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BATCO
BATCO, short for Battle Code, is a hand-held, paper-based encryption system used at a low, front line (platoon, troop and section) level in the British Army. It was introduced along with the Clansman
Clansman
combat net radio in the early 1980s and was largely obsolete by 2010 due to the wide deployment of the secure Bowman radios. BATCO
BATCO
consists of a code, contained on a set of vocabulary cards, and cipher sheets for superencryption of the numeric code words. The cipher sheets, which are typically changed daily, also include an authentication table and a radio call sign protection system. BATCO
BATCO
is similar to older Slidex
Slidex
system. The use of BATCO
BATCO
is still taught to Royal Signals Communication Systems Operators as a back-up should secure equipment fail or be unavailable
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Encryption
In cryptography, encryption is the process of encoding a message or information in such a way that only authorized parties can access it and those who are not authorized cannot. Encryption
Encryption
does not itself prevent interference, but denies the intelligible content to a would-be interceptor. In an encryption scheme, the intended information or message, referred to as plaintext, is encrypted using an encryption algorithm – a cipher – generating ciphertext that can be read only if decrypted. For technical reasons, an encryption scheme usually uses a pseudo-random encryption key generated by an algorithm. It is in principle possible to decrypt the message without possessing the key, but, for a well-designed encryption scheme, considerable computational resources and skills are required
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Royal Signals Trades
The Royal Signals
Royal Signals
trades are the employment specialisations of the Royal Corps of Signals
Royal Corps of Signals
in the British Army. Every soldier in the Corps is trained both as a field soldier and a tradesman
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Dryad
A dryad (/ˈdraɪ.æd/; Greek: Δρυάδες, sing.: Δρυάς) is a tree nymph or tree spirit in Greek mythology
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Procedure Word
Procedure words or prowords are words or phrases limited to radio telephone procedure used to facilitate communication by conveying information in a condensed standard verbal format.[1] Prowords are voice versions of the much older prosigns for Morse code first developed in the 1860s for Morse telegraphy, and their meaning is identical. The U.S. military communications manual ACP-125[2] contains the most formal and perhaps earliest modern (post-WW-II) glossary of procedure words, but its definitions have been adopted by many other organizations, including the United Nations Development Programme,[3] the U.S. Coast Guard,[4] the Rhode Island Department of Emergency Management,[5] Civil Air Patrol,[6] Military Auxiliary Radio System,[7] and others. Procedure words are one of several structured parts of radio voice procedures, including Brevity codes and Plain language radio checks. The vast majority of the brevity codes from the U.S
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A5 Paper Size
ISO 216
ISO 216
specifies international standard (ISO) paper sizes used in most countries in the world today, although not in Canada, the United States, Mexico, or the Dominican Republic. The standard defines the "A" and "B" series of paper sizes, including A4, the most commonly available size. Two supplementary standards, ISO 217 and ISO 269, define related paper sizes; the ISO 269
ISO 269
"C" series is commonly listed alongside the A and B sizes. All ISO 216, ISO 217 and ISO 269
ISO 269
paper sizes (except some envelopes) have the same aspect ratio, 2 displaystyle sqrt 2 , within rounding to millimetres. This ratio has the unique property that when cut or folded in half width-wise, the halves also have the same aspect ratio
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Combined Cadet Force
The Combined Cadet Force
Combined Cadet Force
(CCF) is a Ministry of Defence sponsored youth organisation in the United Kingdom. Its aim is to "provide a disciplined organisation in a school so that pupils may develop powers of leadership by means of training to promote the qualities of responsibility, self reliance, resourcefulness, endurance and perseverance". It is not a pre-service organisation, although it acknowledges that one of its objectives is "to encourage those who have an interest in the services to become Officers of the Regular or Reserve Forces", and a significant number of officers have indeed had experience in the CCF
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Army Cadet Force
The Army Cadet Force
Army Cadet Force
(ACF) is a national youth organisation sponsored by the United Kingdom's Ministry of Defence and the British Army. Along with the Sea Cadet Corps
Corps
and the Air Training Corps, the ACF make up the Community Cadet Forces. It is a separate organisation from the Combined Cadet Force
Combined Cadet Force
which provides similar training within principally independent schools. Although sponsored by the Ministry of Defence, the ACF is not part of the British Army
British Army
or Army Reserve, and as such cadets are not subject to military 'call up'
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Royal Corps Of Signals
The Royal Corps of Signals
Royal Corps of Signals
