HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Automatic Transmission
An automatic transmission, also called auto, self-shifting transmission, n-speed automatic (where n is its number of forward gear ratios), or AT, is a type of motor vehicle transmission that can automatically change gear ratios as the vehicle moves, freeing the driver from having to shift gears manually. Like other transmission systems on vehicles, it allows an internal combustion engine, best suited to run at a relatively high rotational speed, to provide a range of speed and torque outputs necessary for vehicular travel. The number of forward gear ratios is often expressed for manual transmissions as well (e.g., 6-speed manual). The most popular form found in automobiles is the hydraulic automatic transmission. Similar but larger devices are also used for heavy-duty commercial and industrial vehicles and equipment. This system uses a fluid coupling in place of a friction clutch, and accomplishes gear changes by hydraulically locking and unlocking a system of planetary gears
[...More...]

"Automatic Transmission" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Forklift
A forklift (also called lift truck, fork truck, fork hoist, and forklift truck) is a powered industrial truck used to lift and move materials over short distances. The forklift was developed in the early 20th century by various companies, including Clark, which made transmissions, and Yale & Towne Manufacturing, which made hoists.[1][2][3] Since World War II, the use and development of the forklift truck have greatly expanded worldwide
[...More...]

"Forklift" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Boston
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
[...More...]

"Boston" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ferdinand Von Zeppelin
Ferdinand Adolf Heinrich August Graf von Zeppelin[1] (8 July 1838 – 8 March 1917) was a German general and later aircraft manufacturer, who founded the Zeppelin
Zeppelin
airship company.Contents1 Family and personal life 2 Army career 3 Airships 4 Other aircraft 5 Family 6 Legacy 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksFamily and personal life[edit]Isabella Gräfin von ZeppelinFerdinand was the scion of a noble family. Zepelin, the family's eponymous hometown, is a small community outside the town of Bützow in Mecklenburg. Ferdinand was the son of Württemberg
Württemberg
Minister and Hofmarschall Friedrich Jerôme Wilhelm Karl Graf von Zeppelin
Zeppelin
(1807–1886) and his wife Amélie Françoise Pauline (born Macaire d'Hogguer) (1816–1852)
[...More...]

"Ferdinand Von Zeppelin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Internal Combustion Engine
An internal combustion engine (ICE) is a heat engine where the combustion of a fuel occurs with an oxidizer (usually air) in a combustion chamber that is an integral part of the working fluid flow circuit. In an internal combustion engine, the expansion of the high-temperature and high-pressure gases produced by combustion applies direct force to some component of the engine. The force is applied typically to pistons, turbine blades, rotor or a nozzle
[...More...]

"Internal Combustion Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gear Ratio
A gear train is a mechanical system formed by mounting gears on a frame so the teeth of the gears engage. Gear
Gear
teeth are designed to ensure the pitch circles of engaging gears roll on each other without slipping, providing a smooth transmission of rotation from one gear to the next.[1] The transmission of rotation between contacting toothed wheels can be traced back to the Antikythera mechanism
Antikythera mechanism
of Greece and the south-pointing chariot of China
[...More...]

"Gear Ratio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Motor Vehicle
A motor vehicle is a self-propelled vehicle, commonly wheeled, that does not operate on rails, such as trains or trams and used for the transportation of passengers, or passengers and property. The vehicle propulsion is provided by an engine or motor, usually by an internal combustion engine, or an electric motor, or some combination of the two, such as hybrid electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids. For legal purposes motor vehicles are often identified within a number of vehicle classes including cars, buses, motorcycles, off-road vehicles, light trucks and regular trucks. These classifications vary according to the legal codes of each country
[...More...]

"Motor Vehicle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cutaway (industrial)
A cutaway, in the industrial sense, refers to the display of a manufactured product, (an engine, a pump, a regulator, etc. . .) where a portion of the exterior housing has been removed to reveal the internal components, (pistons, bearings, seals, etc.
[...More...]

"Cutaway (industrial)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is an American business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal, along with its Asian and European editions, is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to News Corp, in their June 2017 10-K Filing with the SEC, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.277 million copies (including nearly 1,270,000 digital subscriptions) as of June 2017[update],[2] compared with USA Today's 1.7 million. The newspaper has won 40 Pulitzer Prizes through 2017[3] and derives its name from Wall Street
Wall Street
in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan
[...More...]

"Wall Street Journal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lawn Mower
A lawn mower (mower) is a machine utilizing one or more revolving blades to cut a grass surface to an even height. The height of the cut grass may be fixed by the design of the mower, but generally is adjustable by the operator, typically by a single master lever, or by a lever or nut and bolt on each of the machine's wheels. The blades may be powered by muscle, with wheels mechanically connected to the cutting blades so that when the mower is pushed forward, the blades spin, or the machine may have a battery-powered or plug-in electric motor. The most common power source for lawn mowers is a small (typically one cylinder) internal combustion engine. Smaller mowers often lack any form of propulsion, requiring human power to move over a surface; "walk-behind" mowers are self-propelled, requiring a human only to walk behind and guide them
[...More...]

"Lawn Mower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Horseless Carriage
Horseless carriage
Horseless carriage
is a term for early automobiles; at the time it was common that carriages were pulled by animals, typically horses, but the automobiles were not.[1][2] In 2010, the term was compared to other transitional terms, like cordless phone and wireless phone. These are cases in which a new technology is described by what it does not have, compared to an older technology.[2] Horseless carriages are noted for their similarity to horse-drawn carriages, but instead with some type of motor; some features of carriages include a high center of gravity and tiller-steering.[3] In 1803, what has be
[...More...]

"Horseless Carriage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(/ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɪts/ ( listen), /-zɪts/), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the east, the states of Connecticut
Connecticut
and Rhode Island
Rhode Island
to the south, New Hampshire
New Hampshire
and Vermont
Vermont
to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett
Massachusett
tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area. The capital of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and the most populous city in New England
New England
is Boston
[...More...]

"Massachusetts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"World War I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Metallurgy
Metallurgy
Metallurgy
is a domain of materials science and engineering that studies the physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their inter-metallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys. Metallurgy
Metallurgy
is used to separate metals from their ore . Metallurgy
Metallurgy
is also the technology of metals: the way in which science is applied to the production of metals, and the engineering of metal components for usage in products for consumers and manufacturers. The production of metals involves the processing of ores to extract the metal they contain, and the mixture of metals, sometimes with other elements, to produce alloys. Metallurgy
Metallurgy
is distinguished from the craft of metalworking, although metalworking relies on metallurgy, as medicine relies on medical science, for technical advancement
[...More...]

"Metallurgy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Henry Ford
Henry Ford
Henry Ford
(July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was an American captain of industry and a business magnate, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and the sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production. Although Ford did not invent the automobile or the assembly line,[1] he developed and manufactured the first automobile that many middle-class Americans could afford. In doing so, Ford converted the automobile from an expensive curiosity into a practical conveyance that would profoundly impact the landscape of the 20th century. His introduction of the Model T
Model T
automobile revolutionized transportation and American industry. As the owner of the Ford Motor Company, he became one of the richest and best-known people in the world. He is credited with "Fordism": mass production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers. Ford had a global vision, with consumerism as the key to peace
[...More...]

"Henry Ford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.