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Aussie
Aussie[1] or Ozzie[2] is Australian slang for an Australian and less commonly, Australia.[3][4][5][6][7] Aussie
Aussie
can be used in the form of an adjective,[8] noun,[9][10] or proper noun.Contents1 Pronunciation 2 Ethnic usage 3 Chants 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPronunciation[edit] In Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, United Kingdom, and Ireland, the word is pronounced /ˈɒzi/ OZ-ee, with a /z/;[4] however, in the United States, it is most often pronounced /ˈɔːsi/ AW-see with a /s/.[11][12][13] Pronouncing the word with an /s/ in place of the /z/ is considere
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Down Under
The term Down Under is a colloquialism which is variously construed to refer to Australia
Australia
and New Zealand. The term comes from the fact that these countries are in the Southern Hemisphere, "below" many other countries, especially Western countries, on a globe oriented with the north towards to top.[1][2] The persistence of the media use of the term has led to its wide embrace and usage. The Men at Work
Men at Work
song "Down Under" became a patriotic rallying song for Australians. The Russian-Australian boxing champion Kostya Tszyu
Kostya Tszyu
was nicknamed "The Thunder from Down Under", as is Australian snooker player Neil Robertson
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American English
American English
American English
(AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US),[3] sometimes called United States
United States
English or U.S. English,[4][5] is the set of dialects of the English language
English language
native to the United States
United States
of America.[6] English is the most widely spoken language in the United States
United States
and is the common language used by the federal government, to the extent that all laws and compulsory education are practiced in English
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Anglo-Celtic Australian
Anglo-Celtic Australians[3] are Australians
Australians
whose ancestors originate wholly or partially in the countries of the British Isles
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Collins English Dictionary
A dictionary, sometimes known as a wordbook, is a collection of words in one or more specific languages, often arranged alphabetically (or by radical and stroke for ideographic languages), which may include information on definitions, usage, etymologies, pronunciations, translation, etc.[1] or a book of words in one language with their equivalents in another, sometimes known as a lexicon.[1] It is a lexicographical product which shows inter-relationships among the data.[2] A broad distinction is made between general and specialized dictionaries. Specialized dictionaries include words in specialist fields, rather than a complete range of words in the language. Lexical items that describe concepts in specific fields are usually called terms instead of words, although there is no consensus whether lexicology and terminology are two different fields of study
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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British People
 United Kingdom 57,678,000[2] (British citizens of any race or ethnicity) British Overseas Territories 247,899[3] United States 40,234,652-72,065,000 1 678,000 2[4][5] Canada 12,134,745 1 609,000 4[6] Australia 9,031,100 1[7] 1,300,000 4[8] Hong Kong 3,400,000 3 4[9] New Zealand 2,425,278 1 217,000 4[10] South Africa 1,600,000 750,000 4[8][11] Chile 700,000 1[12] France 400,000 4[13] Ireland 291,000 4[8] Argentina 250,000 1[14] United Arab Emirates 240,000 2[15] Spain 236,669 4[16][17] Peru 150,000 1[18] Germany 115,000 2[19] Pakistan 79,447 4[20] Cyprus 59,000 2[19] Thailand 51,000 2[21]  Switzerland 45,000 2[22] Netherlands 44,000 2[22] Israel 44,000[23] Portugal 41,000 2[22] Sweden 39,989 2 China 36,0
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Canuck
"Canuck" /kəˈnʌk/ is a slang term for a Canadian. The origins of the word are uncertain.[1] The term "Kanuck" is first recorded in 1835 as an Americanism (American term), originally referring to a Dutch Canadian or French Canadian.[1][2] By the 1850s, the spelling with a "C" became predominant.[1] Today, English Canadians
Canadians
and others use "Canuck" as a term for any Canadian.[1][3]Contents1 Origin 2 Usage and examples 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOrigin[edit] Although its etymology is unclear,[1] possible origins include:kanata,[4] "village" (see name of Canada) Canada
Canada
+ -uc (Algonquian noun suffix) Genna, an obscure term for Irish-French-Canadians. Kanaka, derived from the Hawaiian Kanaka.[5]Usage and examples[edit] English Canadians
Canadians
use "Canuck" as an affectionate or merely descriptive term for their nationality
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Kiwi (people)
Kiwi
Kiwi
is the nickname used internationally for people from New Zealand,[1][2] as well as being a relatively common self-reference.[3] Unlike many demographic labels, its usage is not considered offensive; rather, it is generally viewed as a symbol of pride and endearment for the people of New Zealand.[4] The name derives from the kiwi, a native flightless bird, which is a national symbol of New Zealand
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Yankee
The term "Yankee" and its contracted form "Yank" have several interrelated meanings, all referring to people from the United States. Its various senses depend on the context
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Australian English Vocabulary
Australian English
Australian English
is a major variety of the English language
English language
spoken throughout Australia. Most of the vocabulary of Australian English
Australian English
is shared with British English, though there are notable differences.[1] The vocabulary of Australia
Australia
is drawn from many sources, including various dialects of British English
British English
as well as Gaelic languages, some Indigenous Australian languages, and Polynesian languages.[2] One of the first dictionaries of Australian slang was Karl Lentzner's Dictionary of the Slang-English of Australia
Australia
and of Some Mixed Languages in 1892.[non-primary source needed] The first dictionary based on historical principles that covered Australian English
Australian English
was E. E
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Australians
Australians
Australians
(/əˈstreɪliən/), colloquially known as Aussies (/ˈɒzi/), are people associated with Australia, sharing a common history, culture, and language (Australian English). Present-day Australians
Australians
are citizens of the Commonwealth of Australia, governed by its nationality law. The majority of Australians
Australians
descend from the peoples of the British Isles. The Colony of New South Wales
Colony of New South Wales
was established by the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1788, with the arrival of the First Fleet, and five other colonies were established in the early 19th century, now forming the six present-day Australian states
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Australian Dollar
$5, $10, $20, $50 $100Coins 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, $1, $2DemographicsOfficial user(s) Australia7 Australian territories Ashmore and Cartier Islands Australian Antarctic Territory  Christmas Island  Cocos (Keeling) Islands Coral Sea Islands Heard Island and McDonald Islands  Norfolk Island7 countries  Kiribati
Kiribati
(alongside Kiribati
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C'mon Aussie C'mon
"C'mon Aussie
Aussie
C'mon" is an Australian Cricket anthem.Contents1 Origination 2 Shannon Noll
Shannon Noll
version2.1 Track listing3 Charts 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrigination[edit] The work was written as a 60-second jingle by Allan Johnston, Alan Morris and other creative staff at the Sydney advertising agency Mojo in 1978 to promote the second season of Kerry Packer's rebel cricket competition World Series Cricket
World Series Cricket
for the Nine television network.[1] The song eulogised players such as Dennis Lillee, the Chappell brothers Ian and Greg and Rod Marsh, used the limerick metre in its verse structure and ended with the refrain, "C'mon Aussie, c'mon, c'mon" sung again and again
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Aussie (other)
Aussie
Aussie
may refer to:Aussie, Australian Aussie
Aussie
(Financial Group), formally
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