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Arminianism
Arminianism
Arminianism
is based on theological ideas of the Dutch Reformed theologian Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
(1560–1609) and his historic supporters known as Remonstrants. His teachings held to the five solae of the Reformation, but they were distinct from particular teachings of Martin Luther, Huldrych Zwingli, John Calvin, and other Protestant Reformers. Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
(Jakob Harmenszoon) was a student of Theodore Beza
Theodore Beza
(Calvin's successor) at the Theological University of Geneva
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Dutch Reformed
The Dutch Reformed
Reformed
Church (in Dutch: Nederlandse Hervormde Kerk or NHK) was the largest Christian denomination
Christian denomination
in the Netherlands
Netherlands
from the onset of the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation until 1930.[1] It was the foremost Protestant
Protestant
denomination, and—since 1892—one of the two major Reformed
Reformed
denominations along with the Reformed
Reformed
Churches in the Netherlands. It spread to the United States, South Africa, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Brazil, and various other world regions through the Dutch colonization
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Armenians
Armenians
Armenians
(Armenian: հայեր, hayer [hɑˈjɛɾ]) are an ethnic group native to the Armenian Highlands. Armenians
Armenians
constitute the main population of Armenia
Armenia
and the de facto independent Artsakh. There is a wide-ranging diaspora of around 5 million people of full or partial Armenian ancestry living outside modern Armenia. The largest Armenian populations today exist in Russia, the United States, France, Georgia, Iran, Germany, Ukraine, Lebanon, Brazil and Syria. With the exceptions of Iran
Iran
and the former Soviet states, the present-day Armenian diaspora
Armenian diaspora
was formed mainly as a result of the Armenian Genocide.[25] Most Armenians
Armenians
adhere to the Armenian Apostolic Church, a non-Chalcedonian church, which is also the world's oldest national church
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Armanism
Armanism and Ariosophy
Ariosophy
are the names of ideological systems of an esoteric nature, pioneered by Guido von List
Guido von List
and Jörg Lanz von Liebenfels respectively, in Austria
Austria
between 1890 and 1930. The term 'Ariosophy', meaning wisdom concerning the Aryans, was first coined by Lanz von Liebenfels in 1915 and became the label for his doctrine in the 1920s
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Protestantism By Country
There are more than 900 million Protestants worldwide,[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][a] among approximately 2.4 billion Christians.[10][1][11][12][b] In 2010, a total of more than 800 million included 300 million in Sub-Saharan Africa, 260 million in the Americas, 140 million in Asia-Pacific region, 100 million in Europe and 2 million in Middle East-North Africa.[2] Protestants
Protestants
account for nearly forty percent of Christians
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Criticism Of Protestantism
Criticism of Protestantism
Protestantism
covers critiques and questions raised about Protestantism, the movement based on Martin Luther's Reformation principles of 1517
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Plymouth Brethren
The Plymouth Brethren
Plymouth Brethren
are a conservative, low church, nonconformist, evangelical Christian
Christian
movement whose history can be traced to Dublin, Ireland, in the late 1820s, originating from Anglicanism.[1][2] Among other beliefs, the group emphasizes sola scriptura, the belief that the Bible
Bible
is the supreme authority for church doctrine and practice over and above any other source of authority. Plymouth Brethren
Plymouth Brethren
generally see themselves as a network of like-minded independent churches, not as a denomination. They would generally prefer that their gatherings be referred to as "assemblies" rather than "churches" but, in the interests of simplicity, this article uses both terms interchangeably. An influential figure among the early Plymouth Brethren
Plymouth Brethren
was John Nelson Darby (1800–82)
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Quakers
Quakers
Quakers
(or Friends) are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements formally known as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church.[2] Members of the various Quaker movements are all generally united in a belief in the ability of each human being to experientially access "the light within", or "that of God
God
in every person". Some may profess the priesthood of all believers, a doctrine derived from the First Epistle of Peter.[3][4][5][6] They include those with evangelical, holiness, liberal, and traditional Quaker understandings of Christianity. There are also Nontheist Quakers whose spiritual practice is not reliant on the existence of a Christian God
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Charismatic Movement
The Charismatic Movement
Charismatic Movement
