HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Archaeological Site
An archaeological site is a place (or group of physical sites) in which evidence of past activity is preserved (either prehistoric or historic or contemporary), and which has been, or may be, investigated using the discipline of archaeology and represents a part of the archaeological record. Sites may range from those with few or no remains visible above ground, to buildings and other structures still in use.An archaeological site with human presence dating from 4th century BC, Fillipovka, South Urals, Russia. This site has been interpreted as a Sarmatian
Sarmatian
Kurgan. Pulli settlement
Pulli settlement
is the oldest known settlement in Estonia
Estonia
and it dates back around 11,000 years
[...More...]

"Archaeological Site" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

MOS
Mos may refer to:Contents1 Government and military 2 Places 3 Technology3.1 Computing4 Other uses 5 See alsoGovernment and military[edit]Master of the Sword, the title for the head of physical education at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point Member of Service, term used to describe any emergency responder (police officer, firefighter, emergency medical technician) that needs emergency help, usually over two-way radio Military occupation specialty code, used by the U.S
[...More...]

"MOS" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mesolithic
In Old World archaeology, the Mesolithic
Mesolithic
(Greek: μέσος, mesos "middle"; λίθος, lithos "stone") is the period between Paleolithic
Paleolithic
and Neolithic, the three periods together forming the Stone Age. The term "Epipaleolithic" is often used for areas outside northern Europe, but was also the preferred synonym used by French archaeologists until the 1960s. The type of culture associated with the Mesolithic
Mesolithic
varies between areas, but it is associated with a decline in the group hunting of large animals in favour of a broader hunter-gatherer way of life, and the development of more sophisticated and typically smaller lithic tools and weapons than the heavy chipped equivalents typical of the Paleolithic
[...More...]

"Mesolithic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Site Survey
Site surveys are inspections of an area where work is proposed, to gather information for a design or an estimate to complete the initial tasks required for an outdoor activity. It can determine a precise location, access, best orientation for the site and the location of obstacles. The type of site survey and the best practices required depend on the nature of the project.[1] Examples of projects requiring a preliminary site survey include urban construction,[2] specialized construction (such as the location for a telescope)[3] and wireless network design.[4] In hydrocarbon exploration, for example, site surveys are run over the proposed locations of offshore exploration or appraisal wells.[5] They consist typically of a tight grid of high resolution (high frequency) reflection seismology profiles to look for possible gas hazards in the shallow section beneath the seabed and detailed bathymetric data to look for possible obstacles on the seafloor (e.g
[...More...]

"Site Survey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Valletta Treaty
The Valletta
Valletta
Treaty
Treaty
(formally the European Convention on the Protection of the Archaeological Heritage (Revised), also known as the Malta Convention) is a multilateral treaty of the Council of Europe. The 1992 treaty aims to protect the European archaeological heritage "as a source of European collective memory and as an instrument for historical and scientific study". All remains and objects and any other traces of humankind from past times are considered to be elements of the archaeological heritage. The archaeological heritage shall include structures, constructions, groups of buildings, developed sites, moveable objects, monuments of other kinds as well as their context, whether situated on land or under water." (Art. 1) The Valletta
Valletta
Convention is an international legally binding treaty within Europe
[...More...]

"Valletta Treaty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mexico
Coordinates: 23°N 102°W / 23°N 102°W / 23; -102United Mexican States Estados Unidos Mexicanos  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himno Nacional Mexicano" (English: "Mexican National Anthem")Capital and largest city Mexico
Mexico
City 19°26′N 99°08′W / 19.433°N 99.133°W / 19.433; -99.133Official languagesNone at federal level[b] Spanish (de facto)Recognized regional languagesSpanish 68 native languages[1]National language Spanish[b]Religion83% Roman Catholicism 10% Other Christian 0.2% Othe
[...More...]

"Mexico" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zapotec Civilization
The Zapotec civilization
Zapotec civilization
was an indigenous pre-Columbian civilization that flourished in the Valley of Oaxaca
Oaxaca
in Mesoamerica. Archaeological evidence shows that their culture goes back at least 2,500 years. The Zapotec left archaeological evidence at the ancient city of Monte Albán in the form of buildings, ball courts, magnificent tombs and grave goods including finely worked gold jewelry
[...More...]

"Zapotec Civilization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Urban Archaeology
Urban archaeology is a sub discipline of archaeology specialising in the material past of towns and cities where long-term human habitation has often left a rich record of the past. Humans produce waste: Large concentrations of humans produce large concentrations of waste. Kitchen waste, broken objects, and similar material all need to be disposed of. Small numbers of people can dispose of their waste locally without encouraging vermin or endangering their health. Once people began to live together in large numbers, around five thousand years ago, such methods began to become impractical. Material would be brought into these new settlements but would rarely be taken out again. [clarification needed] Up until the nineteenth century when organised rubbish disposal became widespread in urban areas people invariably threw their waste from their windows or buried it in their gardens
[...More...]

