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Arch Of Hadrian (Athens)
Hadrian
Hadrian
(/ˈheɪdriən/; Latin: Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus; 24 January 76 – 10 July 138 AD) was Roman emperor
Roman emperor
from 117 to 138.[note 1] He was born Publius Aelius Hadrianus, probably at Italica, near Santiponce
Santiponce
(in modern-day Spain), into a Hispano-Roman family with centuries-old roots in Hispania. His father was a maternal first cousin of the emperor Trajan. Some years before Hadrian's accession, he married Trajan's grand-niece, Vibia Sabina. Trajan's wife and Empress, Pompeia Plotina, and his close friend and adviser Licinius Sura, were well disposed towards Hadrian
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Adrian (other)
Adrian
Adrian
is a masculine given name. Adrian
Adrian
may also refer to:Contents1 Places1.1 Romania 1.2 United States2 People 3 Other uses 4 See alsoPlaces[edit] Romania[edit]
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Philhellene
Philhellenism
Philhellenism
("the love of Greek culture") and philhellene ("the admirer of Greeks
Greeks
and everything Greek"), from the Greek φίλος philos "friend, lover" and ἑλληνισμός hellenism "Greek", was an intellectual fashion prominent mostly at the turn of the 19th century
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Roman Armenia
Roman Armenia
Armenia
refers to the rule of parts of Greater Armenia
Armenia
by the Roman Empire, from the 1st century AD to the end of Late Antiquity. While Armenia
Armenia
Minor had become a client state and incorporated into the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
proper during the 1st century AD, Greater Armenia remained an independent kingdom under the Arsacid dynasty
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Roman Dacia
Roman Dacia
Dacia
(also Dacia
Dacia
Traiana " Trajan
Trajan
Dacia" or Dacia
Dacia
Felix "Happy Dacia") was a province of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
from 106 to 274–275 AD. Its territory consisted of eastern and south-eastern Transylvania, the Banat
Banat
and Oltenia
Oltenia
(regions of modern Romania). It was from the very beginning organized as an imperial province, fitting a border area, and remained so throughout the Roman occupation. Historians' estimates of the population of Roman Dacia
Dacia
range from 650,000 to 1,200,000.[1] The conquest of Dacia
Dacia
was completed by Emperor Trajan
Trajan
(98–117) after two major campaigns against Decebalus' Dacian kingdom
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Hadrian's Wall
Hadrian's Wall
Hadrian's Wall
(Latin: Vallum Aelium), also called the Roman Wall, Picts' Wall, or Vallum Hadriani in Latin, was a defensive fortification in the Roman province
Roman province
of Britannia, begun in AD 122 in the reign of the emperor Hadrian. It ran from the banks of the River Tyne near the North Sea to the Solway Firth
Solway Firth
on the Irish Sea, and was the northern limit of the Roman Empire, immediately north of which were the lands of the northern Ancient Britons, including the Picts. It had a stone base and a stone wall. There were milecastles with two turrets in between. There was a fort about every five Roman miles. From north to south, the wall comprised a ditch, wall, military way and vallum, another ditch with adjoining mounds. It is thought the milecastles were staffed with static garrisons, whereas the forts had fighting garrisons of infantry and cavalry
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Roman Britain
Roman Britain
Roman Britain
(Latin: Britannia
Britannia
or, later, Britanniae, "the Britains") was the area of the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
that was governed by the Roman Empire, from 43 to 410 AD.[1]:129–131[2]
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Bar Kokhba Revolt
Decisive Roman victory:An all-out defeat of Judean rebels Large-scale destruction of Judean population by Roman troops Suppression of Jewish
Jewish
religious and political autonomy by Hadrian Jews banned from JerusalemTerritorial changes Judea
Judea
renamed and merged into the Syria Palaestina
Syria Palaestina
province.Belligerents Roman Empire Judeans under Bar KokhbaCommanders and leaders Hadrian Tineius Rufus (DOW) Sextus Julius Severus Publicius Marcellus T. Haterius Nepos Q
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Judaea Province
The Roman province of Judea (Hebrew: יהודה‎, Standard Yehuda Tiberian Yehûḏāh; Arabic: يهودا‎; Greek: Ἰουδαία Ioudaia; Latin: Iūdaea), sometimes spelled in its original Latin forms of Iudæa or Iudaea to distinguish it from the geographical region of Judea, incorporated the regions of Judea, Samaria and Idumea, and extended over parts of the former regions of the Hasmonean and Herodian kingdoms of Israel. It was named after Herod Archelaus's Tetrarchy of Judea, but the Roman province encompassed a much larger territory. The name "Judea" was derived from the Kingdom of Judah of the 6th century BCE. The province of Judea was the scene of unrest at its founding in 6 CE during the Census of Quirinius and several wars were fought in its history, known as the Jewish–Roman Wars
