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Azuchi–Momoyama Period
The Azuchi–Momoyama period
Azuchi–Momoyama period
(安土桃山時代, Azuchi–Momoyama jidai) is the final phase of the Sengoku period
Sengoku period
(戦国時代, Sengoku jidai) in Japan. These years of political unification led to the establishment of the Tokugawa shogunate. It spans the years from c. 1573 to 1600, during which time Oda Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga
and his successor, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, imposed order upon the chaos that had pervaded since the collapse of the Ashikaga shogunate. Although a start date of 1573 is often given, this period in broader terms begins with Nobunaga's entry into Kyoto
Kyoto
in 1568, when he led his army to the imperial capital in order to install Ashikaga Yoshiaki
Ashikaga Yoshiaki
as the 15th – and ultimately final – shōgun of the Ashikaga shogunate
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Oda Clan
The Oda clan
Oda clan
(織田氏, Oda-shi) was a family of Japanese daimyōs who were to become an important political force in the unification of Japan
Japan
in the mid-16th century. Though they had the climax of their fame under Oda Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga
and fell from the spotlight soon after, several branches of the family continued as daimyō houses until the Meiji Restoration.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Independence 1.3 Nobunaga's reign 1.4 Edo period2 Descendants 3 Notable figures 4 Senior retainer families 5 Nobunaga's notable retainers 6 Clan castles 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The Oda family in the time of Nobunaga claimed descent from the Taira clan, by Taira no Chikazane, a grandson of Taira no Shigemori (1138–1179). Taira no Chikazane established himself at Oda (Echizen Province) and took its name
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Kyoto
Kyoto
Kyoto
(京都市, Kyōto-shi, pronounced [kʲoːꜜto] ( listen), pronounced [kʲoːtoꜜɕi] ( listen); UK: /kɪˈoʊtoʊ/, US: /kiˈoʊ-/, or /ˈkjoʊ-/[4]) is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million
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First Sino-Japanese War
Japanese victoryA significant loss of prestige for the Qing Empire Joseon
Joseon
removed from the Qing Empire's vassalage Korean Peninsula
Korean

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Boshin War
1868 Imperial Court Tozama:Satchō Alliance Satsuma Domain Chōshū DomainOther tozama daimyōs: Tosa Domain Hiroshima Domain Tsu Domain Saga Domain Ōgaki Domain Hirosaki Domain Kuroishi Domain Yodo Domain1868 Shogunate Aizu
Aizu
Domain Takamatsu Domain Northern Alliance Jōzai Domain Tsuruoka Domain Kuwana Domain Matsuyama Domain Defected: Tsu Domain Yodo Domain Ōgaki Domain1869  Empire of JapanSupported by:  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland1869 Republic of EzoSupported by:  French EmpireCommanders and lea
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Anno Domini
The terms anno Domini[a][1][2] (AD) and before Christ[b][3][4][5] (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term anno Domini is Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
and means "in the year of the Lord",[6] but is often presented using "our Lord" instead of "the Lord",[7][8] taken from the full original phrase "anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi", which translates to "in the year of our Lord Jesus
Jesus
Christ". This calendar era is based on the traditionally reckoned year of the conception or birth of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, with AD counting years from the start of this epoch, and BC denoting years before the start of the era. There is no year zero in this scheme, so the year AD 1 immediately follows the year 1 BC
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Before Christ
The terms anno Domini[a][1][2] (AD) and before Christ[b][3][4][5] (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term anno Domini is Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
and means "in the year of the Lord",[6] but is often presented using "our Lord" instead of "the Lord",[7][8] taken from the full original phrase "anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi", which translates to "in the year of our Lord Jesus
Jesus
Christ". This calendar era is based on the traditionally reckoned year of the conception or birth of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, with AD counting years from the start of this epoch, and BC denoting years before the start of the era. There is no year zero in this scheme, so the year AD 1 immediately follows the year 1 BC
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Toyotomi Clan
The Toyotomi clan
Toyotomi clan
(豊臣氏, Toyotomi-shi) was a Japanese clan
Japanese clan
that ruled over Japan
Japan
before the Edo period. Unity and conflict[edit] The most influential figure within the Toyotomi was Toyotomi Hideyoshi, one of the three "unifiers of Japan". Oda Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga
was another primary unifier and the ruler of the Oda clan
Oda clan
at the time. Hideyoshi joined Nobunaga at a young age, but was not highly regarded because of his peasant background. Nevertheless, Hideyoshi's increasing influence allowed him to seize a significant degree of power from the Oda clan
Oda clan
following Oda Nobunaga's death in 1582
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Japanese Mon (currency)
The mon (文) was the currency of Japan
Japan
from the Muromachi period
Muromachi period
in 1336, until the early Meiji period
Meiji period
in 1870. It co-circulated with the new sen until 1891. The Kanji
