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Ardkinglas Castle
Ardkinglas
Ardkinglas
House is a Category A listed country house on the Ardkinglas
Ardkinglas
Estate in Argyll, Scotland.[1] The estate lies on the eastern shore of Loch Fyne, and the house is located close to the village of Cairndow. Dating back to the 14th century and originally a Campbell property, the estate now covers more than 12,000 acres (4,900 ha) of rolling hills and landscaped parkland. The centre of the estate was Ardkinglas
Ardkinglas
Castle until this was replaced by a new house in the 18th century. This house was itself replaced by the present Ardkinglas
Ardkinglas
House in the early 20th century, designed by Sir Robert Lorimer
Robert Lorimer
for Sir Andrew Noble.[1] It remains the property of the Noble family, and is open to the public on a limited basis
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Cairndow
Cairndow; (Scottish Gaelic: An Càrn Dubh) is a coastal hamlet, on the Cowal
Cowal
peninsula in Argyll and Bute, Scottish Highlands. The town lies between the A83 road
A83 road
and the head of Loch Fyne. Cairndow's school closed in 1988 after the roll fell to just 3 pupils. Now children in the area are sent to the primary school in Strachur and the secondary school in Dunoon. Medical facilities for the hamlet are provided by the GP in Strachur. Kilmorich Church at Cairndow
Cairndow
was built in 1818 and is a category A listed building.[3] After originating as an oyster farm in the loch, Loch Fyne
Loch Fyne
Oysters opened its Loch Fyne
Loch Fyne
Oyster Bar in 1988 at Clachan, across the head of the loch from Cairndow
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Narrow Gauge Railway
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA narrow-gauge railway (narrow-gauge railroad in the US) is a railway with a track gauge narrower than the standard 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in). Most narrow-gauge railways are between 600 mm (1 ft 11 5⁄8 in) and 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in). Since narrow-gauge railways are usually built with smaller radius curves, smaller structure gauges and lighter rails, they can be less-costly to build, equip and operate than standard- or broad-gauge railways (particularly in mountainous or difficult terrain). Lower-cost narrow-gauge railways are often built to serve industries and communities where the traffic potential would not justify the cost of a standard- or broad-gauge line. Narrow-gauge railways have specialized use in mines and other environments, where a small structure gauge necessitates a small loading gauge
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Newcastle Upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
(RP: /ˌnjuːkɑːsəl əpɒn ˈtaɪn/ ( listen);[4] locally: /njuːˌkæsəl əpən ˈtaɪn/ ( listen)),[4] commonly known as Newcastle, is a city in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 103 miles (166 km) south of Edinburgh
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Hydroelectricity
Hydroelectricity
Hydroelectricity
is electricity produced from hydropower. In 2015 hydropower generated 16.6% of the world's total electricity and 70% of all renewable electricity,[1] and was expected to increase about 3.1% each year for the next 25 years. Hydropower
Hydropower
is produced in 150 countries, with the Asia-Pacific
Asia-Pacific
region generating 33 percent of global hydropower in 2013. China
China
is the largest hydroelectricity producer, with 920 TWh
TWh
of production in 2013, representing 16.9 percent of domestic electricity use. The cost of hydroelectricity is relatively low, making it a competitive source of renewable electricity. The hydro station consumes no water, unlike coal or gas plants. The average cost of electricity from a hydro station larger than 10 megawatts is 3 to 5 U.S
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Loch Fyne Oysters
Coordinates: 56°16′21″N 4°55′38″W / 56.272591°N 4.927201°W / 56.272591; -4.927201The original Loch Fyne
Loch Fyne
Oyster
Oyster
Bar at Clachan, near Cairndow. Loch Fyne
Loch Fyne
Oysters is a seafoods, fish, meat, oysters and game company which and also founded the Loch Fyne
Loch Fyne
restaurant chain which is now owned by Greene King; it still owns the Loch Fyne
Loch Fyne
brand and supplies its products to the restaurant chain. The company continues to run the Loch Fyne
Loch Fyne
Oyster
Oyster
Bar on the banks of Loch Fyne
Loch Fyne
at Clachan near CairndowContents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The company takes its name from Loch Fyne, a sea loch on the west coast of Scotland. The business started life in 1979 as an oyster farm in that loch
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The Crow Road (TV Series)
A road is a thoroughfare, route, or way on land between two places that has been paved or otherwise improved to allow travel by foot or some form of conveyance, including a motor vehicle, cart, bicycle, or horse. Roads consist of one or two roadways (British English: carriageways), each with one or more lanes and any associated sidewalks (British English: pavement) and road verges
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The Water Horse
The Water Horse: Legend of the Deep (stylised on-screen as simply The Water Horse) is a 2007 family fantasy drama film directed by Jay Russell and written by Robert Nelson Jacobs, based on Dick King-Smith's children's novel The Water Horse. It stars Alex Etel as a 10-year-old young boy who discovers a mysterious egg and cares for what hatches out of it: a "water horse" (loosely based on the Celtic water horse) which later becomes the fabled Loch Ness Monster. The film also stars Emily Watson, Ben Chaplin and David Morrissey. The film was produced by Revolution Studios and Walden Media, in collaboration with Beacon Pictures, and was distributed by Columbia Pictures
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Abies Grandis
Abies grandis
Abies grandis
(grand fir, giant fir, lowland white fir, great silver fir, western white fir, Vancouver fir, or Oregon
Oregon
fir) is a fir native to the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
and Northern California
Northern California
of North America, occurring at altitudes of sea level to 1,800 m. It is a major constituent of the Grand Fir/Douglas Fir
Fir
