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Antigonid Dynasty
The Antigonid dynasty
Antigonid dynasty
(/ænˈtɪɡoʊnɪd/; Greek: Ἀντιγονίδαι) was a dynasty of Hellenistic
Hellenistic
kings descended from Alexander the Great's general Antigonus I Monophthalmus
Antigonus I Monophthalmus
("the One-eyed").Contents1 History 2 Legacy 3 Dynasty 4 Coin gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingHistory[edit] Further information: Argead dynasty Further information: History of Macedonia (ancient kingdom)
History of Macedonia (ancient kingdom)
and Government of Macedonia (ancient kingdom) Succeeding the Antipatrid dynasty
Antipatrid dynasty
in much of Macedonia, Antigonus ruled mostly over Asia Minor and northern Syria. His attempts to take control of the whole of Alexander's empire led to his defeat and death at the Battle of Ipsus
Battle of Ipsus
in 301 BC
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Ancient Greek Religion
Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
religion encompasses the collection of beliefs, rituals, and mythology originating in ancient Greece in the form of both popular public religion and cult practices
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Alexander Of Corinth
Alexander (died 247 BC) was a Macedonian governor and tyrant of Corinth. He was the son of Craterus who had faithfully governed Corinth
Corinth
and Chalcis
Chalcis
for his half-brother Antigonus II Gonatas. His grandmother was Phila, the celebrated daughter of Antipater and first wife of Demetrius Poliorcetes. According to a note in Livy (XXXV, 26), his mother's name may have been Nicaea and this was also the name of his wife. At his father's death around 263 Alexander inherited his position, which went then far beyond that of a mere Macedonian garrison commander and resembled more a dynastic regency in Greece
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Olympias II Of Epirus
Olympias
Olympias
(in Greek Ὀλυμπιάς, pronounced [olympiás]; lived 3rd century BC) was daughter of Pyrrhus, king of Epirus
Epirus
from his first wife Antigone. She was the wife of her own paternal half-brother Alexander II. After his death she assumed the regency of the kingdom on behalf of her two sons, Pyrrhus II and Ptolemy; and in order to strengthen herself against the Aetolian League
Aetolian League
she gave before 239 BC her daughter Phthia in marriage to Demetrius II, king of Macedonia. By this alliance she secured herself in the possession of the sovereignty, which she continued to administer till her sons were grown up to manhood, when she resigned it into the hands of Pyrrhus II
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Alexander II Of Epirus
Alexander II was a king of Epirus, and the son of Pyrrhus and Lanassa, the daughter of the Sicilian tyrant Agathocles.[1]Contents1 Reign 2 Relations with India 3 References 4 SourcesReign[edit] He succeeded his father as king in 272 BC, and continued the war which his father had begun with Antigonus II Gonatas, whom he succeeded in driving from the kingdom of Macedon. He was, however, dispossessed of both Macedon
Macedon
and Epirus by Demetrius II of Macedon, the son of Antigonus II; upon which he took refuge amongst the Acarnanians. By their assistance and that of his own subjects, who entertained a great attachment for him, he recovered Epirus. It appears that he was in alliance with the Aetolians.[2] Alexander married his paternal half-sister Olympias, by whom he had two sons, Pyrrhus, Ptolemy and a daughter, Phthia
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Phthia Of Epirus
Phthia (in Greek Φθία; lived 4th century BC), was a Greek queen, daughter of Menon of Pharsalus, the Thessalian hipparch, and wife of Aeacides, king of Epirus, by whom she became the mother of the celebrated Pyrrhus, as well as of two daughters: Deidamia, the wife of Demetrius Poliorcetes, and Troias, of whom nothing more is known.[1] Her portrait is found on some of the coins of her son Pyrrhus. References[edit]Smith, William (editor); Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, "Phthia (1)", Boston, (1867)Notes[edit]^ Plutarch, Parallel Lives, "Pyrrhus", 1 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Smith, William, ed. (1870)
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Nicaea Of Corinth
Nicaea was wife of Alexander, tyrant of Corinth
Corinth
and governor of Euboea during the reign of Antigonus Gonatas. After the death of her husband, who was thought to have been poisoned by the command of Gonatas, Nicaea retained possession of the important fortress of Corinth: but Antigonus lulled her into security by offering her the hand of his son Demetrius in marriage, and took the opportunity during the nuptial festivities to surprise the citadel. She is probably the same person mentioned in the Suda
Suda
(s.v. Euphorion) as patronising the poet Euphorion of Chalcis, though the compiler calls her husband only ruler of Euboea. References[edit]  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Smith, William, ed. (1870). "article name needed"
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Stratonice Of Macedon
Stratonice (Greek: Στρατονίκη; lived in the 3rd century BC) of Macedonia was the daughter of Stratonice of Syria
Stratonice of Syria
and of the Seleucid king Antiochus I Soter
Antiochus I Soter
(281–261 BC). She was married to Demetrius II (239–229 BC), king of Macedonia.[1] Stratonice bore Demetrius II, a daughter called Apama.[2] The period of their marriage is unknown; but she appears to have remained in Macedonia until about 239 BC, when she left Demetrius in disgust, on account of his second marriage to Phthia, the daughter of Olympias, and retired to Syria. Here she in vain incited her nephew Seleucus II Callinicus
