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Art
Art
Art
is a diverse range of human activities in creating visual, auditory or performing artifacts (artworks), expressing the author's imaginative or technical skill, intended to be appreciated for their beauty or emotional power.[1][2] In their most general form these activities include the production of works of art, the criticism of art, the study of the history of art, and the aesthetic dissemination of art. The oldest documented forms of art are visual arts, which include creation of images or objects in fields including today painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and other visu
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Human Behavior
Human
Human
behavior is the responses of individuals or groups of humans to internal and external stimuli. It refers to the array of every physical action and observable emotion associated with individuals, as well as the human race. While specific traits of one's personality and temperament may be more consistent, other behaviors will change as one moves from birth through adulthood. In addition to being dictated by age and genetics, behavior, driven in part by thoughts and feelings, is an insight into individual psyche, revealing among other things attitudes and values
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Shisa
Shisa
Shisa
(シーサー, Shīsā, Okinawan: shiisaa) is a traditional Ryukyuan cultural artifact and decoration, often seen in similar pairs, resembling a cross between a lion and a dog, from Okinawan mythology. In magic typology, they are sometimes also classified as gargoyle beasts
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Interactive Media
Interactive media
Interactive media
normally refers to products and services on digital computer-based systems which respond to the user's actions by presenting content such as text, moving image, animation, video, audio, and video games.Contents1 Definition 2 Development 3 Terminology 4 Advantages4.1 Effects on learning 4.2 Intuitive understanding 4.3 Relationships5 Influence on families 6 Types6.1 Distributed interactive media7 Examples 8 Technologies and implementation 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksDefinition[edit] Interactive media
Interactive media
is a method of communication in which the output from the media comes from the input of the users.[1][2] Interactive media works with the user's participation
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Representation (arts)
Representation is the use of signs that stand in for and take the place of something else.[1] It is through representation that people organize the world and reality through the act of naming its elements.[1] Signs are arranged in order to form semantic constructions and express relations.[1]Bust of Aristotle, Greek philosopherFor many philosophers, both ancient and modern, man is regarded as the "representational animal" or animal symbolicum, the creature whose distinct character is the creation and the manipulation of signs – things that "stand for" or "take the place of" something else.[1] Representation has been associated with aesthetics (art) and semiotics (signs). Mitchell says "representation is an extremely elastic notion, which extends all the way from a stone representing a man to a novel representing the day in the life of several Dubliners".[1] The term 'representation' carries a range of meanings and interpretations
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Ion (dialogue)
In Plato's Ion (/ˈaɪɒn/; Greek: Ἴων) Socrates
Socrates
discusses with the titular character, a professional rhapsode who also lectures on Homer, the question of whether the rhapsode, a performer of poetry, gives his performance on account of his skill and knowledge or by virtue of divine possession. It is one of the shortest of Plato's dialogues.[1]Contents1 Dialogue summary1.1 Ion's skill: Is it genuine? (530a–533c) 1.2 The nature of poetic inspiration (533d–536d) 1.3 Ion's choice: To be skilled or inspired (536e–542a)2 Commentary 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksDialogue summary[edit] Ion's skill: Is it genuine? (530a–533c)[edit] Ion has just come from a festival of Asclepius
Asclepius
at the city of Epidaurus, after having won first prize in the competition. Socrates engages Ion in a philosophical discussion
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Agency (philosophy)
Agency is the capacity of an actor to act in a given environment.[citation needed] The capacity to act does not at first imply a specific moral dimension to the ability to make the choice to act, and moral agency is therefore a distinct concept. In sociology, an agent is an individual engaging with the social structure. Notably, though, the primacy of social structure vs. individual capacity with regard to persons' actions is debated within sociology. This debate concerns, at least partly, the level of reflexivity an agent may possess.[citation needed] Agency may either be classified as unconscious, involuntary behavior, or purposeful, goal directed activity (intentional action). An agent typically has some sort of immediate awareness of their physical activity and the goals that the activity is aimed at realizing
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Phaedrus (Plato)
The Phaedrus (/ˈfiːdrəs/; Ancient Greek: Φαῖδρος, lit. 'Phaidros'), written by Plato, is a dialogue between Plato's protagonist, Socrates, and Phaedrus, an interlocutor in several dialogues
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Epic Poetry