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Pantheon, Rome
The Pantheon (/ˈpænθiən/ or US: /ˈpænθiɒn/;[1] Latin: Pantheum,[nb 1] from Greek Πάνθειον Pantheion, "[temple] of all the gods") is a former Roman temple, now a church, in Rome, Italy, on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa
Marcus Agrippa
during the reign of Augustus
Augustus
(27 BC – 14 AD). The present building was completed by the emperor Hadrian
Hadrian
and probably dedicated about 126 AD. He retained Agrippa's original inscription, which has caused confusion over its date of construction as the original Pantheon burned down, so it is not certain when the present one was built.[2] The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky
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Temple Of Venus And Roma
The Temple
Temple
of Venus and Roma (Latin: Templum Veneris et Romae) is thought to have been the largest temple in Ancient Rome. Located on the Velian Hill, between the eastern edge of the Forum Romanum
Forum Romanum
and the Colosseum, it was dedicated to the goddesses Venus Felix ("Venus the Bringer of Good Fortune") and Roma Aeterna
Roma Aeterna
("Eternal Rome"). The architect was the emperor Hadrian
Hadrian
and construction began in 121. It was officially inaugurated by Hadrian
Hadrian
in 135, and finished in 141 under Antoninus Pius
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Serapeum Of Alexandria
The Serapeum
Serapeum
of Alexandria
Alexandria
in the Ptolemaic Kingdom
Ptolemaic Kingdom
was an ancient Greek temple built by Ptolemy III Euergetes
Ptolemy III Euergetes
(reigned 246–222 BCE) and dedicated to Serapis, who was made the protector of Alexandria. There are also signs of Harpocrates. It has been referred to as the daughter of the Library of Alexandria. The site has been heavily plundered.[1]Contents1 History 2 Excavations2.1 Statues3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The site is located on a rocky plateau, overlooking land and sea.[1] By all detailed accounts, the Serapeum
Serapeum
was the largest and most magnificent of all temples in the Greek quarter of Alexandria
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Antinous
Antinous
Antinous
(also Antinoüs or Antinoös; Ancient Greek: Ἀντίνοος; 27 November, c. 111 – before 30 October 130[1]) was a Bithynian Greek youth and a favourite, or lover, of the Roman emperor Hadrian.[2] He was deified after his death, being worshiped in both the Greek East and Latin West, sometimes as a god (theos) and sometimes merely as a hero (heros).[3] Little is known of Antinous' life, although it is known that he was born in Claudiopolis (present day Bolu, Turkey), in the Roman province of Bithynia. He likely was introduced to Hadrian
Hadrian
in 123, before being taken to Italy for a higher education. He had become the favourite of Hadrian
Hadrian
by 128, when he was taken on a tour of the Empire as part of Hadrian's personal retinue
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Roman Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
was the name of two distinct Roman provinces, the one a short-lived creation of the Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
Trajan
Trajan
in 116–117 and the other established by Emperor Septimius Severus
Septimius Severus
in ca. 198, which ranged between the Roman and the Sassanid empires, until the Muslim conquests of the 7th Century.Contents1 Trajan's province 2 Severus's province2.1 Lucius Verus's campaign 2.2 Year Of The Five Emperors 2.3 Reconquest by Severus 2.4 Warzone3 Reorganisation 4 See also 5 References5.1 SourcesTrajan's province[edit] In 113, Emperor Trajan
Trajan
(r. 98–117) launched a war against Rome's long-time eastern rival, the Parthian Empire. In 114, he conquered Armenia, which was made into a province, and by the end of 115, he had conquered northern Mesopotamia
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Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
(/ɔːˈriːliəs/; Latin: Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
Antoninus Augustus;[6][notes 1][9] 26 April 121 – 17 March 180 AD) was Roman emperor from 161 to 180, ruling jointly with his adoptive brother (and son-in-law), Lucius Verus, until Verus' death in 169 and jointly with his son, Commodus, from 177. He was the last of the so-called Five Good Emperors. He was a practitioner of Stoicism, and his untitled writing, commonly known as Meditations, is a significant source of the modern understanding of ancient Stoic philosophy. It is considered by many commentators to be one of the greatest works of philosophy.[10] During his reign, the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
defeated a revitalized Parthian Empire in the East: Aurelius' general Avidius Cassius sacked the capital Ctesiphon
Ctesiphon
in 164
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Lucius Verus
Lucius Verus
Lucius Verus
(/ˈluʃəs ˈvɪərəs/; Latin: Lucius Aurelius Verus Augustus; 15 December 130 – 23 January 169 AD) was the co-emperor of Rome
Rome
with his adoptive brother Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
from 161 until his own death in 169
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