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B. Dalton
B. Dalton
B. Dalton
Bookseller (often called B. Dalton
B. Dalton
or B. Dalton's) was an American retail bookstore chain founded in 1966 by Bruce Dayton, a member of the same family that operated the Dayton's
Dayton's
department store chain.[1] B. Dalton
B. Dalton
expanded to become the largest retailer of hardcover books in the United States, with 798 stores at the peak of the chain's success.[1] Located primarily in shopping malls, B. Dalton
B. Dalton
competed primarily with Waldenbooks
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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PBS
The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is an American public broadcaster and television program distributor.[2] It is a non-profit organization and is the most prominent provider of government-funded educational television programming to public television stations in the United States, distributing series such as Keeping Up Appearances, BBC World News
BBC World News
(as BBC World News
BBC World News
America since 2012), Nova ScienceNow, Nova, Arthur, Sesame Street, PBS
PBS
NewsHour, Walking with Dinosaurs, Masterpiece, Nature, Rick Steves' Europe, American Masters, Frontline, and Antiques Roadshow. PBS
PBS
is funded by member station dues, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, government agencies, corporations, foundations and individual citizens
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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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Roosevelt Field Mall
Roosevelt Field Mall is a shopping mall in East Garden City, Long Island, New York.[1] It is the second-largest full price shopping mall in the state of New York, following Destiny USA
Destiny USA
in Syracuse, and tenth in the country as measured by gross leasable area at 2,400,000 square feet (220,000 m2).[2] It is owned and managed by Simon Property Group. It is also the most successful mall in the state.[3] The anchors of the 270-store mall are Bloomingdale's, JCPenney, Macy's, Nordstrom, Dick's Sporting Goods, and Neiman Marcus. Previous anchor stores were Gimbels
Gimbels
(succeeded by Stern's), A&S, and Alexander's (succeeded by Bloomingdale's)
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Garden City, New York
Garden City is an incorporated village in Nassau County, New York, United States, in the town of Hempstead. It was founded by multi-millionaire Alexander Turney Stewart
Alexander Turney Stewart
in 1869, and is on Long Island, to the east of New York City, 18.5 miles (29.8 km) from midtown Manhattan. The village is located mostly in the Town of Hempstead with a small portion in the Town of North Hempstead.[2] As of the 2010 census, Garden City's population was 22,371.[3] The Garden City name is applied to several other unincorporated, nearby jurisdictions, as well. In the region, hamlets such as Garden City South, Garden City Park, and East Garden City are located next to the incorporated village of Garden City, but are not themselves part of it
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Middle-class
The middle class is a class of people in the middle of a social hierarchy. In Weberian socio-economic terms, the middle class is the broad group of people in contemporary society who fall socio-economically between the working class and upper class. The common measures of what constitutes middle class vary significantly among cultures. One of the narrowest definitions limits it to those in the middle fifth of the nation's income ladder
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Parquetry
Parquet (from the French "a small compartment") is a geometric mosaic of wood pieces used for decorative effect in flooring. Parquet patterns are often entirely geometrical and angular—squares, triangles, lozenges—but may contain curves. The most popular parquet flooring pattern is herringbone.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Materials 4 Cleaning 5 Repair 6 Domestic use 7 Basketball courts 8 See also 9 Notes and references 10 External linksEtymology[edit] The word derives from the Old French parchet (the diminutive of parc), literally meaning "a small enclosed space". History[edit]Parquet VersaillesLarge diagonal squares known as parquet de Versailles were introduced in 1684 as parquet de menuiserie ("woodwork parquet") to replace the marble flooring that required constant washing, which tended to rot the joists beneath the floors
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Mass-market
Mass market is a market for goods produced on a large scale for a group of significant number of end consumers. Mass market is the opposite of the term niche market in that the first focuses on consumers with a wide variety of backgrounds with no identifiable preferences and expectations in a large market segment.[1][2] Traditionally, businesses reach out to the mass market with advertising messages through a variety of media including radio, TV, newspapers and the Web.[3] Overview[edit] The mass market is the group of end consumers of common household products who are perceived as "average". This group encompasses such a wide variety of people, their need for, uses for, and price point for market offerings may vary greatly
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Hardcover
A hardcover or hardback (also known as hardbound, and sometimes as case-bound) book is one bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with buckram or other cloth, heavy paper, or occasionally leather). It has a flexible, sewn spine which allows the book to lie flat on a surface when opened. Following the ISBN
ISBN
sequence numbers, books of this type may be identified by the abbreviation Hbk.Detail of "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea", first English edition (1873), showing cloth pattern on cover Hardcover
Hardcover
books are often printed on acid-free paper, and they are much more durable than paperbacks, which have flexible, easily damaged paper covers. Hardcover
Hardcover
books are marginally more costly to manufacture
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Paperback
A paperback is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples. In contrast, hardcover or hardback books are bound with cardboard covered with cloth. The pages on the inside are made of paper. Inexpensive books bound in paper have existed since at least the 19th century in such forms as pamphlets, yellowbacks, dime novels, and airport novels.[1] Modern paperbacks can be differentiated by size. In the U.S., there are "mass-market paperbacks" and larger, more durable "trade paperbacks." In the U.K., there are A-format, B-format, and the largest C-format sizes.[2] Paperback
Paperback
editions of books are issued when a publisher decides to release a book in a low-cost format. Cheaper, lower quality paper; glued (rather than stapled or sewn) bindings; and the lack of a hard cover may contribute to the lower cost of paperbacks
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Reading Rainbow
Educational App Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
App for Kindle Fire on the Amazon Appstore Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
App for iPad on the Apple App Store Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
is an American half-hour educational children's television series that aired on PBS
PBS
Kids from June 6, 1983 to November 10, 2006, with a total of 155 half-hour episodes spanning over 21 seasons. The show encouraged children to read
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GameStop
1984; 34 years ago (1984) (as Babbage's) Dallas, Texas, U.S. 1999; 19 years ago (1999) (as GameStop)Founders James McCurry Gary M
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Chapter 11 Bankruptcy
Chapter 11 is a chapter of Title 11 of the United States
United States
Bankruptcy Code, which permits reorganization under the bankruptcy laws of the United States
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Bloomberg News
Bloomberg News
Bloomberg News
is an international news agency headquartered in New York, United States
United States
and a division of Bloomberg L.P.
Bloomberg L.P.
Content produced by Bloomberg News
Bloomberg News
is disseminated through Bloomberg Terminals, Bloomberg Television, Bloomberg Radio, Bloomberg Businessweek, Bloomberg Markets, Bloomberg.com
Bloomberg.com
and Bloomberg's mobile platforms
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