HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Aram-Naharaim
Aram-Naharaim (Aramaic: ארם נהריים) is a region that is mentioned five times in the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. It is commonly identified with Nahrima mentioned in three tablets of the Amarna
Amarna
correspondence as a geographical description of the kingdom of Mitanni. In Genesis, it is used somewhat interchangeably with the names Paddan Aram and Haran to denote the place where Abraham
Abraham
stayed briefly with his father Terah's family after leaving Ur of the Chaldees, while en route to Canaan
Canaan
(Gen. 11:31), and the place from which later patriarchs obtained wives, rather than marry daughters of Canaan. Paddan Aram refers to the part of Aram-Naharaim along the upper Euphrates, while Haran is mainly identified with the ancient Assyrian city of Harran
Harran
on the Balikh River
[...More...]

"Aram-Naharaim" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aramaic
Aramaic[2] (אַרָמָיָא Arāmāyā, Classical Syriac: ܐܪܡܝܐ‎, Arabic: آرامية‎) is a language or group of languages belonging to the Semitic subfamily of the Afroasiatic language family. More specifically, it is part of the Northwest Semitic group, which also includes the Canaanite languages such as Hebrew and Phoenician. The Aramaic alphabet
Aramaic alphabet
was widely adopted for other languages and is ancestral to the Hebrew, Syriac and Arabic alphabets. During its approximately 3,100 years of written history,[3] Aramaic has served variously as a language of administration of empires and as a language of divine worship, religious study and as the spoken tongue of a number of Semitic peoples from the Near East. Historically, Aramaic was the language of Aramean tribes, a Semitic people of the region around between the Levant
Levant
and the northern Euphrates
Euphrates
valley
[...More...]

"Aramaic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Josephus
Titus
Titus
Flavius Josephus
Josephus
(/dʒoʊˈsiːfəs/;[1] Greek: Φλάβιος Ἰώσηπος; 37 – c. 100),[2][page needed] born Yosef ben Matityahu (Hebrew: יוסף הכהן בן מתתיהו‬, Yosef ben Matityahu; Greek: Ἰώσηπος Ματθίου παῖς),[3][4] was a first-century Romano-Jewish scholar, historian and hagiographer, who was born in Jerusalem—then part of Roman Judea—to a father of priestly descent and a mother who claimed royal ancestry. He initially fought against the Romans during the First Jewish–Roman War as head of Jewish forces in Galilee, until surrendering in 67 CE to Roman forces led by Vespasian
Vespasian
after the six-week siege of Jotapata. Josephus
Josephus
claimed the Jewish Messianic prophecies that initiated the First Roman-Jewish War made reference to Vespasian
Vespasian
becoming Emperor of Rome
[...More...]

"Josephus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
[...More...]

"Wayback Machine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Joshua
Joshua
Joshua
(/ˈdʒɒʃuə/) or Jehoshua (Hebrew: יְהוֹשֻׁעַ‬ Yehōšuʿa)[a] is the central figure in the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible's Book of Joshua. According to the books of Exodus, Numbers and Joshua, he was Moses' assistant and became the leader of the Israelite
Israelite
tribes after the death of Moses.[3] His name was Hoshe'a (הוֹשֵׁעַ) the son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim, but Moses
Moses
called him Joshua
Joshua
(Numbers 13:16), the name by which he is commonly known. The name is shortened to Yeshua in Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8:17)
[...More...]

"Joshua" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Onkelos
Onkelos (Hebrew: אונקלוס‬), possibly identical to Aquila of Sinope, was a Roman national who converted to Judaism
Judaism
in Tannaic times (c. 35–120 CE). He is considered to be the author of the famous Targum Onkelos
Targum Onkelos
(c. 110 CE).Contents1 Onkelos in the Talmud 2 The Targum
Targum
of Onkelos 3 References 4 See also 5 External links Onkelos in the Talmud[edit] Onkelos is mentioned several times in the Talmud. According to the traditional Jewish sources, he was a prominent Roman nobleman, a nephew of the Roman emperor
Roman emperor
Titus. According to the midrash Tanhuma[1] he was a nephew of Hadrian, and not Titus
[...More...]

"Onkelos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jonathan Ben Uzziel
Jonathan ben Uzziel
Jonathan ben Uzziel
(Hebrew: יונתן בן עוזיאל‬) was one of the 80 tannaim who studied under Hillel the Elder
Hillel the Elder
during the time of Roman-ruled Judea. He is the author of Targum Jonathan and a book of kabbalah known as Megadnim. Jonathan ben Uzziel
Jonathan ben Uzziel
is mentioned in the Talmud
Talmud
(Sukkah 28a, Bava Batra 133b). According to Zev Vilnai, Rabbi Shmuel ben Shimshon wrote about the tomb in 1210: "There is a large tree next to it, and the Ishmaelites [Arabs] bring oil and light a candle in his honor and make vows in his honor." An illustration of Yonatan ben Uzziel's tomb appears in "Ancestry of fathers and prophets" (Hebrew: יחוס אבות ונביאים), a book printed in 1537. The tomb of ben Uzziel is located in Amuka, Galilee
Galilee
near Safed, Israel
[...More...]

