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Aregund
AREGUND, AREGUNDA, ARNEGUND, AREGONDA, or ARNEGONDA (c. 515/520–580) was a Frankish queen, the wife of Clotaire I , king of the Franks , and the mother of Chilperic I of Neustria . She was the sister of Ingund , one of Clotaire's other wives. Ingund and Aregund were the daughters of Baderic , King of Thuringia. It is said that Ingund was quite alarmed at her sister staying single and asked her husband Clotaire to find Aregund
Aregund
a husband. After meeting his sister-in-law, Clotaire is rumoured to have announced to his wife that he had found her a suitable husband- himself. While Ingund bore 5 sons and one daughter, Aregund
Aregund
bore only one son. The study of Aregund's skeleton suggests she had a child when she was aged about 18. However, in Frankish society at the time, girls generally married around the age of 15. Aregund
Aregund
likely had a limp as osteo-archaeology has shown that she suffered from poliomyelitis at a young age. Clotaire may have married his sister-in-law out of pity, as she was not deemed marriageable due to her lameness. Alternatively, as the death rate from childbirth was high, Aregund
Aregund
may have succeeded her sister to foster her orphaned nephews and nieces. Ingund died between 538 and 546 AD
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Clotaire I
CHLOTHAR I (c. 497 – 29 November 561), also called "Clotaire I" and THE OLD (_le Vieux_), King of the Franks , was one of the four sons of Clovis I of the Merovingian dynasty . Although his father, Childeric I, had united Francia for the first time, Clovis I divided the kingdom between his four sons. In 511 at the age of circa 14, Clothar I inherited two large territories on the Western coast of Francia , separated by the lands of his brother Charibert I's Kingdom of Paris . Chlothar spent most of his life in an unedifying campaign to expand his territories at the expense of his relatives and neighbouring realms in all directions. His brothers avoided outright war by cooperating with his attacks on neighbouring lands in concert or by invading lands when their rulers died. The spoils were shared between the participating brothers. By the end of his life, Chlothar had managed to reunite Francia by surviving his brothers and seizing their territories after they died. But upon his own death, the Kingdom of the Franks was once again divided between his own four surviving sons. A fifth son had rebelled and was killed, along with his family
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King Of The Franks
The FRANKS were originally led by dukes (military leaders) and reguli (petty kings). The Salian Merovingians rose to dominance among the Franks and conquered most of Roman Gaul . They also conquered the Gaulish territory of the Visigothic Kingdom in 507. The sons of Clovis conquered the Burgundians and Alamanni . They acquired Provence and made the Bavarii and Thuringii their clients. The Merovingians were later replaced by a new dynasty called the Carolingians in the 8th century. By the end of the 9th century, the Carolingians themselves were replaced throughout much of their realm by other dynasties. The idea of a "King of the Franks" or _Rex Francorum_ gradually disappeared over the 12th and 13th centuries. A timeline of Frankish rulers is difficult since the realm was, according to old Germanic practice, frequently divided among the sons of a leader upon his death and then eventually reunited
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Chilperic I
CHILPERIC I (c. 539 – September 584) was the king of Neustria (or Soissons
Soissons
) from 561 to his death. He was one of the sons of the Frankish king Clotaire I and Queen Aregund . CONTENTS * 1 Life * 2 Family * 3 Etymology * 4 Cultural references * 5 Notes * 6 Sources * 7 External links LIFEImmediately after the death of his father in 561, he endeavoured to take possession of the whole kingdom, seized the treasure amassed in the royal town of Berny and entered Paris
Paris
. His brothers, however, compelled him to divide the kingdom with them, and Soissons, together with Amiens
Amiens
, Arras , Cambrai
Cambrai
, Thérouanne , Tournai
Tournai
, and Boulogne fell to Chilperic's share. His eldest brother Charibert received Paris , the second eldest brother Guntram received Burgundy with its capital at Orléans
Orléans
, and Sigebert received Austrasia . On the death of Charibert in 567, his estates were augmented when the brothers divided Charibert's kingdom among themselves and agreed to share Paris. Not long after his accession, however, he was at war with Sigebert, with whom he would long remain in a state of—at the very least—antipathy
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Neustria
NEUSTRIA (/ˈnuːstriə, ˈnjuː-/ ) or NEUSTRASIA (meaning "new land" in contrast to Austrasia ) was the western part of the Kingdom of the Franks that was created in 511 upon the division of the Merovingian kingdom of Clovis I to his four sons following his death. Neustria was made up of the regions between Aquitaine and the English Channel , approximately the north of present-day France , with Paris and Soissons as its main cities. It later referred to the region between the Seine and the Loire rivers known as the _regnum Neustriae_, a constituent subkingdom of the Carolingian Empire and then West Francia . The Carolingian kings also created a March of Neustria which was a frontier duchy against the Bretons and Vikings that lasted until the Capetian monarchy in the late 10th century, when the term was eclipsed as a European political or geographical term. Neustria was also employed as a term for northwestern Italy during the period of Lombard domination. It was contrasted with the northeast, which was called Austrasia, the same term as given to eastern Francia
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Ingund
INGONDE, INGUND, or INGUNDA (born c. 499, Thuringia
Thuringia
) was the daughter of King Baderic of Thuringia
