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Arthur Allan Thomas
Arthur Allan Thomas (born 2 January 1938[1]) is a New Zealand man who was granted a Royal Pardon and compensation after being wrongfully convicted of the murders of Harvey and Jeannette Crewe
Harvey and Jeannette Crewe
in June 1970. Thomas was married and farming a property in the Pukekawa district, south of Auckland before the case. Following the revelation that the crucial evidence against him had been faked, Thomas was pardoned and awarded NZ$950,000 in compensation for his 9 years in prison and loss of earnings
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Royal Pardon
In the English and British tradition, the royal prerogative of mercy is one of the historic royal prerogatives of the British monarch, in which he or she can grant pardons (informally known as a royal pardon) to convicted persons. The royal prerogative of mercy was originally used to permit the monarch to withdraw, or provide alternatives to death sentences; the alternative of penal transportation to "partes abroade" has been used since at least 1617.[1] It is now used to change any sentence or penalty.[2] A royal pardon does not itself overturn a conviction. Officially, this is a power of the monarch. Formally, in Commonwealth realms, this has been delegated to the Governor-General of the realm, which in practice means to government ministers who advise the monarch or viceroy, usually those responsible for justice
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The Press
The Press
The Press
is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Christchurch, New Zealand. It is owned by Fairfax Media.[1]Contents1 History 2 Today 3 Motto 4 Editors 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]Former Press Building in Cashel Street, in use by the newspaper until 1908James FitzGerald came to Lyttelton on the Charlotte Jane
Charlotte Jane
in December 1850, and was from January 1851 the first editor of the Lyttelton Times, Canterbury's first newspaper.[2] From 1853, he focussed on politics and withdrew from the Lyttelton Times.[3] After several years in England, he returned to Canterbury concerned about the proposed capital works programme of the provincial government, with his chief concern the proposed rail tunnel connecting Christchurch
Christchurch
and Lyttelton, which he thought of as fiscally irresponsible, but supported by his old newspaper, the Lyttelton Times
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Investigate (magazine)
Investigate was a current affairs magazine published in New Zealand. It had a conservative Christian editorial standpoint and published a number of controversial articles. Many of the more notable articles were critical of policies and members of the centre-left Fifth Labour Government of New Zealand which governed from December 1999 until November 2008. It was edited by Ian Wishart. New New Zealand First
New Zealand First
MP Richard Prosser used to write a column called Eyes Right in the magazine, and his book Uncommon Dissent has been heavily promoted by the group
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Crime In New Zealand
Crime in New Zealand
New Zealand
is generally measured by the number of offences being reported to police per 100,000 people. However many crimes go unreported, especially sexual crimes, and do not appear in official statistics.[1] Crime rates in New Zealand
New Zealand
rose for much of the 20th century but began to decline during the 1990s (see graph)
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New Zealand Herald
The New Zealand
New Zealand
Herald is a daily newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand, owned by New Zealand
New Zealand
Media and Entertainment. It has the largest newspaper circulation of all newspapers in New Zealand, peaking at over 200,000 copies in 2006, although circulation of the daily Herald had declined to 115,213 copies on average by December 2017.[3] Its main circulation area is the Auckland
Auckland
region
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Middlemore Hospital
Middlemore Hospital is a major public hospital in the suburb of Middlemore, Auckland, New Zealand. The hospital has approximately 800 beds. There are 24 operating theatres across two sites. Founded in 1947, Middlemore Hospital is the largest hospital in Auckland,[1] with around 4,700 staff providing treatment to more than 91,000 inpatients and over 354,000 outpatients per year (data from 2007).[2] The Emergency Department (ED) is the busiest mixed (adult / paediatric) ED in Australasia, with an annual census of 98,110 patients in 2011, and the rate of presentations to ED increasing at a rate of 5–8% per annum.[3] In 2014, Middlemore Hospital treated more general surgical patients than any other hospital in the country (11,500 patients, or over 32 admissions per day), with approximately 75% of those being emergency presentations
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Hodder And Stoughton
