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BBC Radio 4
Web StreamFMWorldwide stream URL (HLS, 48 Kbps AAC+) Worldwide stream URL (MPEG DASH, 48 Kbps AAC+) Worldwide stream URL (HLS, 96 Kbps AAC+) Worldwide stream URL (HTTP, 128 Kbps MP3) UK-only stream URL (HLS, 128 Kbps AAC) UK-only stream URL (MPEG DASH, 128 Kbps AAC) UK-only stream URL (HLS, 320 Kbps AAC)LWWorldwide stream URL (HLS, 48 Kbps AAC+) Worldwide stream URL (MPEG DASH, 48 Kbps AAC+) Worldwide stream URL (HLS, 96 Kbps AAC+) Worldwide stream URL (HTTP, 128 Kbps MP3) UK-only stream URL (HLS, 128 Kbps AAC) UK-only stream URL (MPEG DASH, 128 Kbps AAC) UK-only stream URL (HLS, 320 Kbps AAC)Website BBC
BBC
Radio 4 BBC
BBC
Radio 4 is a radio station owned and operated by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) that broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history
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Popular Music
Popular music
Popular music
is music with wide appeal[1][2][3] that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and styles can be enjoyed and performed by people with little or no musical training.[1] It stands in contrast to both art music[4][5][6] and traditional or "folk" music. Art music
Art music
was historically disseminated through the performances of written music, although since the beginning of the recording industry, it is also disseminated through recordings
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Radio Format
A radio format or programming format (not to be confused with broadcast programming) describes the overall content broadcast on a radio station
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St Peter's College, Oxford
St Peter's College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and is located in New Inn Hall Street, Oxford, United Kingdom. It occupies the site of two of the university's oldest inns, both of which were founded in the 13th century. The modern college was founded as St Peter's Hall in 1929 by Francis James Chavasse, Bishop of Liverpool, and achieved full collegiate status in 1961, becoming St Peter's College. In 1979, it began to admit women. As of 2016, the college had an estimated financial endowment of £40.3 million.[2]Contents1 History 2 Buildings2.1 Accommodation3 Student life3.1 Sports4 Railway engine 5 People associated with the college5.1 Masters 5.2 Notable alumni6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] St Peter's occupies the site of two of the university's oldest inns, or medieval hostels: Bishop Trilleck's, later New Inn Hall, and Rose Hall
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Peabody Award
The George Foster Peabody
George Foster Peabody
Awards (or simply Peabody Awards) program, named for American businessman and philanthropist George Peabody, honor the most powerful, enlightening, and invigorating stories in television, radio, and online media. Programs are recognized in seven categories: news, entertainment, documentaries, children's programming, education, interactive programming, and public service. Peabody Award
Peabody Award
winners include radio and television stations, networks, online media, producing organizations, and individuals from around the world. Established in 1940 by a committee of the National Association of Broadcasters, the prestigious Peabody Award
Peabody Award
was created to honor excellence in radio broadcasting
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Southern England
Southern England, or the South of England, also known as the South, refers roughly to the southern counties of England. The extent of this area can take a number of different interpretations depending on the context, including geographical, cultural, political and economic. Geographically, the extent of the south of England
England
may vary from the southern quarter (below the M4/Northern M25), via one-third of the country (excluding central England), to the southern half, bordering northern England. The South is often considered a principal cultural area of England, along with the Midlands and Northern England
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The World At One
The world is the planet Earth
Earth
and all life upon it, including human civilization.[1] In a philosophical context, the "world" is the whole of the physical Universe, or an ontological world (the "world" of an individual). In a theological context, the world is the material or the profane sphere, as opposed to the celestial, spiritual, transcendent or sacred. The "end of the world" refers to scenarios of the final end of human history, often in religious contexts. History of the world
History of the world
is commonly understood as spanning the major geopolitical developments of about five millennia, from the first civilizations to the present
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Internet
The Internet
Internet
is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite
Internet protocol suite
(TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies
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Northern Europe
Northern Europe
Europe
is the general term for the geographical region in Europe
Europe
that is approximately north of the southern coast of the Baltic Sea. Nations usually included within this region are Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia
Latvia
and Lithuania, and occasionally Ireland, Britain, northern Germany, northern Belarus
Belarus
and northwest Russia. Narrower definitions may be based on other geographical factors such as climate and ecology. A broader definition would include the area north of the Alps
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
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Channel Islands
The Channel Islands
Channel Islands
(Norman: Îles d'la Manche, French: Îles Anglo-Normandes or Îles de la Manche[note 1]) are an archipelago in the English Channel, off the French coast of Normandy. They include two Crown dependencies: the Bailiwick of Jersey, the largest of the islands; and the Bailiwick of Guernsey, consisting of Guernsey, Alderney, Sark
Sark
and some smaller islands
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Isle Of Man
The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
(Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann (/mæn/; Manx: Mannin [ˈmanɪn]), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann
Lord of Mann
and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. Ranked by the World Bank
World Bank
as the 5th richest nation in the world by GDP per capita,[6] the largest sectors are insurance and eGaming with 17% of GNP each, followed by ICT and banking with 9% each.[7] The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BC. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged
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Radio Station
A radio station is a set of equipment necessary to carry on communication via radio waves. Generally, it is a receiver or transmitter, an antenna, and some smaller additional equipment necessary to operate them. Radio stations
Radio stations
play a vital role in communication technology as they are heavily relied on to transfer data and information across the world.[1] More broadly, the definition of a radio station includes the aforementioned equipment and a building in which it is installed. Such a station may include several "radio stations" defined above (i.e. several sets of receivers or transmitters installed in one building but functioning independently, and several antennas installed on a field next to the building). This definition of a radio station is more often referred to as a transmitter site, transmitter station, transmission facility or transmitting station
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Webcast
A webcast is a media presentation distributed over the Internet
Internet
using streaming media technology to distribute a single content source to many simultaneous listeners/viewers. A webcast may either be distributed live or on demand. Essentially, webcasting is "broadcasting" over the Internet. The largest "webcasters" include existing radio and TV stations, who "simulcast" their output through online TV or online radio streaming, as well as a multitude of Internet
Internet
only "stations". Webcasting usually consists of providing non-interactive linear streams or events
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Sister Station
In broadcasting, sister stations or sister channels are radio or television stations operated by the same company, by direct ownership or through a management agreement. Radio sister stations will often have different formats, and often one station is on the AM band while another is on the FM band. Conversely, several types of sister-station relationships exist in television; stations in the same city will usually be affiliated with different television networks (often one with a major network and the other with a secondary network), and may occasionally shift television programs between each other when local events require one station to interrupt its network feed. Sister stations in separate (but often nearby) cities owned by the same company may or may not share a network affiliation. For example, WNYW
WNYW
and WWOR-TV, in New York City
New York City
and Secaucus, New Jersey, are both owned by 21st Century Fox
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