HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Arabic Languages
The Arabic language
Arabic language
family consists of all of the descendants of Proto-Arabic, including:Old Arabic, the language of northwestern Arabia in the pre-Islamic period and its varieties:Northern Old Arabic
Old Arabic
(including Safaitic and Hismaic)Nabataean ArabicOld HejaziClassical Arabic, the liturgical language of Islam which emerged in the 7th century AD, Neo-Arabic, the descendants of spoken Old Arabic, including:Maltese Colloquial ArabicWestern Arabic Eastern ArabicModern Standard Arabic, the standardized variety of Arabic used since the 19th century and modernized version of the liturgical language of IslamSee also[edit]Arab (other) Arab (etymology)Notes[edit]^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Arabian". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
[...More...]

"Arabic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

North Africa
North Africa
Africa
is a collective term for a group of Mediterranean countries situated in the northern-most region of the African continent. The term "North Africa" has no single accepted definition. It is sometimes defined as stretching from the Atlantic
Atlantic
shores of Morocco
Morocco
in the west, to the Suez Canal
Suez Canal
and the Red Sea
Red Sea
in the east. Others have limited it to the countries of Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, a region known by the French during colonial times as “Afrique du Nord” and by the Arabs
Arabs
as the Maghreb
Maghreb
(“West”). The most commonly accepted definition includes Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, as well as Libya
Libya
and Egypt
[...More...]

"North Africa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Arab (etymology)
The proper name Arab or Arabian (and cognates in other languages) has been used to translate several different but similar-sounding words in ancient and classical texts which do not necessarily have the same meaning or origin. The etymology of the term is of course closely linked to that of the place name Arabia. Gustave E. von Grunebaum, in his book Classical Islam said that an approximate translation is passerby or nomad.[1]Contents1 Semitic etymology 2 In Arabic 3 In Assyrian 4 In Hebrew 5 Notes 6 ReferencesSemitic etymology[edit] The root of the word has many meanings in Semitic languages including desert, nomad, merchant, raven and comprehensible with all of these having varying degrees of relevance to the emergence of the name
[...More...]

"Arab (etymology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Western Neo-Aramaic
Western Neo-Aramaic
Western Neo-Aramaic
is a modern Aramaic language. Today, it is spoken in three villages in the Anti-Lebanon Mountains
Anti-Lebanon Mountains
of western Syria.[4] Western Neo-Aramaic
Western Neo-Aramaic
is the only living language among the Western Aramaic languages
[...More...]

"Western Neo-Aramaic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Western Aramaic Languages
Western
Western
may refer to:Contents1 Common uses and meanings 2 Places 3 Art, entertainment, and media 4 Brands and enterprises 5 Educational institutions 6 Sport 7 Transportation 8 People with the surname 9 Other uses 10 See alsoCommon uses and meanings[edit]West, a point in direction Western
Western
(genre), a category of fiction and visual art centered on the American Old West Western
Western
fiction, the Western
Western
genre as featured in literature Western
Western
music (North America), a type of American folk music Western
Western
world, e.g
[...More...]

"Western Aramaic Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Edomite Language
The Edomite language was a Canaanite language, very similar to Hebrew, spoken by the Edomites
Edomites
in southwestern Jordan
Jordan
and parts of Israel
Israel
in the first millennium BC. It is known only from a very small corpus. In early times, it seems to have been written with a Phoenician alphabet; like the Moabite language, it retained feminine -t. However, in the 6th century BC, it adopted the Aramaic alphabet
[...More...]

"Edomite Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ammonite Language
Ammonite is the extinct Canaanite language of the Ammonite people mentioned in the Bible, who used to live in modern-day Jordan, and after whom its capital Amman
Amman
is named. Only fragments of their language survive - chiefly the 9th century BC Amman
Amman
Citadel Inscription,[2] the 7th-6th century BC Tell Siran bronze bottle, and a few ostraca. As far as can be determined from the small corpus, it was extremely similar to Biblical Hebrew, with some possible Aramaic influence including the use of the verb ‘bd (עבד) instead of the more common Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew
‘śh (עשה) for "make"
[...More...]