Kanji
for mon is 文 and the character for currency was widely used in the Chinese-character cultural sphere, e.g. Chinese wen, Korean mun. Throughout Japanese history, there were many different styles of currency of many shapes, styles, designs, sizes and materials, including gold, silver, bronze, etc. Coins denominated in mon were cast in copper or iron and circulated alongside silver and gold ingots denominated in shu, bu and ryō, with 4000 mon = 16 shu = 4 bu = 1 ryo. In 1869, due to depreciation against gold, the new fixing officially was set for 1 ryo/yen = equal to 10.000 mon
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Battle Of Sekigahara
The Battle of Sekigahara
Battle of Sekigahara
(Shinjitai: 関ヶ原の戦い; Kyūjitai: 關ヶ原の戰い, Sekigahara no Tatakai) was a decisive battle on October 21, 1600 ( Keichō
Keichō
5, 15th day of the 9th mont
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Late Hōjō Clan
The Later Hōjō clan
Hōjō clan
(後北条氏, Go-Hōjō-shi) was one of the most powerful warrior clans in Japan in the Sengoku period
Sengoku period
and held domains primarily in the Kantō region.Contents1 History 2 Heads 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 References 6 Additional ReadingHistory[edit] The history of the family is written in the Hōjō Godaiki.[1] The clan is traditionally reckoned to be started by Ise Shinkurō, who came from a branch of the prestigious Ise clan, a family in the direct employment of the Ashikaga shōguns. During the succession crisis in the 15th century, Shinkurō became associated with the Imagawa clan via the marriage of his sister to the Imagawa head, who led an army to Kyoto
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Tokugawa Clan
The Tokugawa clan
Tokugawa clan
(徳川氏、德川氏, Tokugawa-shi or Tokugawa-uji) was a powerful daimyō family of Japan. They nominally descended from Emperor Seiwa
Emperor Seiwa
(850–880) and were a branch of the Minamoto clan
Minamoto clan
(Seiwa Genji) by the Nitta clan. The early history of this clan remains a mystery.[1] Members of the clan ruled Japan
Japan
as shōguns from 1603 to 1867.Contents1 History 2 Simplified genealogy, showing complete lines of descent 3 Crest 4 Family members 5 Retainers5.1 Clans 5.2 Important retainers6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Minamoto no Yoshishige (1135–1202), grandson of Minamoto no Yoshiie (1041–1108), was the first to take the name of Nitta
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Toyotomi Clan
The Toyotomi clan
Toyotomi clan
(豊臣氏, Toyotomi-shi) was a Japanese clan
Japanese clan
that ruled over Japan
Japan
before the Edo period. Unity and conflict[edit] The most influential figure within the Toyotomi was Toyotomi Hideyoshi, one of the three "unifiers of Japan". Oda Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga
was another primary unifier and the ruler of the Oda clan
Oda clan
at the time. Hideyoshi joined Nobunaga at a young age, but was not highly regarded because of his peasant background. Nevertheless, Hideyoshi's increasing influence allowed him to seize a significant degree of power from the Oda clan
Oda clan
following Oda Nobunaga's death in 1582
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Battle Of Nagashino
The Battle of Nagashino
Battle of Nagashino
(長篠の戦い, Nagashino no Tatakai) took place in 1575 near Nagashino Castle
Nagashino Castle
on the plain of Shitarabara in the Mikawa Province
Mikawa Province
of Japan. Takeda Katsuyori
Takeda Katsuyori
attacked the castle when Okudaira Sadamasa
Okudaira Sadamasa
rejoined the Tokugawa, and when his original plot with Oga Yashiro for taking Okazaki Castle, the capital of Mikawa, was discovered.[1]:80–82 Takeda Katsuyori
Takeda Katsuyori
attacked the castle on 16 June, using Takeda gold miners to tunnel under the walls, rafts to ferry samurai across the rivers, and siege towers. On 22 June the siege became a blockade, complete with palisades and cables strewn across the river. The defenders then sent Torii Suneemon
Torii Suneemon
to get help
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Russo-Japanese War
1,200,000 (total)[1]650,000 (peak)1,365,000 (total)[1]700,000 (peak)Casualties and losses47,152–47,400 killed 11,424–11,500 died of wounds 21,802–27,200 died of diseaseTotal: 58,000–86,100[2][3]34,000–52,623 killed or died of wounds 9,300–18,830 died of disease 146,032 wounded 74,369 capturedTotal: 43,300–120,000[2][3]v t eRusso-Japanese WarNaval battles1st Port Arthur Chemulpo Bay Hitachi Maru convoy Yellow Sea Ulsan Korsakov TsushimaLand battlesYalu River Nanshan Te-li-Ssu Motien Pass Tashihchiao 2nd Port Arthur Hsimucheng Liaoyang Shaho Sandepu Mukden Sakhalinv t eJapanese colonial campaignsMeiji period Korea
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Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
(豊臣 秀吉, March 17, 1537 – September 18, 1598) was a preeminent daimyō, warrior, general, samurai, and politician of the Sengoku period[1] who is regarded as Japan's second "great unifier".[2] He succeeded his former liege lord, Oda Nobunaga, and brought an end to the Warring Lords period. The period of his rule is often called the Momoyama period, named after Hideyoshi's castle. After his death, his young son Hideyori was displaced by Tokugawa Ieyasu. Hideyoshi is noted for a number of cultural legacies, including the restriction that only members of the samurai class could bear arms. He financed the construction, restoration and rebuilding of many temples standing today in Kyoto. Outside of Japan, he is best known for ordering the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–98)
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