is the international trend of historically mainstream Christian congregations adopting beliefs and practices similar to Pentecostalism. Fundamental to the movement is the use of spiritual gifts (charismata). Among Protestants, the movement began around 1960. Among Roman Catholics, it originated around 1967.Contents1 History 2 Beliefs 3 Denominations influenced3.1 Anglicanism 3.2 Evangelicalism 3.3 Lutheranism 3.4 Methodism 3.5 Calvinism 3.6 Adventism 3.7 Roman Catholicism 3.8 Eastern Orthodoxy4 Theologians and scholars 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] Pentecostalism
Pentecostalism
began in the early twentieth century. Its doctrinal distinctive involved a dramatic encounter with God termed baptism with the Holy Spirit
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Neo-charismatic Movement
The Neo-charismatic (also third-wave charismatic or hypercharismatic) movement is a movement within evangelical protestant Christianity which places emphasis on the use of charismata (or spiritual gifts) such as glossolalia, prophecy, divine healing, and divine revelation, which are believed to be given to them by the Holy Spirit. The Neo-charismatic movement is considered to be the "third wave" of the charismatic Christian tradition which began with Pentecostalism
Pentecostalism
(the "first wave"), and was furthered by the evangelical charismatic movement (the "second wave")
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Pietism
Pietism
Pietism
(/ˈpaɪ.ɪtɪsm/, from the word piety) was an influential movement in Lutheranism
Lutheranism
that combined its emphasis on Biblical doctrine with the Reformed emphasis on individual piety and living a vigorous Christian life.[1] Although the movement was active exclusively within Lutheranism, it had a tremendous impact on Protestantism
Protestantism
worldwide, particularly in North America and Europe. Pietism
Pietism
originated in modern Germany
Germany
in the late 17th century with the work of Philipp Spener, a Lutheran theologian whose emphasis on personal transformation through spiritual rebirth and renewal, individual devotion and piety laid the foundations for the movement
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Neo-orthodoxy
Neo-orthodoxy, in Christianity, also known as theology of crisis and dialectical theology,[1][2] was a theological movement developed in the aftermath of the First World War. The movement was largely a reaction against doctrines of 19th-century liberal theology and a reevaluation of the teachings of the Reformation.[3] Karl Barth
Karl Barth
is the leading figure associated with the movement
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Paleo-orthodoxy
Paleo-orthodoxy (from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
παλαιός "ancient" and Koine Greek ὀρθοδοξία "correct belief") is a Protestant Christian theological movement of the late 20th and early 21st centuries which focuses on the consensual understanding of the faith among the Ecumenical councils and Church Fathers
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Christian Fundamentalism
Christian fundamentalism
Christian fundamentalism
began in the late 19th and early 20th centuries among British and American Protestants[1][2] as a reaction to theological liberalism and cultural modernism. Fundamentalists argued that 19th-century modernist theologians had misinterpreted or rejected certain doctrines, especially biblical inerrancy, that they viewed as the fundamentals of the Christian faith.[3] Fundamentalists are almost always described as having a literal interpretation of the Bible
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Nondenominational Christianity
Nondenominational (or non-denominational) Christianity
Christianity
consists of churches which typically distance themselves from the confessionalism or creedalism of other Christian
Christian
communities[1] by calling themselves non-denominational. Often founded by individual pastors, they have little affiliation with historic denominations, but typically adhere to evangelical Protestantism.[2][3][4] There is no identifiable standard among such congregations. Nondenominational church congregations may establish a functional denomination by means of mutual recognition of or accountability to other congregations and leaders with commonly held doctrine, policy, and worship without formalizing external direction or oversight in such matters. Some nondenominational churches explicitly reject the idea of a formalized denominational structure as a matter of principle, holding that each congregation is better off being autonomous
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Protestant Culture
Although the Reformation
Reformation
was a religious movement, it also had a strong impact on all other aspects of life: marriage and family, education, the humanities and sciences, the political and social order, the economy, and the arts.[1][2]Contents1 The role of families, women, and sexual minorities 2 Education 3 Thought and work ethic 4 Science 5 Government 6 Rights and liberty 7 Social teaching 8 Arts 9 See also 10 ReferencesThe role of families, women, and sexual minorities[edit] All Protestant
Protestant
churches allow their clergy to marry, in contrast to the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
church
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