Thuringia
(c. 480 - c. 529). She was the wife of Clotaire I and queen of the Franks
Franks
. She was the mother of Charibert I , Guntram , and Sigebert I . She was the sister of one of Clotaire\'s other wives, Aregund
Aregund
. REFERENCES * ^ Gregory of Tours , Decem Libri Historiarum, IV.3; translated by Lewis Thorpe , History of the Franks
Franks
(Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1974), p. 197f. This biography of a member of a European royal house is a stub . You can help by expanding it . * v * t * e Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title= Ingund additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
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Baderic
BADERIC, BADERICH, BALDERICH or BODERIC (ca. 480 – 529), son of Bisinus and Basina , was a co-king of the Thuringii
Thuringii
. He and his brothers Hermanfrid and Berthar succeeded their father Bisinus. After Hermanfrid defeated Berthar in battle, he invited King Theuderic I of Metz
Metz
to help him defeat Baderic in return for half of the kingdom. Theuderic I agreed and Baderic was defeated and killed in 529. Hermanfrid became the sole king. Baderic is known to have two daughters: Ingund and Aregund , who became the 3rd and 4th wives respectively of Clothar I , King of the Franks. NOTES * Victor Duruy (1918). A Short History of France. J. M. Dent. p. 86. AUTHORITY CONTROL * WorldCat Identities * VIAF : 80572618 * GND : 13618460X This biography of a member of a European royal house is a stub . You can help by expanding it . * v * t * e Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title= Baderic additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
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Radegund
RADEGUND (Latin : _Radegunda_; also spelled _Rhadegund, Radegonde, or Radigund_; c. 520 — 13 August 587) was a Thuringian princess and Frankish queen, who founded the Abbey of the Holy Cross at Poitiers
Poitiers
. She is the patron saint of several churches in France
France
and England and of Jesus College, Cambridge
Jesus College, Cambridge
(whose full name is "The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist _and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund_, near Cambridge"). CONTENTS * 1 Life * 2 Literary connections * 3 Later history * 4 References * 5 Sources * 6 External links LIFE Church of St. Radegonde, Poitiers
Poitiers
Radegund
Radegund
was born about 520 to Bertachar , one of the three kings of the German land Thuringia . Radegund's uncle, Hermanfrid , killed Bertachar in battle, and took Radegund
Radegund
into his household. After allying with the Frankish King Theuderic , Hermanfrid defeated his other brother Baderic . However, having crushed his brothers and seized control of Thuringia, Hermanfrid reneged on his agreement with Theuderic to share sovereignty. In 531, Theuderic returned to Thuringia with his brother Clotaire I (also known as Chlothar)
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Dagobert I
DAGOBERT I (Latin : _Dagobertus_; c. 603 – 19 January 639 AD) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last king of the Merovingian dynasty to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the Frankish kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica . CONTENTS * 1 Rule in Austrasia * 2 United rule * 3 Rule in Neustria, from Paris * 4 Marriage and children * 5 Coinage and treasures under Dagobert * 5.1 Treasure of Dagobert * 5.2 Coinage * 6 References * 7 Sources * 8 External links RULE IN AUSTRASIADagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II and Haldetrude (575–604). Chlothar had reigned alone over all the Franks since 613. In 623, Chlothar was forced to make Dagobert king of Austrasia by the nobility of that region, who wanted a king of their own. When Chlothar granted Austrasia to Dagobert, he initially excluded Alsace , the Vosges , and the Ardennes , but shortly thereafter the Austrasian nobility forced him to concede these regions to Dagobert. The rule of a Frank from the Austrasian heartland tied Alsace more closely to the Austrasian court
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Sarcophagus
A SARCOPHAGUS (plural, sarcophagi) is a box-like funeral receptacle for a corpse , most commonly carved in stone, and usually displayed above ground, though it may also be buried. The word "sarcophagus" comes from the Greek σάρξ _sarx_ meaning "flesh", and φαγεῖν _phagein_ meaning "to eat", hence _sarcophagus_ means "flesh-eating"; from the phrase _lithos sarkophagos_ (λίθος σαρκοφάγος). Since _lithos_ is Greek for "stone", _lithos sarcophagos_ means, "flesh-eating stone". The word also came to refer to a particular kind of limestone that was thought to decompose the flesh of corpses trapped within it. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 United States * 3 Asia * 4 Gallery * 5 References * 6 Bibliography * 7 External links HISTORY Roman-era sarcophagi at Worms, Germany . Sarcophagi were most often designed to remain above ground. In Ancient Egypt, a sarcophagus acted like an outer shell. The Hagia Triada sarcophagus is a stone sarcophagus elaborately painted in fresco ; one style of later Ancient Greek sarcophagus in painted pottery is seen in Klazomenian sarcophagi , produced around the Ionian Greek city of Klazomenai , where most examples were found, between 550 BC (Late Archaic) and 470 BC. They are made of coarse clay in shades of brown to pink. Added to the basin-like main sarcophagus is a broad, rectangular frame, often covered with a white slip and then painted
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Saint Denis Basilica
The BASILICA OF SAINT DENIS (French: Basilique royale de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is a large medieval abbey church in the city of Saint- Denis
Denis
, now a northern suburb of Paris
Paris
