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Auburn, Maine
Auburn is a city in and the county seat of Androscoggin County, Maine, United States.[4] The population was 23,055 at the 2010 census. Auburn and Lewiston (directly across the Androscoggin River
Androscoggin River
from each other) are known locally as the Twin Cities or Lewiston–Auburn
Lewiston–Auburn
(L–A).Contents1 History1.1 Lewiston-Auburn Shoe Strike2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Government 5 Education 6 Media6.1 Newspapers7 Transportation7.1 Roads 7.2 By air 7.3 Rail8 Sites of interest 9 National Register of Historic Places 10 Notable people 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] The area was originally part of the Pejepscot Purchase, land bought in 1714 by an association of people from Boston and Portsmouth following the Treaty of Portsmouth, which brought peace between the Abenaki Indians and the settlers of present-day Maine
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City
A city is a large human settlement.[4][5] Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process. Historically, city-dwellers have been a small proportion of humanity overall, but following two centuries of unprecedented and rapid urbanization, roughly half of the world population now lives in cities, which has had profound consequences for global sustainability.[6] Present-day cities usually form the core of larger metropolitan areas and urban areas—creating numerous commuters traveling towards city centers for employment, entertainment, and edification
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Battle Of Quebec (1690)
 England Massachusetts Bay Colony France Colony of CanadaCommanders and leaders Sir William Phips Louis de Buade de FrontenacStrength2,300 provincial soldiers 60 natives 6 field guns 34 warships Marines, 2,000 militiaCasualties and lossesAt least 150 killed, large number wounded, 1,000 dead on return voyage 7 killed ~12 wounded[1]v t eNine Years' War: North AmericaHudson BayHudson Bay (1686) 1st Fort Albany 2nd Fort Albany York Factory Hudson Bay (1697)Quebec and New YorkLachine Schenectady Quebec La Prairie Mohawk ValleyNew England, Acadia and NewfoundlandDover 1st Pemaquid Salmon Falls Port Royal Falmouth Chedabucto 1st St. John York Wells Placentia Oyster River Groton 2nd St. John 2nd Pemaquid Chignecto Fort Nashwaak Newfoundland HaverhillThe Battle of Quebec was fought in October 1690 between the colonies of New France and Massachusetts Bay, then ruled by the kingdoms of France and England, respectively
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Boston, Massachusetts
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Treaty Of Portsmouth (1713)
Portsmouth (/ˈpɔːrtsməθ/ ( listen)) is a port city in Hampshire, England, mainly on Portsea Island, 70 miles (110 km) south-west of London and 19 miles (31 km) south-east of Southampton. It has a total population of 205,400. The city forms part of the South Hampshire built-up area, which also covers Southampton and the towns of Havant, Waterlooville, Eastleigh, Fareham, and Gosport. The city's history can be traced to Roman times. A significant naval port for centuries, Portsmouth has the world's oldest dry dock and was England's first line of defence during the French invasion in 1545. Special Palmerston Forts were built in 1859 in anticipation of another invasion from continental Europe. By the early-19th century, Portsmouth was the most heavily fortified city in the world, and was considered "the world's greatest naval port" at the height of the British Empire throughout Pax Britannica
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Abenaki
The Abenaki
Abenaki
(Abnaki, Abinaki, Alnôbak) are a Native American tribe and First Nation. They are one of the Algonquian-speaking peoples of northeastern North America. The Abenaki
Abenaki
live in Quebec
Quebec
and the Maritimes of Canada
Canada
and in the New England
New England
region of the United States, a region called Wabanahkik ("Dawn Land") in the Eastern Algonquian languages. The Abenaki
Abenaki
are one of the five members of the Wabanaki Confederacy. "Abenaki" is a linguistic and geographic grouping; historically there was not a strong central authority
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas
Americas
and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas.[24] Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering
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Massachusetts General Court
The Massachusetts General Court (formally styled the General Court of Massachusetts)[3] is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The name "General Court" is a hold-over from the earliest days of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, when the colonial assembly, in addition to making laws, sat as a judicial court of appeals. Before the adoption of the state constitution in 1780, it was called the Great and General Court, but the official title was shortened by John Adams, author of the state constitution. It is a bicameral body. The upper house is the Massachusetts Senate which is composed of 40 members. The lower body, the Massachusetts House of Representatives, has 160 members. (Until 1978, it had 240 members.[4] It meets in the Massachusetts State House on Beacon Hill in Boston. The current President of the Senate is Harriette L. Chandler, and the Speaker of the House is Robert DeLeo
