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Autophradates
AUTOPHRADATES (in Greek Aυτoφραδάτης; lived 4th century BC) was a Persian who distinguished himself as a general in the reign of Artaxerxes III and Darius Codomannus . During the reign of the Artaxerxes III , Autophradates
Autophradates
captured Artabazus , the satrap of Lydia
Lydia
and Ionia
Ionia
who had revolted against Persian king, and made him his prisoner, but afterwards set him free and joined the Revolt of the Satraps . After the death of the Persian admiral, Memnon , in 333 BC, Autophradates
Autophradates
and Pharnabazus undertook the command of the fleet, and reduced Mytilene
Mytilene
, the siege of which had been begun by Memnon. Pharnabazus now sailed with his prisoners to Lycia
Lycia
, and Autophradates attacked the other islands in the Aegean sea
Aegean sea
which supported Alexander the Great
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William Smith (lexicographer)
SIR WILLIAM SMITH (20 May 1813 – 7 October 1893) was an English lexicographer . CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 Career * 2.1 Publications * 3 Honours and death * 4 Notes * 5 References * 6 External links EARLY LIFESmith was born in Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. He attended the Madras House school of John Allen in Hackney. Originally destined for a theological career, he instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics , and when he entered University College London
University College London
he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes. He was entered at Gray\'s Inn in 1830, but gave up his legal studies for a post at University College School and began to write on classical subjects. CAREERSmith next turned his attention to lexicography
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Dictionary Of Greek And Roman Biography And Mythology
The DICTIONARY OF GREEK AND ROMAN BIOGRAPHY AND MYTHOLOGY (1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia /biographical dictionary . Edited by William Smith , the dictionary spans three volumes and 3,700 pages. It is a classic work of 19th-century lexicography . The work is a companion to Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography . CONTENTS * 1 Authors and scope * 2 Use and availability today * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links AUTHORS AND SCOPE Excerpt from Philolaus
Philolaus
Pythagoras book, (Charles Peter Mason, 1870) The work lists thirty-five authors in addition to the editor, who is also an author for some definitions and articles
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Mysia
MYSIA (UK /ˈmɪsiə/ , US /ˈmɪʒə/ or /ˈmiːʒə/ ; Greek : Μυσία, Latin : Mysia, Turkish : Misya) was a region in the northwest of ancient Asia Minor ( Anatolia
Anatolia
, Asian part of modern Turkey
Turkey
). It was located on the south coast of the Sea of Marmara
Sea of Marmara
. It was bounded by Bithynia
Bithynia
on the east, Phrygia on the southeast, Lydia on the south, Aeolis
Aeolis
on the southwest, Troad
Troad
on the west and by the Propontis on the north. In ancient times it was inhabited by the Mysians , Phrygians , Aeolian Greeks
Greeks
and other groups
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Atarneus
ATARNEUS (/əˈtɑːrniəs/ ; Greek : Ἀταρνεύς Atarneus) was an ancient Greek city in the region of Aeolis
Aeolis
, Asia Minor
Asia Minor
. It lies on the mainland opposite the island of Lesbos
Lesbos
, northeast of the town of Dikili
Dikili
in modern-day Turkey
Turkey
. Atarneus
Atarneus
flowered in the 4th century BC, when it was the seat of government of Hermias of Atarneus , ruling over the area from Atarneus to Assos
Assos
. The city was deserted by inhabitants in the 1st century AD, possibly following an outbreak of an unknown epidemic. The city is known by many for its association with the life of Aristotle
Aristotle

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Ancient Tenedos
TENEDOS (Greek : Τένεδος Tenedhos) or BOZCAADA (Turkish : Bozcaada) is an island of Turkey
Turkey
in the northeastern part of the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
. Administratively, the island constitutes the Bozcaada district of Çanakkale province . With an area of 39.9 km2 (15 sq mi) it is the third largest Turkish island after Imbros
Imbros
(Gökçeada) and Marmara . In 2011 , the district had a population of 2,472. The main industries are tourism, wine production and fishing. The island has been famous for its grapes, wines and red poppies for centuries
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Boston
BOSTON (/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen ) BOSS-tən ) is the capital city and most populous municipality of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States. The city proper covers 48 square miles (124 km2) with an estimated population of 687,584 in 2017, making it also the most populous city in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States
United States
. Boston
Boston
is the seat of Suffolk County as well, although the county government was disbanded on July 1, 1999. The city is the economic and cultural anchor of a substantially larger metropolitan area known as Greater Boston , a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) home to a census-estimated 4.8 million people in 2016 and ranking as the tenth-largest such area in the country
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Demosthenes
DEMOSTHENES (/dɪˈmɒs.θəniːz/ ; Greek : Δημοσθένης Dēmosthénēs; Attic Greek
Attic Greek
: ; 384 – 12 October 322 BC) was a Greek statesman and orator of ancient Athens
Athens