"Urban Archaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hillwash
Colluvium
Colluvium
(also colluvial material or colluvial soil) is a general name for loose, unconsolidated sediments that have been deposited at the base of hillslopes by either rainwash, sheetwash, slow continuous downslope creep, or a variable combination of these processes. Colluvium
Colluvium
is typically composed of a heterogeneous range of rock types and sediments ranging from silt to rock fragments of various sizes. This term is also used to specifically refer to sediment deposited at the base of a hillslope by unconcentrated surface runoff or sheet erosion.Contents1 Location 2 Importance 3 Colluvium
Colluvium
vs alluvium 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLocation[edit] Colluviation refers to the buildup of colluvium at the base of a hillslope.[1][2] Colluvium
Colluvium
is typically loosely consolidated angular material located at the base of a steep hill slope or cliff
[...More...]

"Hillwash" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Colluviation
Colluvium
Colluvium
(also colluvial material or colluvial soil) is a general name for loose, unconsolidated sediments that have been deposited at the base of hillslopes by either rainwash, sheetwash, slow continuous downslope creep, or a variable combination of these processes. Colluvium
Colluvium
is typically composed of a heterogeneous range of rock types and sediments ranging from silt to rock fragments of various sizes. This term is also used to specifically refer to sediment deposited at the base of a hillslope by unconcentrated surface runoff or sheet erosion.Contents1 Location 2 Importance 3 Colluvium
Colluvium
vs alluvium 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLocation[edit] Colluviation refers to the buildup of colluvium at the base of a hillslope.[1][2] Colluvium
Colluvium
is typically loosely consolidated angular material located at the base of a steep hill slope or cliff
[...More...]

"Colluviation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jungle
A jungle is land covered with dense vegetation dominated by trees. Application of the term has varied greatly during the past recent centuries. Prior to the 1970s, tropical rainforests were generally referred to as jungles but this terminology has fallen out of usage. Jungles in Western literature can represent a less civilised or unruly space outside the control of civilisation: attributed to the jungle's association in colonial discourse with places colonised by Europeans.Contents1 Etymology 2 Wildlife 3 Varying usage3.1 As dense and impenetrable vegetation 3.2 As moist forest 3.3 As metaphor4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word jungle originates from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word Jangla (Sanskrit: जङ्गल), meaning uncultivated land
[...More...]

"Jungle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aeolian Processes
Aeolian processes, also spelled eolian or æolian, pertain to wind activity in the study of geology and weather and specifically to the wind's ability to shape the surface of the Earth
Earth
(or other planets). Winds may erode, transport, and deposit materials and are effective agents in regions with sparse vegetation, a lack of soil moisture and a large supply of unconsolidated sediments
[...More...]

"Aeolian Processes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alluvial
Alluvium
Alluvium
(from the Latin
Latin
alluvius, from alluere, "to wash against") is loose, unconsolidated (not cemented together into a solid rock) soil or sediments, which has been eroded, reshaped by water in some form, and redeposited in a non-marine setting.[1][2] Alluvium
Alluvium
is typically made up of a variety of materials, including fine particles of silt and clay and larger particles of sand and gravel. When this loose alluvial material is deposited or cemented into a lithological unit, or lithified, it is called an alluvial deposit.[3]Contents1 Definitions 2 Age 3 Ores 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDefinitions[edit] The term "alluvium" is not typically used in situations where the formation of the sediment can clearly be attributed to another geologic process that is well described
[...More...]

"Alluvial" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Environmental Archaeology
Environmental archaeology is a sub-field of archaeology and is the science of reconstructing the relationships between past societies and the environments they lived in.[1][2] The field represents an archaeological-palaeoecological approach to studying the palaeoenvironment through the methods of human palaeoecology. Reconstructing past environments and past peoples' relationships and interactions with the landscapes they inhabited provides archaeologists with insights into the origin and evolution of anthropogenic environments, and prehistoric adaptations and economic practices.[3] Environmental archaeology is commonly divided into three sub-fields:archaeobotany (the study of p
[...More...]

"Environmental Archaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prehistoric
Human prehistory is the period between the use of the first stone tools c. 3.3 million years ago and the invention of writing systems. The earliest writing systems appeared c. 5,300 years ago, but writing was not used in some human cultures until the 19th century or even later. The end of prehistory therefore came at very different dates in different places, and the term is less often used in discussing societies where prehistory ended relatively recently. Sumer
Sumer
in Mesopotamia, the Indus valley civilisation
Indus valley civilisation
and ancient Egypt were the first civilisations to develop their own scripts, and to keep historical records; this took place already during the early Bronze Age. Neighbouring civilizations were the first to follow. Most other civilizations reached the end of prehistory during the Iron
Iron
Age
[...More...]

"Prehistoric" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.