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Ashbourne Line
The Ashbourne line
Ashbourne line
was a 33 1⁄2 mi (53.9 km)[1] railway from Buxton
Buxton
via Ashbourne to Uttoxeter. It was built by the London and North Western Railway
London and North Western Railway
using a section of the Cromford
Cromford
and High Peak Railway
Railway
(C&HPR) and it joined the North Staffordshire Railway
Railway
at Ashbourne, proceeding to Uttoxeter
Uttoxeter
with a junction onto the main line at Rocester.Contents1 Origins 2 Construction 3 History 4 The route today 5 References 6 External links 7 BibliographyOrigins[edit] Although the country between Buxton
Buxton
and Ashbourne was sparsely populated, and the terrain immensely difficult, there were a number of motivations for its construction
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Peak National Park
The Peak District is an upland area in England at the southern end of the Pennines. It is mostly in northern Derbyshire, but also includes parts of Cheshire, Greater Manchester, Staffordshire, West Yorkshire and South Yorkshire
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Hartington, Derbyshire
Hartington is a village in the Derbyshire Peak District, England, lying on the River Dove close to the Staffordshire border. According to the 2001 census, the parish of Hartington Town Quarter, which also includes Pilsbury, had a population of 345 reducing to 332 at the 2011 Census.[1] Formerly known for cheese-making and the mining of ironstone, limestone and lead, the village is now popular with tourists.Contents1 Architecture 2 Attractions 3 History 4 Cheese 5 Notable residents 6 References 7 External linksArchitecture[edit] Notable buildings in the village include: the market hall (formerly the site of a market); the 13th-century parish church of Saint Giles; and 17th-century Hartington Hall. The prominent Bank House in the centre of the village was built by the former village mill owner, and in the past was used as the village bank. A half-mile (800 m) to the south of the village, on the Dove, is the fishing house of the famous angler Charles Cotton
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Uttoxeter
Uttoxeter
Uttoxeter
(/juːˈtɒksɪtər/ ( listen) yoo-TOK-sə-tər, sometimes locally /ˈʌtʃɪtər/ UTCH-ə-tər) is a market town in Staffordshire, England, close to the border with Derbyshire, one mile (1.61 km) west of the River Dove. The population was 13,089 at the 2011 Census.[1]Contents1 History 2 Economy2.1 Recent Development3 Location grid 4 Demography 5 Transport and infrastructure5.1 Public services6 Places of interest 7 Media7.1 Television 7.2 Radio 7.3 Newspapers8 Culture8.1 Television appearances9 Religion9.1 St. Mary the Virgin Church 9.2 St
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Rocester
Rocester /ˈroʊstər/ ( listen) is a village and civil parish in the East Staffordshire district of Staffordshire, England. Its name is spelt Rowcestre in the Domesday Book. It is located on the Derbyshire border.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Modern times 4 References 5 External linksGeography[edit] The village is about 4 miles (6.4 km) north of Uttoxeter, and close to the county border with Derbyshire. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 1,431. The village lies on a triangle of land between the River Churnet and River Dove, which join to the south. The parish borders, from the south going clockwise, the parishes of Uttoxeter Rural, Croxden, Denstone, Ellastone, all in East Staffordshire, and then Norbury and Roston, Marston Montgomery and Doveridge, all in the Derbyshire Dales district of Derbyshire. History[edit] A Roman fort was founded on the site in about 69 AD, as an intermediate point between Derby and Newcastle-under-Lyme
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Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
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Manchester
Coordinates: 53°28′46″N 2°14′43″W / 53.47944°N 2.24528°W / 53.47944; -2.24528Manchester City
City
and Metropolitan boroughClockwise from top: Skyline of Manchester
Manchester

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Derby Railway Station
Derby
Derby
railway station /ˈdɑːrbi/ ( listen), also known as Derby
Derby
Midland Station, is a main line station serving the city of Derby
Derby
in England
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Cromford
Cromford is a village and civil parish, two miles to the south of Matlock in the Derbyshire Dales district in Derbyshire, England. The population at the 2011 Census was 1,433.[1] It is principally known for its historical connection with Richard Arkwright, and the nearby Cromford Mill which he built outside the village in 1771. Cromford is in the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage site.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Cultural references 4 Governance 5 Landmarks 6 Notable residents 7 Gallery 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksGeography[edit] The River Derwent, with its sources on Bleaklow in the Dark Peak, flows southward to Derby and then to the River Trent. The geology of this section in the Derbyshire Dales is that of limestone. The fast flowing river has cut a deep valley
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Churnet Valley Line
