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Art Movement
An art movement is a tendency or style in art with a specific common philosophy or goal, followed by a group of artists during a restricted period of time, (usually a few months, years or decades) or, at least, with the heyday of the movement defined within a number of years
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History Of Art
The history of art is the history of any activity or product made by humans in a visual form for aesthetical or communicative purposes, expressing ideas, emotions or, in general, a worldview. Over time visual art has been classified in diverse ways, from the medieval distinction between liberal arts and mechanical arts, to the modern distinction between fine arts and applied arts, or to the many contemporary definitions, in which art is seen as a manifestation of human creativity. The subsequent expansion of the list of principal arts in the 20th century reached to nine: architecture, dance, sculpture, music, painting, poetry (described broadly as a form of literature with aesthetic purpose or function, which also includes the distinct genres of theatre and narrative), film, photography, and graphic arts
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Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot
Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot
Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot
(French: [ʒɑ̃ ba.tist ka.mij kɔ.ʁo]; July 16, 1796[1] – February 22, 1875) was a French landscape and portrait painter as well as a printmaker in etching
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The Coronation Of Napoleon
The Coronation of Napoleon (French: Le Sacre de Napoléon) is a painting completed in 1807 by Jacques-Louis David, the official painter of Napoleon, depicting the coronation of Napoleon I at Notre-Dame de Paris. The painting has imposing dimensions, as it is almost 10 metres (33 ft) wide by a little over 6 metres (20 ft) tall.Contents1 History of the work 2 Composition 3 Characters 4 References and sources4.1 References 4.2 Sources5 LinksHistory of the work[edit] The work was commissioned by Napoleon orally in September 1804 and its official title is Consecration of the Emperor Napoleon I and Coronation of the Empress Josephine in the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris on 2 December 1804. Jacques-Louis David started work on 21 December 1805 in the former chapel of the College of Cluny, near the Sorbonne, which served as a workshop. Assisted by his student Georges Rouget, he put the finishing touches in January 1808
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Musée Du Louvre
8.1 million (2017)Ranked 1st nationally Ranked 1st globallyDirector Jean-Luc MartinezCurator Marie-Laure de RochebrunePublic transit accessPalais Royal – Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Louvre-Rivoli Website www.louvre.frThe Louvre
Louvre
(US: /ˈluːv(rə)/),[1] or the Louvre
Louvre
Museum (French: Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
[myze dy luvʁ] ( listen)), is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine
Seine
in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward)
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Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
(from Greek νέος nèos, "new" and Latin
Latin
classicus, "of the highest rank")[1] is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of classical antiquity. Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism
was born in Rome
Rome
in the mid-18th century, at the time of the rediscovery of Pompeii
Pompeii
and Herculaneum, but its popularity spread all over Europe as a generation of European art students finished their Grand Tour
Grand Tour
and returned from Italy to their home countries with newly rediscovered Greco-Roman ideals.[2][3] The main Neoclassical movement coincided with the 18th-century Age of Enlightenment, and continued into the early 19th century, laterally competing with Romanticism
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Eugène Delacroix
Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix
Eugène Delacroix
(French: [ø.ʒɛn də.la.kʁwa]; 26 April 1798 – 13 August 1863) was a French Romantic artist regarded from the outset of his career as the leader of the French Romantic school.[1] As a painter and muralist, Delacroix's use of expressive brushstrokes and his study of the optical effects of colour profoundly shaped the work of the Impressionists, while his passion for the exotic inspired the artists of the Symbolist movement. A fine lithographer, Delacroix illustrated various works of William Shakespeare, the Scottish author Walter Scott
Walter Scott
and the German author Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. In contrast to the Neoclassical perfectionism of his chief rival Ingres, Delacroix took for his inspiration the art of Rubens and painters of the Venetian Renaissance, with an attendant emphasis on colour and movement rather than clarity of outline and carefully modelled form
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Liberty Leading The People
Liberty
Liberty
Leading the People (French: La Liberté guidant le peuple [la libɛʁte ɡidɑ̃ lə pœpl]) is a painting by Eugène Delacroix commemorating the July Revolution
July Revolution
of 1830, which toppled King Charles X of France. A woman personifying the concept and the Goddess of Liberty
Liberty
leads the people forward over a barricade and the bodies of the fallen, holding the flag of the French Revolution
French Revolution
– the tricolour flag, which remains France's national flag – in one hand and brandishing a bayonetted musket with the other
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Romanticism
