson of Charlemagne. He was the second-last emperor of the Carolingian dynasty and the last to rule, briefly, over a re-united Frankish empire. Over his lifetime, Charles became ruler of the various kingdoms of Charlemagne's former Empire. Granted lordship over Alamannia
Alamannia
in 876, following the division of East Francia, he succeeded to the Italian throne upon the abdication of his older brother Carloman of Bavaria who had been incapacitated by a stroke. Crowned Emperor in 881 by Pope John VIII, his succession to the territories of his brother Louis the Younger (Saxony and Bavaria) the following year reunited the kingdom of East Francia
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Blandijnberg
The Blandijnberg
Blandijnberg
is a 29m high hill in the city center of Ghent
Ghent
in East Flanders, Belgium.Contents1 History 2 Cycling 3 References 4 See alsoHistory[edit] The Blandijnberg
Blandijnberg
was already inhabited in prehistoric times. In the 3rd century AD. there was a Gallo-Roman villa on the hill, owned by a person named Blandinus. In the 7th century, Saint Amand
Saint Amand
founded the Benedictine
Benedictine
Saint Peter's Abbey on top of the Blandijnberg. The area around the abbey was known as Sint-Pietersdorp (Saint Peter's Village). With the expansion of Ghent
Ghent
in the 13th century, the abbey was included in the walled city. At the end of the Ancien Régime, the church possessions on the Blandijnberg
Blandijnberg
were confiscated by the city
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Count Of Boulogne
The Count of Boulogne
Count of Boulogne
is a historical title in the kingdom of France. The city of Boulogne-sur-Mer
Boulogne-sur-Mer
became the center of the county of Boulogne during the ninth century. Little is known of the early counts, but the first held the title during the 11th century. Eustace II of Boulogne
Eustace II of Boulogne
accompanied William I of England (the Conqueror) during the Norman Conquest
Norman Conquest
in 1066 and fought on his side at the Battle of Hastings. His son, Eustace III, was a major participant in the First Crusade
First Crusade
with his younger brothers, Geoffrey and Baldwin (who later became king of Jerusalem)
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Adela Of Vermandois
Adele of Vermandois (bef. 915–960) was both a Carolingian as well as a Robertian Frankish noblewoman who was the Countess of Flanders (934–960).Contents1 Life 2 Ancestry 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Adele, born c. 910–915[1] was a daughter of Herbert II of Vermandois and his wife, Adele, daughter of Robert I of France.[2] She died in 960 in Bruges.[1] In 934 Adele married Count Arnulf I of Flanders (c. 890 – 965).[3] Together they had the following children:Hildegarde,[a] born c. 934, died 990; she married Dirk II, Count of Holland.[4] Liutgard, born in 935, died in 962; married Wichmann IV, Count of Hamaland.[3] Egbert, died 953.[3] Baldwin III of Flanders.[3] (c. 940 – 962). Married Mathilde Billung of Saxony (c. 940 - 1008), daughter of Hermann Billung, and had issue, Arnulf II, Count of Flanders (c
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