"Ammonite Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mizrahi Hebrew
Mizrahi Hebrew, or Eastern Hebrew, refers to any of the pronunciation systems for Biblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew
used liturgically by Mizrahi Jews, that is, Jews
Jews
from Arab countries or further east and with a background of Arabic, Persian, or other languages of the Middle East
Middle East
and Asia. As such, Mizrahi Hebrew is actually a blanket term for many dialects. Sephardi Hebrew is not considered one of these even if it has been spoken in the Middle East
Middle East
and North Africa. The Sephardim were expellees from Spain, and settled among the Mizrahim, but in countries such as Syria and Morocco, there was a fairly high degree of convergence between the Sephardi and the local pronunciations of Hebrew
[...More...]

"Mizrahi Hebrew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Middle East
The Middle East[note 1] is a transcontinental region centered on Western Asia, Turkey
Turkey
(both Asian and European), and Egypt
Egypt
(which is mostly in North Africa). The corresponding adjective is Middle Eastern and the derived noun is Middle Easterner. The term has come into wider usage as a replacement of the term Near East
Near East
(as opposed to the Far East) beginning in the early 20th century. Arabs, Turks, Persians, Kurds, and Azeris (excluding Azerbaijan) constitute the largest ethnic groups in the region by population.[2] Minorities of the Middle East
Middle East
include Jews, Baloch, Greeks, Assyrians, and other Arameans, Berbers, Circassians
Circassians
(including Kabardians), Copts, Druze, Lurs, Mandaeans, Samaritans, Shabaks, Tats, and Zazas. In the Middle East, there is also a Romani community
[...More...]

"Middle East" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eblaite Language
Language
Language
is a system that consists of the development, acquisition, maintenance and use of complex systems of communication, particularly the human ability to do so; and a language is any specific example of such a system. The scientific study of language is called linguistics. Questions concerning the philosophy of language, such as whether words can represent experience, have been debated at least since Gorgias
Gorgias
and Plato
Plato
in ancient Greece. Thinkers such as Rousseau
Rousseau
have argued that language originated from emotions while others like Kant have held that it originated from rational and logical thought. 20th-century philosophers such as Wittgenstein argued that philosophy is really the study of language. Major figures in linguistics include Ferdinand de Saussure and Noam Chomsky. Estimates of the number of human languages in the world vary between 5,000 and 7,000
[...More...]

"Eblaite Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Proto-Arabic
Proto-Arabic is the name given to the hypothetical reconstructed ancestor of all the varieties of Arabic attested since the 9th century BC. There are two lines of evidence to reconstruct proto-Arabic:Evidence of Arabic becomes more frequent in the 2nd century BC, with the documentation of Arabic names in the Nabataean
Nabataean
script as well as evidence of an Arabic substratum in the Nabataean
Nabataean
language.The Safaitic
Safaitic
and Hismaic inscriptions were composed between the 1st century BC and the 4th century AD, in the basalt desert of northwest Arabia and the southern Levant. They also are crucial to the reconstruction of Proto-Arabic since they show many features that are shared by epigraphic Old South Arabian
Old South Arabian
and Classical Arabic
[...More...]

"Proto-Arabic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Malta
Coordinates: 35°53′N 14°30′E / 35.883°N 14.500°E / 35.883; 14.500 Malta
Malta
(/ˈmɒltə, ˈmɔːl-/ ( listen); Maltese: [ˈmɐltɐ]), officially known as the Republic of Malta (Maltese: Repubblika ta' Malta), is a Southern European island country consisting of an archipelago in the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea.[10] It lies 80 km (50 mi) south of Italy, 284 km (176 mi) east of Tunisia,[11] and 333 km (207 mi) north of Libya.[12] The country covers just over 316 km2 (122 sq mi),[4] with a population of just under 450,000,[5] making it one of the world's smallest[13][14][15] and most densely populated countries
[...More...]

"Malta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Language Family
A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestral language or parental language, called the proto-language of that family. The term "family" reflects the tree model of language origination in historical linguistics, which makes use of a metaphor comparing languages to people in a biological family tree, or in a subsequent modification, to species in a phylogenetic tree of evolutionary taxonomy. Linguists therefore describe the daughter languages within a language family as being genetically related.[1] According to Ethnologue
Ethnologue
the 7,099 living human languages are distributed in 141 different language families.[2] A "living language" is simply one that is used as the primary form of communication of a group of people
[...More...]

"Language Family" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Glottolog
Glottolog
Glottolog
is a bibliographic database of the world's lesser-known languages, developed and maintained first at the former Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and since 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Glottolog
Glottolog
provides a catalogue of the world's languages and language families, and a bibliography on the world's less-spoken languages
[...More...]

"Glottolog" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.