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French And Indian Wars
The French and Indian Wars
French and Indian Wars
is a name used in the United States
United States
for a series of conflicts that occurred in North America
North America
between 1688 and 1763 and were related to the European dynastic wars. The title French and Indian War in the singular is used in the United States specifically for the warfare of 1754–63, the North American colonial counterpart to the Seven Years' War
Seven Years' War
in Europe. The French and Indian Wars were preceded by the Beaver Wars. In Quebec, Canada, a former French colony, the wars are generally referred to as the War of the Conquest
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County Seat
A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in the United States, Canada, Romania, Mainland China
Mainland China
and Taiwan. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.Contents1 Function 2 U.S. counties with more than one county seat 3 Other variations3.1 New England 3.2 Virginia 3.3 South Dakota 3.4 Louisiana 3.5 Alaska 3.6 Canada
Canada
and Vermont4 Lists of U.S. county seats by state 5 Lists of Taiwan
Taiwan
county seats by county 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFunction[edit] In most of the United States, counties are the political subdivisions of a state. The city, town, or populated place that houses county government is known as the seat of its respective county
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The Deserted Village
The Deserted Village
The Deserted Village
is a poem by Oliver Goldsmith
Oliver Goldsmith
published in 1770. It is a work of social commentary, and condemns rural depopulation and the pursuit of excessive wealth. The location of the poem's deserted village is unknown, but the description may have been influenced by Goldsmith's memory of his childhood in rural Ireland, and his travels around England. The poem is written in heroic couplets, and describes the decline of a village and the emigration of many of its residents to America. In the poem, Goldsmith criticises rural depopulation, the moral corruption found in towns, consumerism, enclosure, landscape gardening, avarice, and the pursuit of wealth from international trade. The poem employs, in the words of one critic, "deliberately precise obscurity", and does not reveal the reason why the village has been deserted
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Oliver Goldsmith
Oliver Goldsmith (10 November 1728 – 4 April 1774) was an Irish novelist, playwright and poet, who is best known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), his pastoral poem The Deserted Village (1770), and his plays The Good-Natur'd Man (1768) and She Stoops to Conquer (1771, first performed in 1773). He is thought to have written the classic children's tale The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes (1765).Contents1 Biography 2 Works2.1 The Citizen of the World 2.2 The Hermit 2.3 The Deserted Village 2.4 Other works3 Religious beliefs 4 Memorials concerning Oliver Goldsmith 5 In popular culture 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Council-manager Government
The council–manager government form is one of two predominant forms of local government in the United States and Ireland, the other being the mayor–council government form.[1] Council–manager government form also is used in county governments in the United States
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French Canadian
French Canadians
Canadians
(also referred to as Franco- Canadians
Canadians
or Canadiens; French: Canadien(ne)s français(es)) are an ethnic group who trace their ancestry to French colonists who settled in Canada
Canada
from the 17th century onward. Today, French Canadians
Canadians
constitute the main French-speaking population in Canada, accounting for about 22% of the total population.[2] During the mid-18th century, Canadian colonists born in French Canada expanded across North America
North America
and colonized various regions, cities, and towns;[3] the French Canadian settlers originated primarily from districts in the west of France, such as Normandy, Perche, Beauce, Maine, Anjou, Touraine, Poitou, Aunis, Angoumois, Saintonge
Saintonge
and Gascony.[4] Today, French Canadians
Canadians
live across North America
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Quebec
Quebec
Quebec
(/k(w)ɪˈbɛk/ ( listen);[8] French: Québec [kebɛk] ( listen))[9] is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. It is bordered to the west by the province of Ontario
Ontario
and the bodies of water James Bay
James Bay
and Hudson Bay; to the north by Hudson Strait
Hudson Strait
and Ungava Bay; to the east by the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; and to the south by the province of New Brunswick
New Brunswick
and the U.S. states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York. It also shares maritime borders with Nunavut, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia. Quebec
Quebec
is Canada's largest province by area and its second-largest administrative division; only the territory of Nunavut
Nunavut
is larger
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