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BBC Online
BBC
BBC
Online, formerly known as BBCi, is the BBC's online service. It is a large network of websites including such high-profile sites as BBC News and Sport, the on-demand video and radio services co-branded BBC iPlayer, the children's sites C BBC
BBC
and CBeebies, and learning services such as Bitesize
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House Of Lords
The House of Lords
House of Lords
of the United Kingdom, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster.[2] Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual
Lords Spiritual
and Temporal of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Unlike the elected House of Commons, all members of the House of Lords (excluding 90 hereditary peers elected among themselves and two peers who are ex officio members) are appointed.[3] The membership of the House of Lords
House of Lords
is drawn from the peerage and is made up of Lords Spiritual and Lords Temporal
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XML
In computing, Extensible Markup Language
Language
(XML) is a markup language that defines a set of rules for encoding documents in a format that is both human-readable and machine-readable. The W3C's XML
XML
1.0 Specification[2] and several other related specifications[3]—all of them free open standards—define XML.[4] The design goals of XML
XML
emphasize simplicity, generality, and usability across the Internet.[5] It is a textual data format with strong support via Unicode
Unicode
for different human languages
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Web Widget
In computing, a web widget is a software widget for the web. It's a small application with limited functionality that can be installed and executed within a web page by the user. A widget has the role of a transient or auxiliary application, meaning that it just occupies a portion of a webpage and does something useful with information fetched from other websites and displayed in place. Other terms used to describe web widgets include: portlet, web part, gadget, badge, module, snippet and flake. Widgets are typically created in DHTML or Adobe Flash. Widgets often take the form of on-screen devices such as clocks, event countdowns, auction-tickers, stock market tickers, flight arrival information, daily weather, phone books, pictures etc.. A widget is a stand-alone application that can be embedded into third party sites by any user on a page where they have rights of authorship, e.g. a webpage, blog,[1] or profile on a social media site
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Beta Version
A software release life cycle is the sum of the stages of development and maturity for a piece of computer software: ranging from its initial development to its eventual release, and including updated versions of the released version to help improve software or fix software bugs still present in the software.Contents1 History 2 Stages of development2.1 Pre-alpha 2.2 Alpha 2.3 Beta2.3.1 Open and closed beta2.4 Release candidate3 Release3.1 Release to manufacturing (RTM) 3.2 General availability (GA) 3.3 Release to web (RTW)4 Support4.1 End-of-life5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyHistory[edit] Usage of the "alpha/beta" test terminology originated at IBM. As long ago as the 1950s (and probably earlier), IBM used similar terminology for their hardware development. "A" test was the verification of a new product before public announcement. "B" test was the verification before releasing the product to be manufactured
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Alexa Internet
Alexa Internet, Inc. is an American company based in California
California
that provides commercial web traffic data and analytics. It is a subsidiary of Amazon. Founded as an independent company in 1996, Alexa was acquired by the company Amazon in 1999. Its toolbar collects data on Internet
Internet
browsing behavior and transmits them to the Alexa website, where they are stored and analyzed. This is the basis for the company's web traffic reporting
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URL
A Uniform Resource Locator (URL), colloquially termed a web address,[1] is a reference to a web resource that specifies its location on a computer network and a mechanism for retrieving it. A URL is a specific type of Uniform Resource Identifier (URI),[2] although many people use the two terms interchangeably.[3][a] URLs occur most commonly to reference web pages (http), but are also used for file transfer (ftp), email (mailto), database access (JDBC), and many other applications. Most web browsers display the URL of a web page above the page in an address bar
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Suffix
In linguistics, a suffix (sometimes termed postfix) is an affix which is placed after the stem of a word. Common examples are case endings, which indicate the grammatical case of nouns or adjectives, and verb endings, which form the conjugation of verbs. Particularly in the study of Semitic languages, suffixes are called afformatives, as they can alter the form of the words. In Indo-European studies, a distinction is made between suffixes and endings (see Proto-Indo-European root). Suffixes can carry grammatical information or lexical information. An inflectional suffix is sometimes called a desinence[1] or a grammatical suffix[2] or ending
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Prefix
