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Antoinette (manufacturer)
Antoinette was a French manufacturer of light petrol engines. Antoinette also became a pioneer-era builder of aeroplanes before World War I, most notably the record-breaking monoplanes flown by Hubert Latham
Hubert Latham
and René Labouchère. Based in Puteaux, the Antoinette concern was in operation between 1903 and 1912. The company operated a flying school at Chalons for which it built one of the earliest flight simulators.Contents1 Private engine-building venture 2 Antoinette incorporates 3 Aircraft manufacture3.1 Flying school at Châlons 3.2 Aircraft promotion with Latham 3.3 Aircraft built by Antoinette4 Turbulent times and the end of Antoinette 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksPrivate engine-building venture[edit] Antoinette began as a private venture led by the engineer Léon Levavasseur and financed by Jules Gastambide, who owned an electricity generating station in Algeria
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Grande Semaine D'Aviation De La Champagne
The Grande Semaine d'Aviation de la Champagne
Champagne
was an aviation meet held near Reims
Reims
in France
France
during August 1909. It was the first international public flying event and was seen both at the time[1] and by later historians[2] as marking the coming of age of heavier-than-air aviation
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Automobile
A car (or automobile) is a wheeled motor vehicle used for transportation. Most definitions of car say they run primarily on roads, seat one to eight people, have four tires, and mainly transport people rather than goods.[2][3] Cars came into global use during the 20th century, and developed economies depend on them. The year 1886 is regarded as the birth year of the modern car when German inventor Karl Benz built his Benz Patent-Motorwagen. Cars became widely available in the early 20th century. One of the first cars that were accessible to the masses was the 1908 Model T, an American car manufactured by the Ford
Ford
Motor Company. Cars were rapidly adopted in the US, where they replaced animal-drawn carriages and carts, but took much longer to be accepted in Western Europe and other parts of the world. Cars have controls for driving, parking, passenger comfort and safety, and controlling a variety of lights
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French Army
The French Army, officially the Ground Army
Army
(French: Armée de terre [aʀme də tɛʀ]) (to distinguish it from the French Air Force, Armée de L'air or Air Army) is the land-based and largest component of the French Armed Forces. It is responsible to the Government of France, along with the other four components of the Armed Forces. The current Chief of Staff of the French Army
Chief of Staff of the French Army
(CEMAT) is General Jean-Pierre Bosser, a direct subordinate of the Chief of the Defence Staff (CEMA). General Bosser is also responsible, in part, to the Ministry of the Armed Forces for organization, preparation, use of forces, as well as planning and programming, equipment and Army
Army
future acquisitions
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Antoinette IV
Antoinette is a French given name, the feminine form of Antoine
Antoine
(from Latin Antonius), meaning beyond praise or highly praiseworthy.Contents1 People with the name1.1 Nobles 1.2 Other people2 See alsoPeople with the name[edit] Nobles[edit]
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Steam Cooling
Radiators are heat exchangers used for cooling internal combustion engines, mainly in automobiles but also in piston-engined aircraft, railway locomotives, motorcycles, stationary generating plant or any similar use of such an engine. Internal combustion engines are often cooled by circulating a liquid called engine coolant around the engine block, where it is heated, then through a radiator where it loses heat to the atmosphere, and then returned to the engine. Engine coolant is usually water-based, but may also be oil
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Belmont Park
Belmont Park
Belmont Park
is a major Thoroughbred
Thoroughbred
horse-racing facility located in Elmont, New York, just outside New York City
New York City
limits. It first opened on May 4, 1905
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Antoinette VII
Antoinette is a French given name, the feminine form of Antoine
Antoine
(from Latin Antonius), meaning beyond praise or highly praiseworthy.Contents1 People with the name1.1 Nobles 1.2 Other people2 See alsoPeople with the name[edit] Nobles[edit]
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Radiator (engine Cooling)
