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Arikara
Arikara
Arikara
(English: /əˈrɪkərə/), also known as Sahnish,[2] Arikaree or Ree, are a tribe of Native Americans in North Dakota. Today, they are enrolled with the Mandan
Mandan
and the Hidatsa
Hidatsa
as the federally recognized tribe known as the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara
Arikara
Nation.Contents1 Synonymy 2 Language 3 Early history 4 Culture and lifestyle 5 History up to 1850 6 History up to 1900 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 Further reading 11 External linksSynonymy[edit] The Arikara's name is believed to mean "horns," in reference to the ancient custom of wearing two upright bones in their hair
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Karl Bodmer
Johann Carl Bodmer[1] (11 February 1809 – 30 October 1893) was a Swiss-French printmaker, etcher, lithographer, zinc engraver, draughtsman, painter, illustrator and hunter. Known as Karl Bodmer
Karl Bodmer
in literature and paintings, as a Swiss and French citizen, his name was recorded as Johann Karl Bodmer
Karl Bodmer
and Jean-Charles Bodmer, respectively. After 1843, likely as a result of the birth of his son Charles-Henry Barbizon, he began to sign his works K Bodmer. Karl Bodmer
Karl Bodmer
was well known in Germany for his watercolours, drawings and aquatints of cities and landscapes of the Rhine, Mosel and Lahn rivers
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Pierre, South Dakota
Pierre (/ˈpɪər/[6] (Lakota: čhúŋkaške;[7] "fort")) is the state capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of South Dakota, and the county seat of Hughes County.[8] The population was 13,646 at the 2010 census, making it the second-least populous state capital in the United States
United States
after Montpelier, Vermont, and the eighth-most populous city in South Dakota. Founded in 1880 on the east bank of the Missouri River
Missouri River
opposite Fort Pierre, Pierre has been the state capital since South Dakota
South Dakota
gained statehood on November 2, 1889. It was challenged by Huron for the capital and won because of its location in the geographic center of the state. Fort Pierre was named after Pierre Chouteau, Jr., a major American fur trader from St
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Crow Indian Reservation
The Crow Indian Reservation
Crow Indian Reservation
(est. 1868)[1][2] is the homeland of the Crow Tribe
Crow Tribe
of Indians of the State of Montana
Montana
in the United States. The reservation is located in parts of Big Horn, Yellowstone, and Treasure counties in southern Montana. It has a land area of 3,593.56 sq mi (9,307.27 km²) and a total area of 3,606.54 sq mi (9,340.89 km²), making it either the fifth or sixth largest reservation in the country. (Rankings are switched with the Standing Rock Indian Reservation depending on whether water areas are counted.) Reservation headquarters are in Crow Agency. The Crow Tribe
Crow Tribe
of Indians of the State of Montana
Montana
has an enrolled tribal membership of approximately 11,000, of whom 7,900 reside on the Crow Indian Reservation
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Battle Of Honsinger Bluff
The Battle of Honsinger Bluff
Battle of Honsinger Bluff
was a conflict between the United States Army and the Sioux
Sioux
people on August 4, 1873 along the Yellowstone River near present-day Miles City, Montana. This was U.S. territory acquired from the Crows in 1868. The main combatants were units of the U.S. 7th Cavalry under Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer, and Native Americans from the village of the Hunkpapa
Hunkpapa
medicine man, Sitting Bull, many of whom would clash with Custer again approximately three years later at the Battle of the Little Big Horn
Battle of the Little Big Horn
in the Crow Indian Reservation.[2]Contents1 Geography 2 Short history of the battlefield 3 Participants3.1 U.S
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Henry Dodge
  Missouri
Missouri
Militia
Militia
(1806-1827) Missouri
Missouri
State Volunteers (1812-1814)   Michigan
Michigan
Territorial Militia Michigan
Michigan
Mounted Volunteers (1832)   United States
United States
Army United States
United States
Mounted Ranger Battalion (1832-1833) United States
United States
Regiment of Dragoons (1833-1835)Rank Major General (Militias) Colonel
Colonel
(U.S. Army)Battles/wars War of 1812 Black Hawk War First Dragoon
Dragoon
Expedition Henry Dodge
Henry Dodge
(October 12, 1782 – June 19, 1867) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S
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Nebraska
Welcome to NEBRASKAland where the West begins[5]Soil Holdrege seriesSong "Beautiful Nebraska"Other River: Platte RiverState route markerState quarterReleased in 2006Lists of United States
United States
state symbols Nebraska
Nebraska
/nɪˈbræskə/ ( listen) is a state that lies in both the Great Plains
Great Plains
and the Midwestern United States. It is bordered by South Dakota
South Dakota
to the north, Iowa
Iowa
to the east and Missouri
Missouri
to the southeast, both across the Missouri
Missouri
River, Kansas
Kansas
to the south, Colorado
Colorado
to the southwest and Wyoming
Wyoming
to the west. It is the only triply landlocked U.S. state. Nebraska's area is just over 77,220 square miles (200,000 km2) with almost 1.9 million people
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Sioux
The Sioux
Sioux
/suː/ also known as Lakota, are groups of Native American tribes and First Nations
First Nations
peoples in North America. The term can refer to any ethnic group within the Great Sioux Nation
Great Sioux Nation
or to any of the nation's many language dialects. The Sioux
Sioux
comprise three major divisions based on language divisions: the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota. The Santee Dakota (Isáŋyathi; "Knife") reside in the extreme east of the Dakotas, Minnesota
Minnesota
and northern Iowa. The Yankton and Yanktonai Dakota (Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋ and Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋna; "Village-at-the-end" and "Little village-at-the-end"), collectively also referred to by the endonym Wičhíyena, reside in the Minnesota River area