Hodder & Stoughton is a British publishing house, now an imprint of Hachette.Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Post-war years 1.3 21st century2 Non-fiction and imprints2.1 Flipback 2.2 Imprints3 Notable publications 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit] The firm has its origins in the 1840s, with Matthew Hodder's employment, aged fourteen, with Messrs Jackson and Walford, the official publisher for the Congregational Union. In 1861 the firm became Jackson, Walford and Hodder; but in 1868 Jackson and Walford retired, and Thomas Wilberforce Stoughton joined the firm, creating Hodder & Stoughton. Hodder & Stoughton published both religious and secular works, and its religious list contained some progressive titles. These included George Adam Smith's Isaiah for its Expositor’s Bible series, which was one of the earliest texts to identify multiple authorship in the Book of Isaiah
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New South Wales
New South Wales
Wales
(abbreviated as NSW) is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland
Queensland
to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia
Australia
to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea
Tasman Sea
to the east. The Australian Capital Territory
Australian Capital Territory
is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In March 2017[update], the population of New South Wales
Wales
was over 7.8 million,[9] making it Australia's most populous state
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Penguin Books
Peter Field, CEO Madeline McIntosh, President USAPublication types BooksImprints Penguin Classics, Viking PressOwner(s) Bertelsmann, Pearson PLCOfficial website www.penguin.comPenguin Crime (details) Penguin Books
Penguin Books
is a British publishing house. It was co-founded in 1935 by Sir Allen Lane, his brothers Richard and John[2], as a line of the publishers The Bodley Head, only becoming a separate company the following year[3]. Penguin revolutionised publishing in the 1930s through its inexpensive paperbacks, sold through Woolworths and other high street stores for sixpence, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market.[4] Penguin's success demonstrated that large audiences existed for serious books
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Evidence
Evidence, broadly construed, is anything presented in support of an assertion.[1] This support may be strong or weak. The strongest type of evidence is that which provides direct proof of the truth of an assertion. At the other extreme is evidence that is merely consistent with an assertion but does not rule out other, contradictory assertions, as in circumstantial evidence. In law, rules of evidence govern the types of evidence that are admissible in a legal proceeding. Types of legal evidence include testimony, documentary evidence,[2] and physical evidence.[3] The parts of a legal case which are not in controversy are known, in general, as the "facts of the case." Beyond any facts that are undisputed, a judge or jury is usually tasked with being a trier of fact for the other issues of a case. Evidence
Evidence
and rules are used to decide questions of fact that are disputed, some of which may be determined by the legal burden of proof relevant to the case
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Royal Commission
A Royal Commission is a major ad-hoc formal public inquiry into a defined issue in some monarchies. They have been held in the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and Saudi Arabia. A Royal Commission is similar in function to a Commission of Enquiry (or Inquiry) found in other countries such as Ireland, South Africa, and regions such as Hong Kong. It has considerable powers, generally greater even than those of a judge but restricted to the terms of reference of the Commission. The Commission is created by the Head of State (the Sovereign, or his/her representative in the form of a Governor-General or Governor) on the advice of the Government and formally appointed by letters patent. In practice—unlike lesser forms of inquiry—once a Commission has started the government cannot stop it
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David Bain
The Bain family murders
Bain family murders
were the deaths by gunshot of Robin and Margaret Bain and three of their four children – Arawa, Laniet and Stephen – in Dunedin, New Zealand, on 20 June 1994. The only suspects were David Cullen Bain, the oldest son and only survivor, and Robin Bain, the father.[1] David Bain, aged 22, was charged with five counts of murder. In May 1995 he was convicted on each of the five counts and sentenced to mandatory life in prison with a minimum non-parole period of 16 years.[2] Bain's case was taken up by businessman and former All Black
All Black
Joe Karam. In 2007, Bain's legal team, guided by Karam, successfully appealed to the Privy Council, which declared there had been a 'substantial miscarriage of justice'.[3] He was released on bail in May 2007
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