"Jonathan Ben Uzziel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arpachshad
Arpachshad,[a], alternatively spelled Arphaxad or Arphacsad, was one of the five sons of Shem, the eldest son of Noah
Noah
(Genesis 10:22, 24; 11:10-13; 1 Chron. 1:17-18). Arpachshad's brothers were Elam, Asshur, Lud and Aram; he is an ancestor of Abraham. He is said by Gen. 11:10 to have been born two years after the Flood, when Shem
Shem
was 100. Arpachshad's son is called Shelah, except in the Septuagint, where his son is Cainan (קינן‬), Shelah being Arpachshad's grandson. Cainan is also identified as Arpachshad's son in Luke 3:36 and Jubilees
Jubilees
8:1. The Book of Jubilees
Jubilees
additionally identifies Arpachshad's wife as Rasu'aya, the daughter of Susan, who was the son (or daughter in some versions) of Shem's older son Elam
[...More...]

"Arpachshad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edessa, Mesopotamia
Edessa
Edessa
(Ancient Greek: Ἔδεσσα; Arabic: الرها‎; Turkish: Şanlıurfa; Kurdish: Riha‎) was a city in Upper Mesopotamia, founded on an earlier site by Seleucus I Nicator
Seleucus I Nicator
ca. 302 BC. It was also known as Antiochia on the Callirhoe from the 2nd century BC. It was the capital of the semi-independent kingdom of Osroene
Osroene
from c. 132 BC and fell under direct Roman rule in ca. 242. It became an important early centre of Syriac Christianity. It fell to the Muslim conquest in 639, was briefly re-taken by Byzantium
Byzantium
in 1031, and became the center of the Crusader state
Crusader state
of the County of Edessa
County of Edessa
during 1098–1144
[...More...]

"Edessa, Mesopotamia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Armenia
Coordinates: 40°N 45°E / 40°N 45°E / 40; 45 Armenia
Armenia
(/ɑːrˈmiːniə/ ( listen);[20] Armenian: Հայաստան, translit. Hayastan, IPA: [hɑjɑsˈtɑn]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Armenia
Armenia
(Armenian: Հայաստանի Հանրապետություն, translit. Hayastani Hanrapetut'yun, IPA: [hɑjɑstɑˈni hɑnɾɑpɛtutʰˈjun]), is a country in the South Caucasus
South Caucasus
region of Eurasia
[...More...]

"Armenia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Book Of Jubilees
The Book
Book
of Jubilees, sometimes called Lesser Genesis (Leptogenesis), is an ancient Jewish
Jewish
religious work of 50 chapters, considered canonical by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church
Ethiopian Orthodox Church
as well as Beta Israel (Ethiopian Jews), where it is known as the Book
Book
of Division (Ge'ez: መጽሃፈ ኩፋሌ Mets'hafe Kufale). Jubilees is considered one of the pseudepigrapha by Protestant, Roman Catholic, and Eastern Orthodox Churches.[1] It was well known to Early Christians, as evidenced by the writings of Epiphanius, Justin Martyr, Origen, Diodorus of Tarsus, Isidore of Alexandria, Isidore of Seville, Eutychius of Alexandria, John Malalas, George Syncellus, and George Kedrenos
[...More...]

"Book Of Jubilees" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tigris
The Tigris
Tigris
(/ˈtaɪɡrɪs/; Sumerian: 𒁇𒄘𒃼 Idigna or Idigina; Akkadian: 𒁇𒄘𒃼 Idiqlat; Arabic: دجلة‎ Dijlah [didʒlah]; Syriac: ܕܹܩܠܵܬ‎ Deqlaṯ; Armenian: Տիգրիս Tigris; Դգլաթ Dglatʿ; Hebrew: Ḥîddeqel חידקל‎, biblical Hiddekel; Turkish: Dicle; Kurdish: Dîcle, Dîjla دیجلە‎) is the eastern member of the two great rivers that define Mesopotamia, the other being the Euphrates
[...More...]

"Tigris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tanakh
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Tanakh
Tanakh
(/tɑːˈnɑːx/;[1] תַּנַ"ךְ, pronounced [taˈnaχ] or [təˈnax]; also Tenakh, Tenak, Tanach), also called the Mikra or Hebrew Bible, is the canonical collection of Jewish texts, which is also a textual source for the Christian
Christian
Old Testament. These texts are composed mainly in Biblical Hebrew, with some passages in Biblical Aramaic (in the books of Daniel, Ezra and a few others). The traditional Hebrew text is known as the Masoretic Text
[...More...]

"Tanakh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Septuagint
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eFragment of a Septuagint: A column of uncial book from 1 Esdras
1 Esdras
in the Codex Vaticanus
Codex Vaticanus
c. 325–350 CE, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brenton's Greek edition and English translation.The Septuagint
Septuagint
(from the Latin
Latin
septuaginta, "seventy"), also known as the LXX, is a Koine Greek
Koine Greek
translation of a Hebraic textual tradition that included certain texts which were later included in the canonical Hebrew Bible
Bible
and other related texts which were not. As the primary Greek translation of the Old Testament, it is also called the Greek Old Testament
[...More...]

"Septuagint" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Balikh River
The Balikh River
River
(Arabic: نهر البليخ‎) is a perennial river that originates in the spring of 'Ayn al-'Arus in Syria. It flows due south and joins the Euphrates
Euphrates
at the modern town of Raqqa. After the Khabur River, the Balikh is the largest tributary to the Euphrates
Euphrates
on Syrian soil. It is an important source of water and large parts have recently been subjected to canalization.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Archaeological research in the Balikh River
River
basin 2.2 Excavated archaeological sites in the Balikh River
River
basin3 References 4 External linksGeography[edit] The primary source of the Balikh River
River
is the karstic spring of 'Ayn al-'Arus, just south of the Syro-Turkish border
[...More...]

"Balikh River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.