. The building is of unique importance historically and architecturally as its choir , completed in 1144, shows the first use of all of the elements of Gothic architecture. The site originated as a Gallo-Roman cemetery in late Roman times. The archeological remains still lie beneath the cathedral; the people buried there seem to have had a faith that was a mix of Christian and pre-Christian beliefs and practices. Around 475 St. Genevieve purchased some land and built Saint-Denys de la Chapelle . In 636 on the orders of Dagobert I the relics of Saint Denis
Denis
, a patron saint of France
France
, were reinterred in the basilica. The relics of St-Denis, which had been transferred to the parish church of the town in 1795, were brought back again to the abbey in 1819
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Archaeologist
ARCHAEOLOGY, or ARCHEOLOGY, is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture . The archaeological record consists of artifacts , architecture , biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes . Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities . In North America
North America
, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology , while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history , from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology , the study of fossil remains. To reiterate, archaeologists do not dig dinosaurs, and tend to find this misconception rather disheartening. Archaeology
Archaeology
is particularly important for learning about prehistoric societies, for whom there may be no written records to study. Prehistory
Prehistory
includes over 99% of the human past, from the Paleolithic
Paleolithic
until the advent of literacy in societies across the world
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Michel Fleury
MICHEL FLEURY (17 November 1923 in Paris
Paris
– 18 January 2002 in Paris) was a French historian, archivist and archaeologist, specialising in the history and archaeology of Paris. He is buried in the cemetery of the church of Saint-Germain de Loisé in Mortagne-au-Perche
Mortagne-au-Perche
. SOURCES * http://cths.fr/an/prosopo.php?id=100340 This article about a French historian or genealogist is a stub . You can help by expanding it . * v * t * e Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Michel_Fleury additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
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Jewellery
JEWELLERY (British English) or JEWELRY (American English) consists of small decorative items worn for personal adornment , such as brooches , rings , necklaces , earrings , pendants and bracelets . Jewellery
Jewellery
may be attached to the body or the clothes, and the term is restricted to durable ornaments, excluding flowers for example. For many centuries metal, often combined with gemstones , has been the normal material for jewellery, but other materials such as shells and other plant materials may be used. It is one of the oldest type of archaeological artefact – with 100,000-year-old beads made from _ Nassarius _ shells thought to be the oldest known jewellery. The basic forms of jewellery vary between cultures but are often extremely long-lived; in European cultures the most common forms of jewellery listed above have persisted since ancient times, while other forms such as adornments for the nose or ankle, important in other cultures, are much less common. Historically, the most widespread influence on jewellery in terms of design and style have come from Asia. The Daria-i-Noor (meaning: Sea of Light) Diamond
Diamond
from the collection of the national jewels of Iran
Iran
at Central Bank of Islamic Republic of Iran
Iran
Jewellery
Jewellery
may be made from a wide range of materials
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Digging For The Truth
DIGGING FOR THE TRUTH is a History Channel television series . The first three seasons of the show focused on host Josh Bernstein , who journeyed on various explorations of historical icons and mysteries. Bernstein is the president and CEO of BOSS (Boulder Outdoor Survival School) and has a degree in anthropology and psychology from Cornell University . The show airs every Monday night at 9:00 EST on the History Channel. The series premiered in January 2005 and has since become the highest-rated series in the history of The History Channel, which was surprising given the previous show Time Titans from the production crew never made it past the pilot. The third season premiered on January 22, 2007, with a two-hour special event on the quest for Atlantis
Atlantis
. Bernstein announced on February 20, 2007, that he would be leaving The History Channel and Digging for the Truth, and would, as of April, join The Discovery Channel as an executive producer and host of a new prime-time series and specials. Hunter Ellis , host of Tactical to Practical and Man, Moment, Machine for The History Channel, then replaced Bernstein as host. Each episode typically deals with an event or subject in history that is not completely understood by modern historians. As such, many of the topics covered are controversial in some respect
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Josh Bernstein
JOSH BERNSTEIN (born February 24, 1971) is an American explorer , author , survival expert, anthropologist, and TV host best known as the host of Digging for the Truth . He later appeared for one season as the host of the Discovery Channel 's Into the Unknown with Josh Bernstein . CONTENTS * 1 Personal life * 2 Professional life * 2.1 The History Channel: Digging for the Truth * 2.2 Boulder Outdoor Survival School * 2.3 Into The Unknown With Josh Bernstein * 2.4 Media appearances * 3 References * 4 External links PERSONAL LIFE Josh Bernstein was born and raised in Manhattan , and attended the Horace Mann School . In 1989, he went to Cornell University where he double-majored in Anthropology and Psychology , and double minored in Native American and Near Eastern Studies . He served two terms as president of the Beta Theta chapter of the