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Apollo Program
The Apollo
Apollo
program, also known as Project Apollo, was the third United States human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which accomplished landing the first humans on the Moon
Moon
from 1969 to 1972. First conceived during Dwight D
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Project Vanguard
Project Vanguard
Project Vanguard
was a program managed by the United States
United States
Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), which intended to launch the first artificial satellite into Earth
Earth
orbit using a Vanguard rocket[1] as the launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral Missile Annex, Florida. In response to the surprise launch of Sputnik 1
Sputnik 1
on October 4, 1957, the U.S. restarted the Explorer program, which had been proposed earlier by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency
Army Ballistic Missile Agency
(ABMA). Privately, however, the CIA and President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D

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Titan (rocket Family)
Titan is a family of United States expendable rockets used between 1959 and 2005. A total of 368 rockets of this family were launched, including all the Project Gemini
Project Gemini
manned flights of the mid-1960s. Titans were part of the US Air Force's intercontinental ballistic missile fleet until 1987, and lifted other American military payloads as well as civilian agency intelligence-gathering satellites. Titans also were used to send highly successful interplanetary scientific probes throughout the Solar System.Contents1 Titan I 2 Titan II 3 Titan III 4 Titan IV 5 Titan V 6 Rocket
Rocket
fuel 7 Accidents at Titan II silos 8 Retirement 9 Specifications 10 See also 11 Notes 12 References 13 External linksTitan I[edit] Main article: HGM-25A Titan I The HGM-25A Titan I
Titan I
was the first version of the Titan family of rockets
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Juno I
The Juno I
Juno I
was a four-stage American booster rocket which launched America's first satellite, Explorer 1, in 1958. A member of the Redstone rocket family, it was derived from the Jupiter-C
Jupiter-C
sounding rocket. It is commonly confused with the Juno II
Juno II
launch vehicle, which was derived from the PGM-19 Jupiter
PGM-19 Jupiter
medium-range ballistic missile.Contents1 Development 2 History 3 Gallery 4 ReferencesDevelopment[edit] The Juno I
Juno I
consisted of a Jupiter-C
Jupiter-C
rocket with a fourth stage mounted on top of the "tub" of the third stage, and fired after third-stage burnout to boost the payload and fourth stage to an orbital velocity of 8 kilometres per second (29,000 km/h; 18,000 mph)
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Lander (spacecraft)
A lander is a spacecraft which descends toward and comes to rest on the surface of an astronomical body.[1] By contrast with an impact probe, which makes a hard landing and is damaged or destroyed so ceases to function after reaching the surface, a lander makes a soft landing after which the probe remains functional. For bodies with atmospheres, the landing occurs after atmospheric entry. In these cases, landers may employ parachutes to slow down and to maintain a low terminal velocity. Sometimes small landing rockets are fired just before impact to reduce the impact velocity. Landing may be accomplished by controlled descent and setdown on landing gear, with the possible addition of a post-landing attachment mechanism for celestial bodies with low gravity
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Vanguard (rocket)
The Vanguard rocket[2] was intended to be the first launch vehicle the United States would use to place a satellite into orbit. Instead, the Sputnik crisis
Sputnik crisis
caused by the surprise launch of Sputnik 1
Sputnik 1
led the U.S., after the failure of Vanguard TV3, to quickly orbit the Explorer 1 satellite using a Juno I
Juno I
rocket, making Vanguard I
Vanguard I
the second successful U.S. orbital launch. Vanguard rockets were used by Project Vanguard
Project Vanguard
from 1957 to 1959. Of the eleven Vanguard rockets which the project attempted to launch, three successfully placed satellites into orbit
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New Horizons
New Frontiers programJuno → New Horizons
New Horizons
is an interplanetary space probe that was launched as a part of NASA's New Frontiers program.[2] Engineered by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), with a team led by S
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Expendable Launch Vehicle
An expendable launch vehicle (ELV) is a launch system or launch vehicle stage that is used only once to carry a payload into space. Historically, satellites and human spacecraft are launched mainly using expendable launchers. Their components are not recovered. This contrasts with a reusable launch system or RLV, in which some or all of the components are recovered intact. The vehicle typically consists of several rocket stages, discarded one by one as the vehicle gains altitude and speed. A few companies are developing reusable launch systems intended to cut costs. A reusable launch vehicle, such as the SpaceX
SpaceX
Falcon 9 first-stage booster, may be flown in "expendable configuration" to increase performance, although this is unusual. The now-retired Space Shuttle was one of the earliest RLVs, and was intended to greatly reduce launch costs