The Churnet Valley line was one of the three original routes planned and built by the North Staffordshire Railway. Authorised in 1846, the line opened in 1849 and ran from North Rode in Cheshire to Uttoxeter in East Staffordshire. The line was closed in several stages between 1964 and 1988 but part of the central section passed into the hands of a preservation society and today operates as the Churnet Valley Railway.Contents1 Origins 2 Construction 3 Operation 4 London Midland Scottish years4.1 Wartime services5 British Railways 6 Preservation 7 Notes 8 ReferencesOrigins[edit] Various proposals were put forward for a line through the Churnet Valley in the 1830s and in 1841 plans were published by the Manchester & Derby Railway (Churnet Valley) Company for a line from Macclesfield to Derby via Leek, Cheadle, Rocester and Uttoxeter
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Longnor, Staffordshire
Longnor is a village in the Staffordshire Peak District, England. The settlement dates from early times, the first recorded church building being in the Middle Ages. The village was named Longenalre in the Domesday Book. Located on a major crossroads, Longnor was a significant market town in the 18th century. It lies on the north bank of the River Manifold, on a limestone ridge between the Manifold and the River Dove.[2]Contents1 Location and geography 2 Village description 3 History3.1 Methodist history4 Points of general interest 5 ReferencesLocation and geography[edit] Longnor is situated on the B5053 main road from Cheadle to Buxton, about 6 miles (10 km) south of Buxton. It is at a cross roads with routes to Leek and Macclesfield to the west, and Bakewell to the east. West of Longnor are the Staffordshire Moorlands, with a summit at Axe Edge Moor towards the north, and Morridge further south
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Monyash
Monyash (/muhn-ee-ash/ munyash) is a village and civil parish in the Peak District in Derbyshire, England, about 5 miles (8.0 km) west of the market town Bakewell. It is centered on a village green about 265 metres (869 ft) above sea level at the head of Lathkill Dale in the limestone area known as the White Peak.[1][2] In the 2011 census the civil parish had a population of 314.[3] Tourism and farming (milk, beef and lamb) are the predominant activities of the village. In its history the area has been an important meeting place (about 2000 BC), a watering point for drovers’ animals at the intersection of several trade routes, and, for over 700 years, a busy industrial centre supporting the local lead mining industry.[4]Contents1 History 2 Buildings and structures 3 Festivals 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] People have been living in and around Monyash since Neolithic times (3750–1750 BC) and probably before then
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Alsop En Le Dale
Alsop en le Dale is a village in Derbyshire, England about 5 miles (8.0 km) north of Ashbourne close to the Staffordshire border, and a mile from Dovedale, a popular tourist location. Comprising a few cottages and scattered farms, the village was mentioned in the Domesday Book under Derbyshire in the lands belonging to the king.[1] The book which was written in 1086 said:In Parwich are two carucates of land to the geld. There is land for two ploughs. It is waste. Kolli holds it of the king and he has three villans with two bordars with three ploughs. There are twelve acres of meadow. To this manor belong berewicks of Alsop-en-le-Dale, Hanson Grange and Cold Eaton. There are 2 carucates of land to the geld. There is land for two ploughs. It is waste.[2]The Church of St. Michael and All Angels is of Norman origin, but was restored in the 19th century
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London And North Western Railway
The London
London
and North Western Railway
Railway
(LNWR, L&NWR) was a British railway company between 1846 and 1922
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Tissington
Tissington is a village in the Derbyshire Dales district of Derbyshire, England. The appropriate civil parish is called Tissington and Lea Hall. The population of this parish at the 2011 census was 159.[1] It is part of the estate of Tissington Hall, owned by the FitzHerbert family since 1465. It is a popular tourist attraction, particularly during its well dressing week. It also gives its name to the Tissington Trail, a 13-mile (21 km) walk and cycle path which passes nearby. The Limestone Way, another long-distance path and bridleway, passes through the village itself.Contents1 History 2 Notable buildings 3 Well dressings 4 Literary connections 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Tissington (Old English "Tidsige's farm/settlement"[2]) is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Tizinctun,[3]:1413 having been given to Henry de Ferrers[4] by the King:"In Tizinctun Ulchel, Edric, Ganel, Uluiet, Wictric, Leuric, Godwin had 4 carucates of land for geld
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Fenny Bentley
Fenny Bentley is a small village and civil parish located close to Dovedale in the Derbyshire Dales district of Derbyshire, England. The population in 2009 was 305 reducing to 183 at the 2011 Census.[2] It lies two miles north of Ashbourne, on the A515 Buxton to Ashbourne Road.[3] It is the most southerly village in the Peak District.[4]Contents1 History1.1 St Edmund's Church 1.2 Beresford Family name1.2.1 Cherry Orchard Farm1.3 Tattersall Cotton Mill2 Geography2.1 Demography 2.2 Transport3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]Population change in Fenny BentleyRecords show that a settlement has existed at Fenny Bentley since being mentioned in The Domesday Book in 1086, when it was known as Benedlege. Early records of The Church of St. Edmund date back as far as 1240, with much of the available historical data that provides information on the village being associated with the church and the information recorded here
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