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Augustine Henry
Augustine Henry
Augustine Henry
(2 July 1857 – 23 March 1930) was an Irish plantsman and sinologist. He is best known for sending over 15,000 dry specimens and seeds and 500 plant samples to Kew Gardens
Kew Gardens
in the United Kingdom. By 1930, he was a recognised authority and was honoured with society membership in Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Finland, France, and Poland. In 1929 the Botanical Institute of Peking dedicated to him the second volume of Icones plantarum Sinicarum, a collection of plant drawings. In 1935, J. W
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Roger Casement
Roger David Casement (1 September 1864 – 3 August 1916), formerly known as Sir Roger Casement
Roger Casement
CMG,[1] was an Irish nationalist who worked for the British Foreign Office
British Foreign Office
as a diplomat and later became a humanitarian activist, poet and Easter Rising
Easter Rising
leader.[2] Described as the "father of twentieth-century human rights investigations",[3] he was honoured in 1905 for the Casement Report
Casement Report
on the Congo and knighted in 1911 for his important investigations of human rights abuses in Peru. He then made efforts during World War I
World War I
to gain German military aid for the 1916 Easter Rising
Easter Rising
that sought to gain Irish independence.[4] In Africa as a young man, Casement first worked for commercial interests before joining the British Colonial Service
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Kew
Kew
Kew
(/kjuː/) is a suburban[2] district in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north-east of Richmond[3] and 7.1 miles (11.4 km) west by south-west of Charing Cross; its population at the 2011 Census was 11,436.[1] Kew
Kew
is the location of the Royal Botanic Gardens (" Kew
Kew
Gardens"), now a World Heritage Site, which includes Kew
Kew
Palace. Kew
Kew
is also the home of important historical documents such as Domesday Book, which is held at The National Archives. Successive Tudor, Stuart and Georgian monarchs maintained links with Kew
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Formosa
Taiwan, formerly known as Formosa,[b] is an island in East Asia; located some 180 kilometres (112 miles) off the southeastern coast of mainland China
China
across the Taiwan
Taiwan
Strait. It has an area of 35,883 km2 (13,855 sq mi) and spans the Tropic of Cancer. The East China
China
Sea lies to the north, the Philippine Sea
Philippine Sea
to the east, the Luzon Strait
Luzon Strait
directly to the south and the South China Sea to the southwest
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Middle Temple
The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court
Inns of Court
exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn
Gray's Inn
and Lincoln's Inn. It is located in the wider Temple area of London, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.Contents1 History 2 Buildings2.1 The Hall 2.2 Library 2.3 Gatehouse 2.4 Chambers2.4.1 West of Middle Temple
Middle Temple
Lane 2.4.2 East of the lane3 Structure and governance3.1 Liberty 3.2 Badge and coat of arms4 Notable members4.1 Royal benchers5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]Part of Middle Temple, c. 1830, as drawn by Thomas Shepherd
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Mandarin (bureaucrat)
A mandarin (Chinese: 官 guān) was a bureaucrat scholar in the government of imperial China and Vietnam. The term is generally applied to the officials appointed through the imperial examination system; it sometimes includes and sometimes excludes the eunuchs also involved in the governance of the two realms.Contents1 History and use of the term 2 History 3 Ranks under the Qing dynasty 4 Figurative meaning 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory and use of the term[edit] The English term comes from the Portuguese mandarim (spelled in Old Portuguese as mandarin pronounced [ˌmɐ̃n.ðaˈɾĩn]). The Portuguese word is amply attested already in one of the earliest Portuguese reports about China: letters from the imprisoned survivors of the Tomé Pires' embassy, which were most likely written in 1524,[1] and in Castanheda's História do descobrimento e conquista da Índia pelos portugueses (c
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Royal Asiatic Society
The Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, commonly known as the Royal Asiatic Society (RAS), was established, according to its Royal Charter
Royal Charter
of 11 August 1824, to further "the investigation of subjects connected with and for the encouragement of science, literature and the arts in relation to Asia." From its incorporation the Society has been a forum, through lectures, its journal, and other publications, for scholarship relating to Asian culture and society of the highest level. It is the United Kingdom's senior learned society in the field of Asian studies. Fellows of the Society are elected regularly
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Flora
Flora
Flora
is the plant life occurring in a particular region or time, generally the naturally occurring or indigenous—native plant life. The corresponding term for animal life is fauna. Flora, fauna and other forms of life such as fungi are collectively referred to as biota. Sometimes bacteria and fungi are also referred to as flora, as in the terms gut flora or skin flora.[1][2][3]Contents1 Etymology 2 Flora
Flora
classifications 3 Documentation of floras 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word "flora" comes from the Latin