An epic poem, epic, epos, or epopee is a lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily involving a time beyond living memory in which occurred the extraordinary doings of the extraordinary men and women who, in dealings with the gods or other superhuman forces, gave shape to the moral universe that their descendants, the poet and his audience, must understand to understand themselves as a people or nation.[1] Another type of epic poetry is epyllion (plural: epyllia), which is a brief narrative poem with a romantic or mythological theme. The term, which means "little epic", came into use in the nineteenth century
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Imagination
Imagination, also called the faculty of imagining, is the creative ability to form images, ideas, and sensations in the mind without any immediate input of the senses (such as seeing or hearing). Imagination helps make knowledge applicable in solving problems and is fundamental to integrating experience and the learning process.[1][2][3][4] A basic training for imagination is listening to storytelling (narrative),[1][5] in which the exactness of the chosen words is the fundamental factor to "evoke worlds".[6] Imagination
Imagination
is a cognitive process used in mental functioning and sometimes used in conjunction with psychological imagery. The cognate term of mental imagery may be used in psychology for denoting the process of reviving in the mind recollections of objects formerly given in sense perception
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Dithyramb
The dithyramb (Ancient Greek: διθύραμβος, dithyrambos) was an ancient Greek hymn sung and danced in honor of Dionysus, the god of wine and fertility; the term was also used as an epithet of the god:[1] Plato, in The Laws, while discussing various kinds of music mentions "the birth of Dionysos, called, I think, the dithyramb."[2] Plato
Plato
also remarks in the Republic that dithyrambs are the clearest example of poetry in which the poet is the only speaker.[3] However, in The Apology Socrates went to the dithyrambs with some of their own most elaborate passages, asking their meaning but got a
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Chokwe People
Ambundu, Ovimbundu, Bantu Luba, Lunda, Lwena, Ovimbundu, SongoThe Chokwe people, known by many other names (including Kioko, Bajokwe, Chibokwe, Kibokwe, Ciokwe, Cokwe or Badjok), are an ethnic group of Central and Southern Africa. They are found primarily in Angola, southwestern parts of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Kinshasa to Lualaba), and northwestern parts of Zambia.[1] Demographics and language[edit] Estimated to be about 1.3 million,[1] their ancestry is likely mixed and traced to aboriginal Mbundu and Mbuti
Mbuti
Pygmies
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Wang Ximeng
Wang Ximeng
Wang Ximeng
(Chinese: 王希孟; pinyin: Wáng Xīmèng; Wade–Giles: Wang Hsi-meng) (1096–1119)[1] was a Chinese painter during the Song Dynasty, the early twelfth century. A prodigy,[1] Wang was one of the most renowned court painters of the Northern Song
Northern Song
period, and was taught personally by Emperor Huizong of Song
Emperor Huizong of Song
himself
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Commercial Art
Commercial art
Commercial art
is the art of creative services, referring to art created for commercial purposes, primarily advertising. Commercial art traditionally includes designing books, advertisements of different products, signs, posters, and other displays to promote sale or acceptance of products, services, or ideas. Skills of commercial art[edit] Most commercial artists have the ability to organize information and knowledge of fine arts, visualization and media. It is commonly used for advertising goods and services. Fine art, on the other hand, is for the artist. Commercial artists creatively think of ways to entice the viewer with digital art and photography. Communication is often vital in this field. Usually, the art department is relatively small, consisting of art directors, perhaps an assistant director, and a small staff of design and product workers
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Etymology
Etymology
Etymology
(/ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi/)[1] is the study of the history of words, their origins, and how their form and meaning have changed over time.[1] By extension, the term "the etymology (of a word)" means the origin of the particular word. For a language such as Greek with a long written history, etymologists make use of texts in these languages and texts about the languages to gather knowledge about how words were used during earlier periods of their history and when they entered the languages in question. Etymologists also apply the methods of comparative linguistics to reconstruct information about languages that are too old for any direct information to be available. By analyzing related languages with a technique known as the comparative method, linguists can make inferences about their shared parent language and its vocabulary
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Formalism (art)
In art history, formalism is the study of art by analyzing and comparing form and style—the way objects are made and their purely visual aspects. In painting, formalism emphasizes compositional elements such as color, line, shape, texture, and other perceptual aspects rather than iconography or the historical and social context. At its extreme, formalism in art history posits that everything necessary to comprehending a work of art is contained within the work of art
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