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Atlantic City
Atlantic City is a resort city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States, known for its casinos, boardwalks, and beaches. In 2010, it had a population of 39,558.[10][11][12][21][22] The city was incorporated on May 1, 1854, from portions of Egg Harbor Township
Egg Harbor Township
and Galloway Township.[23] It borders Absecon, Brigantine, Pleasantville, Ventnor City, West Atlantic City, and the Atlantic Ocean. Atlantic City inspired the U.S. version of the board game Monopoly, especially the street names. Since 1921, Atlantic City has been the home of the Miss America
Miss America
pageant. In 1976, New Jersey
New Jersey
voters legalized casino gambling in Atlantic City
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2010 United States Census
The 2010 United States
United States
Census (commonly referred to as the 2010 Census) is the twenty-third and most recent United States
United States
national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010.[1] The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired.[2][3] The population of the United States
United States
was counted as 308,745,538,[4] a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census.Contents1 Introduction 2 Major changes 3 Cost 4 Technology 5 Marketing and undercounts 6 Reapportionment 7 Controversies7.1 Clemons v
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ZIP Code
ZIP Codes are a system of postal codes used by the United States Postal Service (USPS) since 1963. The term ZIP is an acronym for Zone Improvement Plan;[1] it was chosen to suggest that the mail travels more efficiently and quickly (zipping along) when senders use the code in the postal address. The basic format consists of five digits. An extended 'ZIP+4' code was introduced in 1983 which includes the five digits of the ZIP Code, followed by a hyphen and four additional digits that determine a more specific location. The term ZIP Code
ZIP Code
was originally registered as a servicemark by the U.S
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(DST), also daylight savings time or daylight time (United States) and summer time (United Kingdom, European Union, and others), is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn.[1] In effect, DST causes a lost hour of sleep in the spring and an extra hour of sleep in the fall.[2][3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation starting on April 30, 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the 1970s energy crisis
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UTC−5
UTC−05:00 is a time offset that subtracts five hours from Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
during standard time, and in the Central Time Zone during the other eight months (see Daylight saving time)
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Eastern Time Zone
The Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
(ET) is a time zone encompassing 17 U.S. states in the eastern part of the contiguous United States, parts of eastern Canada, the state of Quintana Roo
Quintana Roo
in Mexico, Panama
Panama
in Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. Places that use Eastern Standard Time (EST) when observing standard time (autumn/winter) are 5 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−05:00). Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), when observing daylight saving time DST (spring/summer) is 4 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−04:00). In the northern parts of the time zone, on the second Sunday in March, at 2:00 a.m. EST, clocks are advanced to 3:00 a.m. EDT leaving a one-hour "gap". On the first Sunday in November, at 2:00 a.m. EDT, clocks are moved back to 1:00 a.m. EST, thus "duplicating" one hour
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Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours (UTC−12:00 to UTC+14:00), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland
Newfoundland
Standard Time
Time
is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
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Metropolitan Area
A metropolitan area is a region consisting of a densely populated urban core and its less-populated surrounding territories, sharing industry, infrastructure, and housing.[1] A metro area usually comprises multiple jurisdictions and municipalities: neighborhoods, townships, boroughs, cities, towns, exurbs, suburbs, counties, districts, states, and even nations like the eurodistricts. As social, economic and political institutions have changed, metropolitan areas have become key economic and political regions.[2] Metropolitan areas include satellite cities, towns and intervening rural areas that are socioeconomically tied to the urban core, typically measured by commuting patterns.[3] Most metropolitan areas are anchored by one major city such as Paris
Paris
metropolitan area (Paris) and New York metropolitan area
New York metropolitan area
(New York City)
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Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans, with an area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface
Earth's surface
and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Europe
Europe
and Africa
Africa
to the east, and the Americas to the west
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Municipal Clerk
A clerk is a senior official of many municipal governments in the English-speaking world. In some communities, including most in the United States, the position is elected, but in many others, the clerk is appointed to their post. In almost all cases, the actual title of the clerk reflects the type of municipality he or she works for, thus, instead of simply being known as the clerk, the position is generally referred to as the town clerk, township clerk, city clerk, village clerk, borough clerk, board secretary, or county clerk. Other titles also exist. The office has existed for centuries, though in some places it is now being merged with other positions. The duties of a municipal clerk vary even more than their titles. Particularly in the United States, it is difficult to fully describe a clerk's duties, because there are hundreds of different jobs a clerk may fulfill. In some U.S
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City Manager
A city manager is an official appointed as the administrative manager of a city, in a council–manager form of city government. Local officials serving in this position are sometimes referred to as the chief executive officer (CEO) or chief administrative officer (CAO) in some municipalities.[1]Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Responsibilities 4 Profile 5 See also 6 Notes 7 Further reading 8 External linksDescription[edit] Dayton, Ohio
Dayton, Ohio
suffered a great flood in 1913, and responded with the innovation of a paid, non-political city manager, hired by the commissioners to run the bureaucracy; civil engineers were especially preferred
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Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum
The Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum
Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum
(in Spanish, the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza (pronounced [muˈse.o ˈtisem boɾneˈmisa]),[2] named after its founder), or simply the Thyssen, is an art museum in Madrid, Spain, located near the Prado Museum on one of city's main boulevards. It is known as part of the "Golden Triangle of Art", which also includes the Prado and the Reina Sofia national galleries
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UTC−4
UTC−04:00 is a time offset that subtracts 4 hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). It is observed in the Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
(e.g., Canada
Canada
and the United States) during the warm months of daylight saving time, as Eastern Daylight Time. The Atlantic Time Zone
Atlantic Time Zone
observes it during standard time (cold months)
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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City (New Jersey)
A City
City
in the context of New Jersey
New Jersey
local government refers to one of five types and one of eleven forms of municipal government. Despite the widely held perception of a city as a large, urban area, cities in New Jersey
New Jersey
have a confused history as a form of government and vary in size from large, densely populated areas to much smaller hamlets. History[edit] The 1897 and 1899 city charter laws applied only to areas with a population under 12,000, and provided for a directly elected mayor, who served a two-year term and had strong executive powers. Both featured a council elected from wards to staggered three-year terms, plus one councilman elected at-large for a term of two years. The Mayor had veto power, which could be overridden by a two-thirds vote of the Council
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Municipal Corporation
A municipal corporation is the legal term for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, towns, townships, charter townships, villages, and boroughs. The term can also be used to describe municipally owned corporations.[1][2][3]Contents1 Municipal corporation
Municipal corporation
as local self-government1.1 Canada 1.2 India 1.3 Ireland 1.4 United States2 Municipal corporation
Municipal corporation
as enterprises 3 See also 4 References Municipal corporation
Municipal corporation
as local self-government[edit] Municipal incorporation occurs when such municipalities become self-governing entities under the laws of the state or province in which they are located. Often, this event is marked by the award or declaration of a municipal charter
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