Radiators are heat exchangers used for cooling internal combustion engines, mainly in automobiles but also in piston-engined aircraft, railway locomotives, motorcycles, stationary generating plant or any similar use of such an engine. Internal combustion engines are often cooled by circulating a liquid called engine coolant around the engine block, where it is heated, then through a radiator where it loses heat to the atmosphere, and then returned to the engine. Engine
Engine
coolant is usually water-based, but may also be oil
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Air Ambulance
Air medical services
Air medical services
is a comprehensive term covering the use of air transportation, airplane or helicopter, to move patients to and from healthcare facilities and accident scenes. Personnel provide comprehensive prehospital and emergency and critical care to all types of patients during aeromedical evacuation or rescue operations aboard helicopter and propeller aircraft or jet aircraft. The use of air transport of patients dates to World War I, but its role was expanded dramatically during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts
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Henri Farman
Henri Farman
Henri Farman
(26 May 1874 – 17 July 1958)[1] was an Anglo-French aviator and aircraft designer and manufacturer with his brother Maurice Farman. His family was British and he took French nationality in 1937.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 Notes and references 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Paris, France, and given the name Henry, he was the son of a well-to-do British newspaper correspondent working there and his French wife. Farman trained as a painter at the École des Beaux Arts, but quickly become obsessed with the new mechanical inventions that were rapidly appearing at the end of the 19th century. Since his family had money, he was able to pursue this interest as an amateur sportsman
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Biplane
A biplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with two main wings stacked one above the other. The first powered, controlled aeroplane to fly, the Wright Flyer, used a biplane wing arrangement, as did many aircraft in the early years of aviation. While a biplane wing structure has a structural advantage over a monoplane, it produces more drag than a similar unbraced or cantilever monoplane wing. Improved structural techniques, better materials and the quest for greater speed made the biplane configuration obsolete for most purposes by the late 1930s. Biplanes offer several advantages over conventional cantilever monoplane designs: they permit lighter wing structures, low wing loading and smaller span for a given wing area
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Reims, France
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Reims
Reims
(/riːmz/; also spelled Rheims; French: [ʁɛ̃s]), a city in the Grand Est
Grand Est
region of France, lies 129 km (80 mi) east-northeast of Paris. The 2013 census recorded 182,592 inhabitants (Rémoises (feminine) and Rémois (masculine)) in the city of Reims proper (the commune), and 317,611 inhabitants in the metropolitan area (aire urbaine). Its river, the Vesle, is a tributary of the Aisne. Founded by the Gauls, it became a major city during the period of the Roman Empire.[1] Reims
Reims
played a prominent ceremonial role in French monarchical history as the traditional site of the crowning of the kings of France
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Infante Alfonso, Duke Of Galliera
Alfonso de Orleans y Borbón, Infante
Infante
of Spain, Duke of Galliera
Duke of Galliera
(12 November 1886 
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English Channel
The English Channel
English Channel
(French: la Manche, "The Sleeve"; German: Ärmelkanal, "Sleeve Channel"; Breton: Mor Breizh, "Sea of Brittany"; Cornish: Mor Bretannek, "British Sea"), also called simply the Channel, is the body of water that separates southern England
England
from northern France, and links the southern part of the North Sea
North Sea
to the Atlantic Ocean
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Paris Motor Show
The Paris
Paris
Motor Show (French: Mondial de l'Automobile) is a biennial auto show in Paris. Held during October, it is one of the most important auto shows,[1] often with many new production automobile and concept car debuts. The show presently takes place in Paris
Paris
expo Porte de Versailles. The Mondial is scheduled by the Organisation Internationale des Constructeurs d'Automobiles, which considers it a major international auto show. In 2014, the Paris
Paris
Motor Show welcomed 1,253,513 visitors, making it the most visited auto show in the world, ahead of Tokyo and Frankfurt. Until 1986, it was called the Salon de l'Automobile; it took the name Mondial de l'Automobile in 1988
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