HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Aregund
AREGUND, AREGUNDA, ARNEGUND, AREGONDA, or ARNEGONDA (c. 515/520–580) was a Frankish queen, the wife of Clotaire I , king of the Franks , and the mother of Chilperic I of Neustria
Neustria
. She was the sister of Ingund , one of Clotaire's other wives. Ingund and Aregund were the daughters of Baderic , King of Thuringia. It is said that Ingund was quite alarmed at her sister staying single and asked her husband Clotaire to find Aregund
Aregund
a husband. After meeting his sister-in-law, Clotaire is rumoured to have announced to his wife that he had found her a suitable husband- himself. While Ingund bore 5 sons and one daughter, Aregund
Aregund
bore only one son. The study of Aregund's skeleton suggests she had a child when she was aged about 18
[...More...]

"Aregund" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Digging For The Truth
DIGGING FOR THE TRUTH is a History Channel television series . The first three seasons of the show focused on host Josh Bernstein , who journeyed on various explorations of historical icons and mysteries. Bernstein is the president and CEO of BOSS (Boulder Outdoor Survival School) and has a degree in anthropology and psychology from Cornell University . The show airs every Monday night at 9:00 EST on the History Channel. The series premiered in January 2005 and has since become the highest-rated series in the history of The History Channel, which was surprising given the previous show Time Titans from the production crew never made it past the pilot. The third season premiered on January 22, 2007, with a two-hour special event on the quest for Atlantis
[...More...]

"Digging For The Truth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jewellery
JEWELLERY (British English) or JEWELRY (American English) consists of small decorative items worn for personal adornment , such as brooches , rings , necklaces , earrings , pendants and bracelets . Jewellery
Jewellery
may be attached to the body or the clothes, and the term is restricted to durable ornaments, excluding flowers for example. For many centuries metal, often combined with gemstones , has been the normal material for jewellery, but other materials such as shells and other plant materials may be used. It is one of the oldest type of archaeological artefact – with 100,000-year-old beads made from Nassarius shells thought to be the oldest known jewellery
[...More...]

"Jewellery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Michel Fleury
MICHEL FLEURY (17 November 1923 in Paris – 18 January 2002 in Paris) was a French historian, archivist and archaeologist, specialising in the history and archaeology of Paris. He is buried in the cemetery of the church of Saint-Germain de Loisé in Mortagne-au-Perche . SOURCES * http://cths.fr/an/prosopo.php?id=100340 This article about a French historian or genealogist is a stub . You can help by expanding it
[...More...]

"Michel Fleury" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Josh Bernstein
JOSH BERNSTEIN (born February 24, 1971) is an American explorer , author , survival expert, anthropologist, and TV host best known as the host of Digging for the Truth . He later appeared for one season as the host of the Discovery Channel 's Into the Unknown with Josh Bernstein . CONTENTS * 1 Personal life * 2 Professional life * 2.1 The History Channel: Digging for the Truth * 2.2 Boulder Outdoor Survival School * 2.3 Into The Unknown With Josh Bernstein * 2.4 Media appearances * 3 References * 4 External links PERSONAL LIFEJosh Bernstein was born and raised in Manhattan , and attended the Horace Mann School . In 1989, he went to Cornell University where he double-majored in Anthropology and Psychology , and double minored in Native American and Near Eastern Studies
[...More...]

"Josh Bernstein" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Genetic Fingerprinting
DNA
DNA
PROFILING (also called DNA
DNA
FINGERPRINTING, DNA
DNA
TESTING, or DNA TYPING) is a forensic technique used to identify individuals by characteristics of their DNA
DNA
. A DNA
DNA
PROFILE is a small set of DNA variations that is very likely to be different in all unrelated individuals, thereby being as unique to individuals as are fingerprints (hence the alternative name for the technique). DNA profiling should not be confused with full genome sequencing . First developed and used in 1984, DNA
DNA
profiling is used in, for example, parentage testing and criminal investigation , to identify a person or to place a person at a crime scene, techniques which are now employed globally in forensic science to facilitate police detective work and help clarify paternity and immigration disputes
[...More...]

"Genetic Fingerprinting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Middle East
The MIDDLE EAST is a transcontinental region centered on Western Asia
Asia
, Turkey
Turkey
(both Asian and European ), and Egypt
Egypt
(which is mostly in North Africa
North Africa
). The corresponding adjective is Middle Eastern and the derived noun is Middle Easterner. The term has come into wider usage as a replacement of the term Near East (as opposed to the Far East ) beginning in the early 20th century. Arabs
Arabs
, Turks , Persians , Kurds
Kurds
, and Azeris (excluding Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
) constitute the largest ethnic groups in the region by population
[...More...]

"Middle East" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Archaeologist
ARCHAEOLOGY, or ARCHEOLOGY, is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture . The archaeological record consists of artifacts , architecture , biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes . Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities . In North America
North America
, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology , while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history , from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology , the study of fossil remains
[...More...]