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Explorer 1
Explorer 1
Explorer 1
was the first satellite of the United States, launched as part of its participation in the International Geophysical Year. The mission followed the first two satellites the previous year; the Soviet Union's Sputnik 1
Sputnik 1
and 2, beginning the Cold War
Cold War
Space Race between the two nations. Explorer 1
Explorer 1
was launched on January 31, 1958 at 22:48 Eastern Time (February 1, 03:48 UTC) atop the first Juno booster from LC-26 at the Cape Canaveral Missile Annex, Florida. It was the first spacecraft to detect the Van Allen radiation belt,[2] returning data until its batteries were exhausted after nearly four months
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Atlas-Agena
The Atlas-Agena
Atlas-Agena
was an American expendable launch system derived from the SM-65 Atlas
SM-65 Atlas
missile. It was a member of the Atlas family of rockets, and was launched 109 times between 1960 and 1978.[1] It was used to launch the first five Mariner unmanned probes to the planets Venus
Venus
and Mars, and the Ranger and Lunar Orbiter unmanned probes to the Moon. The upper stage was also used as an unmanned orbital target vehicle for the Gemini manned spacecraft to practice rendezvous and docking. However, the launch vehicle family was originally developed for the Air Force and most of its launches were classified DoD payloads. The Atlas-Agena
Atlas-Agena
was a two-and-a-half-stage rocket, with a stage-and-a-half Atlas missile as the first stage, and an RM-81 Agena second stage
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Titan II GLV
The Titan II GLV
Titan II GLV
(Gemini Launch Vehicle) or Gemini-Titan II was an American expendable launch system derived from the Titan II missile, which was used to launch twelve Gemini missions for NASA
NASA
between 1964 and 1966. Two unmanned launches followed by ten manned ones were conducted from Launch Complex 19 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, starting with Gemini 1
Gemini 1
on April 8, 1964. The Titan II was a two-stage liquid-fuel rocket, using a hypergolic propellant combination of Aerozine 50 fuel and nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer
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Atlas LV-3B
The Atlas LV-3B, Atlas D Mercury Launch Vehicle or Mercury-Atlas Launch Vehicle, was a human-rated expendable launch system used as part of the United States Project Mercury
Project Mercury
to send astronauts into low Earth orbit. Manufactured by American aircraft manufacturing company Convair, it was derived from the SM-65D Atlas
SM-65D Atlas
missile, and was a member of the Atlas family of rockets. The Atlas D missile was the natural choice for Project Mercury
Project Mercury
since it was the only launch vehicle in the US arsenal that could put the spacecraft into orbit and also had a large number of flights to gather data from
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Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
(LRO) is a NASA
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Mariner Program
The Mariner program
Mariner program
was a 10-mission program conducted by the American space agency NASA
NASA
in conjunction with Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).[1] The program launched a series of robotic interplanetary probes, from 1962 to 1973, designed to investigate Mars, Venus
Venus
and Mercury.[2] The program included a number of firsts, including the first planetary flyby, the first planetary orbiter, and the first gravity assist maneuver. Of the ten vehicles in the Mariner series, seven were successful, forming the starting point for many subsequent NASA/JPL space probe programs. The planned Mariner Jupiter-Saturn vehicles were adapted into the Voyager program,[3] while the Viking program
Viking program
orbiters were enlarged versions of the Mariner 9
Mariner 9
spacecraft
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International Space Station
The International Space Station
International Space Station
(ISS) is a space station, or a habitable artificial satellite, in low Earth
Earth
orbit. Its first component launched into orbit in 1998, the last pressurised module was fitted in 2011, and the station is expected to be used until 2028. Development and assembly of the station continues, with components scheduled for launch in 2018 and 2019. The ISS is the largest human-made body in low Earth
Earth
orbit and can often be seen with the naked eye from Earth.[8][9] The ISS consists of pressurised modules, external trusses, solar arrays, and other components
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Voyager Program
The Voyager program
Voyager program
is an American scientific program that employs two robotic probes, Voyager 1
Voyager 1
and Voyager 2, to study the outer Solar System.[1] The probes were launched in 1977 to take advantage of a favorable alignment of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus
Uranus
and Neptune. Although their original mission was to study only the planetary systems of Jupiter
Jupiter
and Saturn, Voyager 2
Voyager 2
continued on to Uranus
Uranus
and Neptune. The Voyagers now explore the outer boundary of the heliosphere in interstellar space; their mission has been extended three times and they continue to transmit useful scientific data
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