A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word.[1] Adding it to the beginning of one word changes it into another word. For example, when the prefix un- is added to the word happy, it creates the word unhappy
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HTML
Hypertext
Hypertext
Markup Language (HTML) is the standard markup language for creating web pages and web applications. With Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and JavaScript, it forms a triad of cornerstone technologies for the World Wide Web.[4] Web browsers receive HTML
HTML
documents from a web server or from local storage and render the documents into multimedia web pages. HTML
HTML
describes the structure of a web page semantically and originally included cues for the appearance of the document. HTML
HTML
elements are the building blocks of HTML
HTML
pages. With HTML constructs, images and other objects such as interactive forms may be embedded into the rendered page. HTML
HTML
provides a means to create structured documents by denoting structural semantics for text such as headings, paragraphs, lists, links, quotes and other items
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BBC Charter
The BBC
BBC
Charter established the BBC
BBC
(British Broadcasting Corporation). An accompanying Agreement recognises its editorial independence and sets out its public obligations in detail. Each Charter has run for ten years. The most recent Charter took effect on 1 January 2017 and will run until 31 December 2027. [1] [2] References[edit]^ " BBC
BBC
Charter and Agreement". Retrieved 2017-08-06.  ^ "Copy of Royal Charter for the continuance of the British Broadcasting Corporation" (PDF). Retrieved 2017-08-06. External links[edit] BBC
BBC
Charter and AgreementThis BBC-related article is a stub
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John Birt
John Birt, Baron Birt (born 10 December 1944) is a British television executive and businessman. He is a former Director-General (1992–2000) of the BBC. After a successful career in commercial television, initially at Granada Television
Granada Television
and later at London Weekend Television, Birt was appointed Deputy Director-General of the BBC in 1987 for his expertise in current affairs. The forced departure of Director-General Alasdair Milne after pressure from the Thatcher government[1] required someone near the top, preferably from outside the BBC, with editorial and production experience (Milne had been summarily replaced by Michael Checkland, an accountant). During his tenure as Director-General, Birt restructured the BBC, in the face of much internal opposition. However, others have credited him with saving the corporation from possible government privatisation, and say he prepared for the era of digital broadcasting
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Bulletin Board
A bulletin board (pinboard, pin board, noticeboard, or notice board in British English) is a surface intended for the posting of public messages, for example, to advertise items wanted or for sale, announce events, or provide information. Bulletin boards are often made of a material such as cork to facilitate addition and removal of messages, as well as a writing surface such as blackboard or whiteboard. A bulletin board which combines a pinboard (corkboard) and writing surface is known as a combination bulletin board. Bulletin boards can also be entirely in the digital domain and placed on computer networks so people can leave and erase messages for other people to read and see, as in a bulletin board system. Bulletin boards are particularly prevalent at universities. They are used by many sports groups and extracurricular groups and anything from local shops to official notices
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Social Networking Site
A social networking service (also social networking site, SNS or social media) is an online platform that people use to build social networks or social relations with other people who share similar personal or career interests, activities, backgrounds or real-life connections. The variety of stand-alone and built-in social networking services currently available online introduces challenges of definition; however, some common features exist:[1][2]social networking services are Internet-based applications[1][2][3] user-generated content (UGC) is the lifeblood of SNS organisations.[2][4] Online community services are sometimes considered[by whom?] social-network services, though in a broader sense, a social-network service usually provides an individual-centered service whereas online community services are group-centered
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JSON
In computing, JavaScript
JavaScript
Object Notation or JSON
JSON
(/ˈdʒeɪsən/ JAY-sən)[1] is an open-standard file format that uses human-readable text to transmit data objects consisting of attribute–value pairs and array data types (or any other serializable value). It is a very common data format used for asynchronous browser–server communication, including as a replacement for XML
XML
in some AJAX-style systems.[2] JSON
JSON
is a language-independent data format. It was derived from JavaScript, but as of 2017[update] many programming languages include code to generate and parse JSON-format data. The official Internet media type for JSON
JSON
is application/json
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IGoogle
i Google
Google
(formerly Google
Google
Personalized Homepage) was a customizable Ajax-based start page or personal web portal launched by Google
Google
in May 2005
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