"Archaeologist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Saint Denis Basilica
The BASILICA OF SAINT DENIS (French: Basilique royale de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is a large medieval abbey church in the city of Saint- Denis , now a northern suburb of Paris . The building is of unique importance historically and architecturally as its choir , completed in 1144, shows the first use of all of the elements of Gothic architecture. The site originated as a Gallo-Roman cemetery in late Roman times. The archeological remains still lie beneath the cathedral; the people buried there seem to have had a faith that was a mix of Christian and pre-Christian beliefs and practices. Around 475 St. Genevieve purchased some land and built Saint-Denys de la Chapelle . In 636 on the orders of Dagobert I the relics of Saint Denis , a patron saint of France , were reinterred in the basilica
[...More...]

"Saint Denis Basilica" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neustria
NEUSTRIA (/ˈnuːstriə, ˈnjuː-/ ) or NEUSTRASIA (meaning "new land" in contrast to Austrasia
Austrasia
) was the western part of the Kingdom of the Franks
Franks
that was created in 511 upon the division of the Merovingian
Merovingian
kingdom of Clovis I
Clovis I
to his four sons following his death. Neustria
Neustria
was made up of the regions between Aquitaine
Aquitaine
and the English Channel , approximately the north of present-day France
France
, with Paris and Soissons
Soissons
as its main cities
[...More...]

"Neustria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dagobert I
DAGOBERT I (Latin : Dagobertus; c. 603 – 19 January 639 AD) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last king of the Merovingian
Merovingian
dynasty to wield any real royal power. Dagobert was the first of the Frankish kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica . CONTENTS * 1 Rule in Austrasia * 2 United rule * 3 Rule in Neustria, from Paris
Paris
* 4 Marriage and children * 5 Coinage and treasures under Dagobert * 5.1 Treasure of Dagobert * 5.2 Coinage * 6 References * 7 Sources * 8 External links RULE IN AUSTRASIADagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II
Chlothar II
and Haldetrude (575–604)
[...More...]

"Dagobert I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sarcophagus
A SARCOPHAGUS (plural, sarcophagi) is a box-like funeral receptacle for a corpse , most commonly carved in stone, and usually displayed above ground, though it may also be buried. The word "sarcophagus" comes from the Greek σάρξ sarx meaning "flesh", and φαγεῖν phagein meaning "to eat", hence sarcophagus means "flesh-eating"; from the phrase lithos sarkophagos (λίθος σαρκοφάγος). Since lithos is Greek for "stone", lithos sarcophagos means, "flesh-eating stone". The word also came to refer to a particular kind of limestone that was thought to decompose the flesh of corpses trapped within it. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 United States * 3 Asia * 4 Gallery * 5 References * 6 Bibliography * 7 External links HISTORY Roman-era sarcophagi at Worms, Germany . Sarcophagi were most often designed to remain above ground. In Ancient Egypt, a sarcophagus acted like an outer shell
[...More...]

"Sarcophagus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Radegund
RADEGUND (Latin : Radegunda; also spelled Rhadegund, Radegonde, or Radigund; c. 520 — 13 August 587) was a Thuringian princess and Frankish queen, who founded the Abbey of the Holy Cross at Poitiers
Poitiers
. She is the patron saint of several churches in France
France
and England and of Jesus College, Cambridge
Jesus College, Cambridge
(whose full name is "The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund, near Cambridge"). CONTENTS * 1 Life * 2 Literary connections * 3 Later history * 4 References * 5 Sources * 6 External links LIFE Church of St. Radegonde, Poitiers
Poitiers
Radegund
Radegund
was born about 520 to Bertachar , one of the three kings of the German land Thuringia
Thuringia

[...More...]

"Radegund" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ingund
INGONDE, INGUND, or INGUNDA (born c. 499, Thuringia
Thuringia
) was the daughter of King Baderic of Thuringia
Thuringia
(c. 480 - c. 529). She was the wife of Clotaire I
Clotaire I
and queen of the Franks
Franks
. She was the mother of Charibert I
Charibert I
, Guntram
Guntram
, and Sigebert I
Sigebert I
. She was the sister of one of Clotaire\'s other wives, Aregund
Aregund
. REFERENCES * ^ Gregory of Tours
Gregory of Tours
, Decem Libri Historiarum, IV.3; translated by Lewis Thorpe , History of the Franks
Franks
(Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1974), p. 197f. This biography of a member of a European royal house is a stub
[...More...]

"Ingund" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Baderic
BADERIC, BADERICH, BALDERICH or BODERIC (ca. 480 – 529), son of Bisinus and Basina , was a co-king of the Thuringii
Thuringii
. He and his brothers Hermanfrid and Berthar succeeded their father Bisinus. After Hermanfrid defeated Berthar in battle, he invited King Theuderic I
Theuderic I
of Metz
Metz
to help him defeat Baderic in return for half of the kingdom. Theuderic I
Theuderic I
agreed and Baderic was defeated and killed in 529. Hermanfrid became the sole king. Baderic is known to have two daughters: Ingund and Aregund
Aregund
, who became the 3rd and 4th wives respectively of Clothar I , King of the Franks. NOTES * Victor Duruy (1918). A Short History of France. J. M. Dent. p
[...More...]

"Baderic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.