Ecoregion of the Cascade Range. The tree typically grows to 40–70 m in height. There are two varieties, the taller coast grand fir, found west of the Cascade Mountains, and the shorter interior grand fir, found east of the Cascades. It was first described in 1831 by David Douglas.[2] It is closely related to white fir. The bark has historical medicinal properties, and it is popular in the United States
United States
as a Christmas tree
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Abies Alba
Abies alba, the European silver fir or silver fir,[3] is a fir native to the mountains of Europe, from the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
north to Normandy, east to the Alps
Alps
and the Carpathians, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Serbia
Serbia
and south to Italy, Bulgaria
Bulgaria
and northern Greece.[1]Silver fir trunk and bark of a tree in Vallombrosa State Forest (Italy)Illustration of several parts of the Abies albaImmature cone of Abies albaSeedlings of Abies albaContents1 Description 2 Ecology 3 Chemistry and pharmacology 4 Uses 5 Etymology 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit] Abies alba
Abies alba
is a large evergreen coniferous tree growing to 40–50 m (130–160 ft) (exceptionally 60 m (200 ft)) tall and with a trunk diameter up to 1.5 m (4 ft 11 in)
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Track Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eIn rail transport, track gauge is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails. All vehicles on a rail network must have running gear that is compatible with the track gauge, and in the earliest days of railways the selection of a proposed railway's gauge was a key issue
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Estate Railway
There were more than a thousand British narrow-gauge railways ranging from large, historically significant common carriers to small, short-lived industrial railways. Many notable events in British railway history happened on narrow-gauge railways including the first use of steam locomotives, the first public railway and the first preserved railway.Contents1 History1.1 Early railways: before 1865 1.2 The boom years: 1865–1900 1.3 Decline of the narrow gauge: 1900–1950 1.4 The narrow gauge after 19502 Significant lines 3 The narrow-gauge railways of Britain and the Isle of Man3.1 Public railways 3.2 Estate railways 3.3 Museums 3.4 Visitor attractions 3.5 Private railways 3.6 Industrial railways 3.7 Military railways4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Early railways: before 1865[edit]The Surrey Iron Railway, the first public railway in the worldThe earliest narrow-gauge railways were crude wooden trackways used in coal mines to guide wooden tubs
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Artillery
Artillery
Artillery
is a class of large military weapons built to fire munitions far beyond the range and power of infantry's small arms. Early artillery development focused on the ability to breach fortifications, and led to heavy, fairly immobile siege engines. As technology improved, lighter, more mobile field artillery developed for battlefield use. This development continues today; modern self-propelled artillery vehicles are highly mobile weapons of great versatility providing the largest share of an army's total firepower. In its earliest sense, the word artillery referred to any group of soldiers primarily armed with some form of manufactured weapon or armour. Since the introduction of gunpowder and cannon, the word "artillery" has largely meant cannon, and in contemporary usage, it usually refers to shell-firing guns, howitzers, mortars, rockets and guided missiles
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Steam Locomotive
A steam locomotive is a type of railway locomotive that produces its pulling power through a steam engine. These locomotives are fueled by burning combustible material – usually coal, wood, or oil – to produce steam in a boiler. The steam moves reciprocating pistons which are mechanically connected to the locomotive's main wheels (drivers). Both fuel and water supplies are carried with the locomotive, either on the locomotive itself or in wagons (tenders) pulled behind. Steam locomotives were first developed in Great Britain during the early 19th century and used for railway transport until the middle of the 20th century. The first steam locomotive, made by Richard Trevithick, first operated on 21 February 1804, three years after the road locomotive he made in 1801
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Tayvallich
Tayvallich, pronounced "Tay-vee-al-ich" (Scottish Gaelic: Taigh a' Bhealaich Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [t̪ʰɤj ə ˈvjal̪ˠɪç]), is a small village in the Knapdale
Knapdale
area of Argyll and Bute, in Scotland. The village name has its origins in Gaelic, and means the "house of the pass".[1] The village is built around a sheltered harbour on Loch
Loch
Sween. It has a primary school, caravan park, pub and village store. The local economy is based on tourism and fishing. There is also a local bus service that takes the older children to nearby Lochgilphead
Lochgilphead
where the nearest high school is situated. Tayvallich
Tayvallich
has become a popular sailing centre
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Loch Sween
Loch Sween is a sea loch located near Lochgilphead, Argyll and Bute, Scotland. Castle Sween is located on the southern shore towards the seaward end of the loch. The village of Tayvallich, a favoured haven for water craft as it sits at the head of sheltered Loch a' Bhealaich, lies on the northern shore. The shape of the loch, which is oriented from south west to north east, is complex. The inner, eastern end has several inlets. Caol Scotnish is a very narrow finger that reaches further north and east than the main body of water. Loch a' Bhealaich is to its south and west. There is the small, bridged embayment of Loch Craiglin on the south side of the inner loch and another larger inlet incorporating Bàgh na h-Araich Glaise that leads to the settlement of Achnamara. Linne Mhuirich is a long narrow inlet about halfway down the loch on the north side. The bay of Ceann an t-Sàilein lies between the island of Danna and the main loch at the western end
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