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Larson Site
The Larson Site is a prehistoric archaeological site in Fulton County, Illinois, near the city of Lewistown. The site was the location of a Mississippian town and was occupied during the 13th and 14th centuries. The town was one of seven major town sites in the central Illinois River valley and served as a social and economic center for surrounding villages and farms. The artifacts uncovered at the site have been well-preserved and include both organic remains and intact homes, providing significant archaeological evidence regarding the Mississippian way of life.[2] The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places on November 21, 1978.[1] References[edit]^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.  ^ Maruszak, Kathleen. National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Larson Site
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Epidemic
An epidemic (from Greek ἐπί epi "upon or above" and δῆμος demos "people") is the rapid spread of infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time, usually two weeks or less. For example, in meningococcal infections, an attack rate in excess of 15 cases per 100,000 people for two consecutive weeks is considered an epidemic.[1][2] Epidemics of infectious disease are generally caused by several factors including a change in the ecology of the host population (e.g. increased stress or increase in the density of a vector species), a genetic change in the pathogen reservoir or the introduction of an emerging pathogen to a host population (by movement of pathogen or host)
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Bison
B. bison B. bonasus †B. antiquus †B. hanaizumiensis †B. latifrons †B. occidentalis †B. palaeosinensis †B. priscus †B. schoetensacki Bison
Bison
are large, even-toed ungulates in the genus Bison
Bison
within the subfamily Bovinae. Two extant and six extinct species are recognised. Of the six extinct species, five went extinct in the Quaternary extinction event. Bison palaeosinensis evolved in the Early Pleistocene
Pleistocene
in South Asia, and was the evolutionary ancestor of B. priscus (steppe bison), which was the ancestor of all other Bison
Bison
species. From 2 MYA to 6,000 BC, steppe bison ranged across the mammoth steppe, inhabiting Europe and northern Asia with B. schoetensacki (woodland bison), and North America with B. antiquus, B. latifrons, and B. occidentalis. The last species to go extinct, B. occidentalis, was succeeded at 3,000 BC by B
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Travois
A travois (Canadian French, from French travail, a frame for restraining horses; also obsolete travoy or travoise) is a historical frame structure that was used by indigenous peoples, notably the Plains Indians
Plains Indians
of North America, to drag loads over land.Contents1 Construction and use 2 Dog
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Smallpox
Smallpox
Smallpox
was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.[7] The last naturally occurring case was diagnosed in October 1977 and the World Health Organization certified the global eradication of the disease in 1980.[10] The risk of death following contracting the disease was about 30%, with higher rates among babies.[6][11] Often those who survive have extensive scarring of their skin and some are left blind.[6] The initial symptoms of the disease include fever and vomiting.[5] This is then followed by formation of sores in the mouth and a skin rash.[5] Ove
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Tipi
A tipi[1] (also tepee[2] or teepee[3][4]) is a cone-shaped tent, traditionally made of animal skins upon wooden poles. A tipi is distinguished from other conical tents by the smoke flaps at the top of the structure.[5][6][7] Historically, the tipi was used by Indigenous people of the Plains in the Great Plains
Great Plains
and Canadian Prairies of North America, as well as by indigenous peoples of northern Europe and Asia under other names.[8][9][10] Tipi
Tipi
lodges are still in use by these peoples, though now primarily for ceremonial purposes. Tipis are stereotypically and incorrectly associated with all Native Americans in the United States and Aboriginal people in Canada[citation needed], despite their usage being unique to the peoples of the Plains
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Nomad
A nomad (Greek: νομάς, nomas, plural tribe) is a member of a community of people who live in different locations, moving from one place to another in search of grasslands for their animals.[2] Among the various ways nomads relate to their environment, one can distinguish the hunter-gatherer, the pastoral nomad owning livestock, or the "modern" peripatetic nomad. As of 1995, there were an estimated 30–40 million nomads in the world.[3] Nomadic hunting and gathering, following seasonally available wild plants and game, is by far the oldest human subsistence method.[citation needed] Pastoralists raise herds, driving them, or moving with them, in patterns that normally avoid depleting pastures beyond their ability to recover.[citation needed] Nomadism is also a lifestyle adapted to infertile regions such as steppe, tundra, or ice and sand, where mobility is the most efficient strategy for exploiting scarce resources
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Pierre Gaultier De Varennes, Sieur De La Vérendrye
Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye
Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye
(November 17, 1685 – December 5, 1749) was a French Canadian
French Canadian
military officer, fur trader and explorer. In the 1730s he and his four sons opened up the area west of Lake Superior
Lake Superior
by establishing trading posts there. They were part of a process that added Western Canada
Western Canada
to the original New France
New France
territory that was centered along the Saint Lawrence basin. He was the first known European to reach present-day North Dakota
North Dakota
and the upper Missouri River
Missouri River
in the United States
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