Romanticism
Romanticism
(also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850. Romanticism
Romanticism
was characterized by its emphasis on emotion and individualism as well as glorification of all the past and nature, preferring the medieval rather than the classical
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Thomas Cole
Thomas Cole
Thomas Cole
(February 1, 1801 – February 11, 1848) was an English-born American painter known for his landscape and history paintings. He is regarded as the founder of the Hudson River School, an American art movement that flourished in the mid-19th century. Cole's work is known for its romantic portrayal of the American wilderness.[1]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Painting 3 Graphic work 4 Personal life 5 Architecture work 6 Selected works 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Born in Bolton
Bolton
le Moors, Lancashire, in 1801, Cole emigrated with his family to the United States in 1818, settling in Steubenville, Ohio. At the age of 22, Cole moved to Philadelphia and later, in 1825, to Catskill, New York, where he lived with his wife and children until 1847.[2] Cole found work early on as an engraver
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Hudson River School
The Hudson River School
Hudson River School
was a mid-19th century American art movement embodied by a group of landscape painters whose aesthetic vision was influenced by romanticism. The paintings for which the movement is named depict the Hudson River Valley and the surrounding area, including the Catskill, Adirondack, and White Mountains; eventually works by the second generation of artists associated with the school expanded to include other locales in New England, the Maritimes, the American West, and South America.Contents1 Overview 2 Founder 3 Second generation 4 Collections4.1 Public collections 4.2 Other collections5 Notable artists 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] Neither the originator of the term Hudson River School
Hudson River School
nor its first published use has been fixed with certainty
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Gustave Courbet
Jean Désiré Gustave Courbet
Gustave Courbet
(French: [ɡystav kuʁbɛ]; 10 June 1819 – 31 December 1877) was a French painter who led the Realism movement in 19th-century French painting. Committed to painting only what he could see, he rejected academic convention and the Romanticism of the previous generation of visual artists. His independence set an example that was important to later artists, such as the Impressionists and the Cubists. Courbet occupies an important place in 19th-century French painting as an innovator and as an artist willing to make bold social statements through his work. Courbet's paintings of the late 1840s and early 1850s brought him his first recognition. They challenged convention by depicting unidealized peasants and workers, often on a grand scale traditionally reserved for paintings of religious or historical subjects
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Realism (arts)
Realism in the arts is the attempt to represent subject matter truthfully, without artificiality and avoiding artistic conventions, implausible, exotic, and supernatural elements. Realism has been prevalent in the arts at many periods, and is in large part a matter of technique and training, and the avoidance of stylization. In the visual arts, illusionistic realism is the accurate depiction of lifeforms, perspective, and the details of light and colour. Realist works of art may emphasize the mundane, ugly or sordid, such as works of social realism, regionalism, or kitchen sink realism. There have been various realism movements in the arts, such as the opera style of verismo, literary realism, theatrical realism, and Italian neorealist cinema
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Ville D'Avray (painting)
Ville d’Avray is an 1865 oil painting by French artist Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. It is currently on display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.. The painting is of the commune where Corot lived in Ville d'Avray. External links[edit]Europe in the age of enlightenment and revolution, a catalog from The Metropolitan Museum of Art Libraries (fully available online as PDF), which contains material on d'Avray (see index)This France-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article about a nineteenth-century painting is a stub
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Futurism (art)
Futurism
Futurism
(Italian: Futurismo) was an artistic and social movement that originated in Italy
Italy
in the early 20th century. It emphasized speed, technology, youth, and violence, and objects such as the car, the aeroplane, and the industrial city. Although it was largely an Italian phenomenon, there were parallel movements in Russia, England, Belgium and elsewhere
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National Gallery Of Art
The National Gallery of Art, and its attached Sculpture Garden, is a national art museum in Washington, D.C., located on the National Mall, between 3rd and 9th Streets, at Constitution Avenue
Constitution Avenue
NW. Open to the public and free of charge, the museum was privately established in 1937 for the American people by a joint resolution of the United States Congress. Andrew W. Mellon
Andrew W. Mellon
donated a substantial art collection and funds for construction. The core collection includes major works of art donated by Paul Mellon, Ailsa Mellon Bruce, Lessing J. Rosenwald, Samuel Henry Kress, Rush Harrison Kress, Peter Arrell Browne Widener, Joseph E. Widener, and Chester Dale
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