Seleucus II Callinicus
(246–225 BC) to avenge the insult offered her by declaring war against the Macedonian king
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Echecrates
In ancient Greece, Echecrates (Greek: Ἐχεκράτης) was the name of the following men: Echecrates of Thessaly, a military officer of Ptolemy IV Philopator, documented around 219–217 BC. A son of Demetrius the Fair
Demetrius the Fair
(c. 285–250 BC) by Olympias of Larissa, and brother of Antigonus III Doson. He had a son named Antigonus after his uncle.[1] Three Pythagorean philosophers mentioned by Iamblichus:[2]A Locrian, one of those to whom Plato
Plato
is said to have gone for instruction.[3] The name Caetus in Valerius Maximus[4] is perhaps an erroneous reading for Echecrates. A Tarentine, probably the same who is mentioned in Plato's Ninth Letter. Echecrates of Phlius, a contemporary with Aristoxenus
Aristoxenus
the Peripatetic.[5]References[edit]^ Liv. xl. 54; see vol. i. pp. 187, 189, b. ^ Vit. Pyth. ad fin. ^ Cic. de Fin. v. 29. ^ viii. 7, Ext
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Berenice II
Berenice II (267 or 266 BC – 221 BC) was a ruling queen of Cyrene by birth, and a queen and co-regent of Egypt
Egypt
by marriage to her cousin Ptolemy III
Ptolemy III
Euergetes, the third ruler of the Ptolemaic dynasty
Ptolemaic dynasty
of Egypt.Contents1 Life1.1 Queen of Cyrene 1.2 Queen of Egypt2 Issue 3 Myths 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit]Queen Berenice II of EgyptShe was the daughter of Magas of Cyrene
Magas of Cyrene
and Queen Apama II. She was the grand-daughter of Berenice I. Queen of Cyrene[edit] In approximately 249 BC, her father died, making Berenice ruling queen of Cyrene. Soon after her father died, Berenice was married to Demetrius the Fair, a Macedonian prince. Berenice had no children with Demetrius.[1] After Demetrius came to Cyrene, he became the lover of her mother, Apama
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Stratonice Of Syria
Stratonice (Greek: Στρατoνίκη) of Syria was Queen of the Seleucid Empire
Seleucid Empire
from 300 BC until 294 BC.Contents1 Biography 2 Stratonice's children 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksBiography[edit] Stratonice (Greek: Στρατoνίκη) of Syria was the daughter of king Demetrius Poliorcetes and Phila, the daughter of Antipater
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Phila (daughter Of Seleucus)
Phila (Greek: Φίλα) a daughter of Seleucus I Nicator
Seleucus I Nicator
and Stratonice. She became the wife of Antigonus II Gonatas
Antigonus II Gonatas
and was mother of Demetrius II Aetolicus.[1][2] References[edit]^ Joann Malelas, p. 198, ed. Bonn ; Droysen, Hellenism. vol. ii. p. 179 ; Froelich. Ann
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Aeacides Of Epirus
Aeacides (Greek: Aἰακίδης; died 313 BC), king of Epirus (331-316, 313), was a son of king Arymbas and grandson of king Alcetas I.Contents1 Family 2 Reign 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksFamily[edit] Aeacides married Phthia, the daughter of Menon of Pharsalus, by whom he had the celebrated son Pyrrhus and two daughters, Deidamia and Troias. Reign[edit] Aeacides succeeded to the throne of Epirus
Epirus
on the death of his cousin Alexander, who was slain in Italy.[1] In 317 he assisted Polyperchon in restoring his cousin Olympias
Olympias
and the five-year-old king Alexander IV (mother and son of Alexander the Great), to Macedonia. In the following year he marched to the assistance of Olympias, who was hard pressed by Cassander; but the Epirots disliked the service, rose against Aeacides, and drove him from the kingdom
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Lanassa (wife Of Pyrrhus)
Lanassa was a daughter of king Agathocles of Syracuse, Sicily, perhaps by his second wife Alcia. In 295 BC Agathocles married Lanassa to King Pyrrhus of Epirus. Agathocles himself escorted his daughter with his fleet to Epirus to her groom. Lanassa brought the island of Corcyra
Corcyra
as dowry into the marriage.[1] The couple had two sons: Alexander and Helenus.[2] However, Lanassa could not accept her husband's polygamous lifestyle, and so she left Pyrrhus in 291 BC, went to Corcyra, and offered this island as dowry to Demetrius I Poliorcetes, then king of Macedonia, if he would become her new husband. The courted diadoch came to Corcyra, married Lanassa and occupied the island.[3] After the death of Agathocles (289 BC) Pyrrhus, as former husband of Lanassa, asserted hereditary claims to Sicily. On the basis of these claims the inhabitants of Syracuse asked Pyrrhus in 279 BC for assistance against Carthage.[4] References[edit]Felix Stähelin: Lanassa 2)
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Deidamia I Of Epirus
Deidamia (in Greek Δηιδάμεια; died 300 BC) was a Princess of Epirus.Contents1 Family 2 Life 3 References 4 NotesFamily[edit] Deidamia was a daughter of Aeacides, king of Epirus and his wife, Queen Phthia, and sister of King Pyrrhus. While yet a girl she was betrothed by her father to Alexander IV, the son of Roxana and Alexander the Great, and having accompanied that prince and Olympias into Macedonia, was besieged in Pydna (316 BC) together with them.[1] Life[edit] After the death of Alexander and Roxana in 309 BC, she was married to Demetrius Poliorcetes, at the time when the latter was endeavouring to establish his power in Greece, and thus became a bond of union between him and Pyrrhus.[2]Deidamia's husband, DemetriusWhen Demetrius proceeded to Asia to support his father Antigonus against the confederate kings, he left Deidamia at Athens; but after his defeat at Ipsus (301 BC), the Athenians sent her away to Megara, though still treating her with regal honours
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