Latin
name of Flora, the goddess of plants, flowers, and fertility in Roman mythology.[4][citation needed] The distinction between vegetation (the general appearance of a community) and flora (the taxonomic composition of a community) was first made by Jules Thurmann
Jules Thurmann
(1849)
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Fauna
Fauna
Fauna
is all of the animal life of any particular region or time. The corresponding term for plants is flora. Flora, fauna and other forms of life such as fungi are collectively referred to as biota. Zoologists and paleontologists use fauna to refer to a typical collection of animals found in a specific time or place, e.g. the " Sonoran Desert
Sonoran Desert
fauna" or the " Burgess Shale
Burgess Shale
fauna". Paleontologists sometimes refer to a sequence of faunal stages, which is a series of rocks all containing similar fossils
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Genus
A genus (/ˈdʒiːnəs/, pl. genera /ˈdʒɛnərə/) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses,[1] in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.E.g. Panthera leo
Panthera leo
(lion) and Panthera onca
Panthera onca
(jaguar) are two species within the genus Panthera. Panthera
Panthera
is a genus within the family Felidae. The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist. The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, so different authorities often produce different classifications for genera
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Armand David
Father Armand David
Armand David
(7 September 1826, Espelette – 10 November 1900, Paris[1]), also known in common names by the French Père David, was a Lazarist
Lazarist
missionary Catholic
Catholic
priest as well as a zoologist and a botanist.Contents1 Biography 2 See also2.1 Catholic
Catholic
missionaries in China 2.2 Protestant missionaries in China 2.3 Eponymous taxa3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit]Multilingual plate at his birthplace from the World Wildlife Fund.Born in Ezpeleta
Ezpeleta
near Bayonne, in the north of Basque Country, in Pyrénées-Atlantiques
Pyrénées-Atlantiques
département of France, he entered the Congregation of the Mission
Congregation of the Mission
in 1848, having already displayed great fondness for the natural sciences
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Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
Kew
(brand name Kew) is a non-departmental public body in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
sponsored by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. An internationally important botanical research and education institution, it employs 723 staff (FTE).[1] Its board of trustees is chaired by Marcus Agius,[1] a former chairman of Barclays. The organisation manages botanic gardens at Kew
Kew
in Richmond upon Thames in southwest London, and at Wakehurst Place, a National Trust property in Sussex
Sussex
which is home to an internationally important Millennium Seed Bank, whose scientists work with partner organisations in more than 95 countries.[3] Seed stored at the bank fulfils two functions: it provides an ex-situ conservation resource and also facilitates research around the globe by acting as a repository for seed scientists
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Nancy, France
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Part of the series onLorraineFlag of Lorraine
Lorraine
since the 13th centuryHistory
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Simao District
Simao District
Simao District
(Chinese: 思茅区; pinyin: Sīmáo Qū; formerly known as Cuiyun District) is a district under the jurisdiction of Pu'er Prefecture, Yunnan
Yunnan
Province, China. It is the seat of Puer Prefecture. Formerly both Simao and the surrounding region of Pu'er prefecture played a major role in the historic tea horse trade between Yunnan, Tibet and India, with Simao acting as the southern terminus or starting point for the transport of tea by mule caravan north to Dali, Lijiang
Lijiang
and Lhasa. Tea remains a central crop and product of the region.[4] In 2007, the city of Simao (思茅市) changed its name to Puer city (普洱市)
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Cambridge University
The University of Cambridge
Cambridge
(informally Cambridge
Cambridge
University)[note 1] is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge
Cambridge
is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[8] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
after a dispute with the townspeople.[9] The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge"
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Avondale, County Wicklow
Avondale Forest
Avondale Forest
is a wooded estate in County Wicklow, Ireland, on the west bank of the River Avonmore. It contains the home of Charles Stewart Parnell which was built in 1777 by Samuel Hayes and is now the Parnell Museum. The park is rich in wildlife and notable features include the exotic tree trail and a well-developed arboretum.Contents1 Habitats and ecology 2 Avondale Forest
Avondale Forest
Park2.1 Forest Trails3 Avondale House 4 External linksHabitats and ecology[edit] Avondale is reflective of the wider practices and history of Irish forests. Little native woodland remains, foreign species are planted for their high return and little thought was given to restoring Ireland's native woodlands. Avondale Forest
Avondale Forest
Park[edit] The forest park lies mainly on the west bank of the Avonmore River covering 214 hectares of land
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