. His orations constitute a significant expression of contemporary Athenian intellectual prowess and provide an insight into the politics and culture of ancient Greece during the 4th century BC. Demosthenes
Demosthenes
learned rhetoric by studying the speeches of previous great orators. He delivered his first judicial speeches at the age of 20, in which he argued effectively to gain from his guardians what was left of his inheritance. For a time, Demosthenes
Demosthenes
made his living as a professional speech-writer (logographer ) and a lawyer , writing speeches for use in private legal suits
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Public Domain
The legal term PUBLIC DOMAIN refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired, have been forfeited, have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable. For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven , and most of the early silent films , are all now in the public domain by either being created before copyrights existed or by their copyright term expiring. Examples for works not covered by copyright which are therefore in the public domain, are the formulae of Newtonian physics , cooking recipes , and all software before 1974. Examples for works actively dedicated into public domain by their authors are reference implementations of cryptographic algorithms , NIH 's ImageJ , and the CIA
CIA
's World Factbook
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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Politics (Aristotle)
POLITICS (Greek : Πολιτικά) is a work of political philosophy by Aristotle
Aristotle
, a 4th-century BC Greek philosopher
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Aristotle
ARISTOTLE (/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/ ; Greek : Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs, pronounced ; 384–322 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira , Chalkidice , on the northern periphery of Classical Greece
Greece
. Along with Plato, Aristotle
Aristotle
is considered the "Father of Western Philosophy", which from his teachings inherited almost its entire lexicon, including problems and methods of inquiry, so influencing almost any form of knowledge known to the modern world. His father, Nicomachus , died when Aristotle
Aristotle
was a child, whereafter Proxenus of Atarneus became his guardian. At seventeen or eighteen years of age, he joined Plato\'s Academy in Athens
Athens
and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c. 347 BC)
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Anabasis Alexandri
THE ANABASIS OF ALEXANDER (Greek : Ἀλεξάνδρου Ἀνάβασις, Alexándrou Anábasis; Latin : Anabasis Alexandri) was composed by Arrian of Nicomedia in the second century AD , most probably during the reign of Hadrian
Hadrian
. The Anabasis (which survives complete in seven books) is a history of the campaigns of Alexander the Great , specifically his conquest of the Persian Empire between 336 and 323 BC. Both the unusual title "Anabasis" (literally "a journey up-country from the sea") and the work's seven-book structure reflect Arrian's emulation (in structure, style, and content) of the Greek historian Xenophon
Xenophon
, whose own Anabasis in seven books concerned the earlier campaign "up-country" of Cyrus the Younger in 401 BC. The Anabasis is by far the fullest surviving account of Alexander 's conquest of the Persian empire
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Alexander The Great
ALEXANDER III OF MACEDON (20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as ALEXANDER THE GREAT (Greek : Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, Aléxandros ho Mégas Koine Greek: ), was a king (basileus ) of the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty . He was born in Pella in 356 BC and succeeded his father Philip II to the throne at the age of twenty. He spent most of his ruling years on an unprecedented military campaign through Asia and northeast Africa, and he had created one of the largest empires of the ancient world by the age of thirty, stretching from Greece
Greece
to northwestern India
India
. He was undefeated in battle and is widely considered one of history's most successful military commanders
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Aegean Sea
The AEGEAN SEA (/ᵻˈdʒiːən/ ; Greek : Αιγαίο Πέλαγος ( listen ); Turkish : Ege Denizi Turkish pronunciation: ) is an elongated embayment of the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea located between the Greek and Anatolian peninsulas , i.e., between the mainlands of Greece
Greece
and Turkey
Turkey
. In the north, it is connected to the Marmara Sea
Sea
and Black Sea
Sea
by the Dardanelles and Bosphorus . The Aegean Islands are within the sea and some bound it on its southern periphery, including Crete
Crete
and Rhodes
Rhodes

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Satrap
SATRAPS were the governors of the provinces of the ancient Median and Achaemenid Empires and in several of their successors, such as in the Sasanian Empire
Sasanian Empire
and the Hellenistic empires. The word SATRAP is also often used metaphorically in modern literature to refer to world leaders or governors who are heavily influenced by larger world superpowers or hegemonies and act as their surrogates. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 Medo-Persian satraps * 3 Hellenistic satraps * 4 Parthian and Sassanian satraps * 5 Western satraps * 6 Satraps today * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 Further reading * 10 External links ETYMOLOGYThe word satrap is derived via Latin satrapes from Greek satrápēs (σατράπης), itself borrowed from an Old Iranian *xšaθra-pā/ă-
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