(often simply known as the Royal Signals - abbreviated to R SIGNALS) is one of the combat support arms of the British Army. Signals units are among the first into action, providing the battlefield communications and information systems essential to all operations. Colloquially referred to by some as "Siggies", Royal Signals units provide the full telecommunications infrastructure for the Army wherever they operate in the world
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Call Sign
In broadcasting and radio communications, a call sign (also known as a call name or call letters—and historically as a call signal—or abbreviated as a call) is a unique designation for a transmitter station. In the United States of America, they are used for all FCC-licensed transmitters.[1] A call sign can be formally assigned by a government agency, informally adopted by individuals or organizations, or even cryptographically encoded to disguise a station's identity. The use of call signs as unique identifiers dates to the landline railroad telegraph system. Because there was only one telegraph line linking all railroad stations, there needed to be a way to address each one when sending a telegram. In order to save time, two-letter identifiers were adopted for this purpose. This pattern continued in radiotelegraph operation; radio companies initially assigned two-letter identifiers to coastal stations and stations aboard ships at sea
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Superencryption
Multiple encryption
Multiple encryption
is the process of encrypting an already encrypted message one or more times, either using the same or a different algorithm. It is also known as cascade encryption, cascade ciphering, multiple encryption, and superencipherment. Superencryption refers to the outer-level encryption of a multiple encryption.Contents1 Independent keys 2 Importance of the first layer 3 The Rule of Two 4 Example of Multiple Encryption 5 References 6 Further readingIndependent keys[edit] Picking any two ciphers, if the key used is the same for both, the second cipher could possibly undo the first cipher, partly or entirely. This is true of ciphers where the decryption process is exactly the same as the encryption process—the second cipher would completely undo the first
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Code
In communications and informationtter, word, sound, image, or gesture—into another form or representation, sometimes [[data compress or secret, for communication through a communication channel or storage in a storage medium. An early example is the invention of language which enabled a perso, through speech, to communicate what he or she saw, heard, felt, or thought to others. But speech limits the range of communication to the distance a voice can carry, and limits the audience to those present when the speech is uttered. The invention of writing, which converted spoken language into visual symbols, extended the range of communication across space and time. The process of encoding converts information from a source into symbols for communication or storage
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Navajo Code
Code
Code
talkers are people in the 20th century who used obscure languages as a means of secret communication during wartime. The term is now usually associated with the United States service members during the world wars who used their knowledge of Native American languages as a basis to transmit coded messages. In particular, there were approximately 400–500 Native Americans in the United States
Native Americans in the United States
Marine Corps whose primary job was the transmission of secret tactical messages. Code
Code
talkers transmitted these messages over military telephone or radio communications nets using formal or informally developed codes built upon their native languages
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Chaocipher
The Chaocipher [1] is a cipher method invented by J. F. Byrne in 1918 and described in his 1953 autobiographical Silent Years.[2] He believed Chaocipher was simple, yet unbreakable. Byrne stated that the machine he used to encipher his messages could be fitted into a cigar box. He offered cash rewards for anyone who could solve it. In May 2010 the Byrne family donated all Chaocipher-related papers and artifacts[3] to the National Cryptologic Museum
National Cryptologic Museum
in Ft. Meade, Maryland, USA
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Transposition Cipher
In cryptography, a transposition cipher is a method of encryption by which the positions held by units of plaintext (which are commonly characters or groups of characters) are shifted according to a regular system, so that the ciphertext constitutes a permutation of the plaintext. That is, the order of the units is changed (the plaintext is reordered). Mathematically a bijective function is used on the characters' positions to encrypt and an inverse function to decrypt. Following are some implementations.Contents1 Rail Fence cipher 2 Route cipher 3 Columnar transposition 4 Double transposition 5 Myszkowski transposition 6 Disrupted transposition 7 Grilles 8 Scytale 9 Detection and cryptanalysis 10 Combinations 11 Fractionation 12 See also 13 Notes 14 ReferencesRail Fence cipher[edit] The Rail Fence cipher is a form of transposition cipher that gets its name from the way in which it is encoded
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