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Annie (musical)
Annie
Annie
is a Broadway musical based upon the popular Harold Gray
Harold Gray
comic strip Little Orphan Annie, with music by Charles Strouse, lyrics by Martin Charnin, and book by Thomas Meehan. The original Broadway production opened in 1977 and ran for nearly six years, setting a record for the Alvin Theatre
Alvin Theatre
(now the Neil Simon Theatre).[1] It spawned numerous productions in many countries, as well as national tours, and won the Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Musical
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Sweatshop
Sweatshop
Sweatshop
(or sweat factory) is a pejorative term for a workplace that has very poor, socially unacceptable working conditions. The work may be difficult, dangerous, climatically challenged or underpaid. Workers in sweatshops may work long hours with low pay, regardless of laws mandating overtime pay or a minimum wage; child labor laws may also be violated. The Fair Labor Association's "2006 Annual Public Report" inspected factories for FLA compliance in 18 countries including Bangladesh, El Salvador, Colombia, Guatemala, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, China, India, Vietnam, Honduras, Indonesia, Brazil, Taiwan, Mexico, and the U.S.[1] The U.S
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Tiffany & Co.
Tiffany & Company (known colloquially as Tiffany or Tiffany's) is an American luxury jewelry and specialty retailer, headquartered in New York City.[2] Tiffany sells jewelry, sterling silver, china, crystal, stationery, fragrances, water bottles, watches, personal accessories, as well as some leather goods.[3] Many of these goods are sold at Tiffany stores, as well as through direct-mail and corporate merchandising. Tiffany is renowned for its luxury goods and is particularly known for its diamond and sterling silver jewelry. Tiffany markets itself as an arbiter of taste and style,[4] and was once a purveyor to the Russian imperial family.[citation needed]Contents1 History1.1 Establishment 1.2 "Blue Book" and the Civil War 1.3 "Gilded Age" 1.4 1900–1999 1.5 2000–present1.5.1 United States
United States
V
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Franklin D. Roosevelt
Governor of New York GovernorshipPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst Term1932 campaignElection1st Inauguration First 100 daysNew Deal Glass-Steagall Act WPA Social Security SEC Fireside ChatsSecond Term1936 campaignElection2nd InaugurationSupreme Court Packing National Recovery Act 1937 Recession March of Dimes Pre-war foreign policyThird Term1940 campaignElection3rd InaugurationWorld War IIWorld War IIAttack on Pearl Harbor Infamy Speech Atlantic Charter Japanese Internment Tehran Conference United Nations D-DaySecond Bill of Rights G.I
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Dog Catcher
An animal control service or animal control agency is an entity charged with responding to requests for help with animals ranging from wild animals, dangerous animals, or animals in distress. An individual who works for such an entity was once known as a dog catcher, but is generally now called an animal control officer, and may be an employee or a contractor – commonly employed by a municipalities, county, shire[1], or other subnational government area.Contents1 Duties and function 2 Politics 3 References 4 External linksDuties and function[edit]ASPCA Humane Law Enforcement Division patch Animal
Animal
control services may be provided by the government or through a contract with a humane society or society for the prevention of cruelty to animals
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Louis Brandeis
Louis Dembitz Brandeis (/ˈbrændaɪs/; November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American lawyer and associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States
Supreme Court of the United States
from 1916 to 1939. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, to Jewish immigrant parents from Bohemia
Bohemia
(now in the Czech Republic), who raised him in a secular home. He attended Harvard Law School, graduating at the age of twenty with what is widely rumored as the highest grade average in the law school's history
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United States Secret Service
The United States Secret Service
United States Secret Service
("USSS" or "Secret Service") is a federal law enforcement agency under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, charged with conducting criminal investigations and protecting the nation's leaders.[2] Until 2003, the Service was part of the U.S. Department of the Treasury, as the agency was originally founded to combat the then-widespread counterfeiting of U.S. currency.[3] The U.S. Secret Service
U.S. Secret Service
is tasked with two distinct and critical national security missions:Investigative Mission – The investigative mission of the USSS is to safeguard the payment and financial systems of the United States from a wide range of financial and electronic-based crimes. Financial investigations include counterfeit U.S. currency, bank & financial institution fraud, mail fraud, wire fraud, illicit financing operations, and major conspiracies
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Ventriloquist
Ventriloquism, or ventriloquy, is an act of stagecraft in which a person (a ventriloquist) changes his or her voice so that it appears that the voice is coming from elsewhere, usually a puppeteered "dummy". The act of ventriloquism is ventriloquizing, and the ability to do so is commonly called in English the ability to "throw" one's voice.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Emergence as entertainment2 Making the right sounds 3 Ventriloquist's dummy 4 Fear of ventriloquist's dummies 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] Originally, ventriloquism was a religious practice.[1] The name comes from the Latin for to speak from the stomach, i.e. venter (belly) and loqui (speak).[2] The Greeks called this gastromancy (Greek: εγγαστριμυθία). The noises produced by the stomach were thought to be the voices of the unliving, who took up residence in the stomach of the ventriloquist
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Frances Perkins
Frances Perkins
Frances Perkins
(born Fannie Coralie Perkins; April 10, 1880[1][2] – May 14, 1965) was an American sociologist and workers-rights advocate who served as the U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945, the longest serving in that position, and the first woman appointed to the U.S. Cabinet. As a loyal supporter of her friend, Franklin D. Roosevelt, she helped pull the labor movement into the New Deal
New Deal
coalition. She and Interior Secretary Harold L. Ickes were the only original members of the Roosevelt cabinet to remain in office for his entire presidency. During her term as Secretary of Labor, Perkins executed many aspects of the New Deal, including the Civilian Conservation Corps, the Public Works Administration and its successor the Federal Works Agency, and the labor portion of the National Industrial Recovery Act
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Louis Howe
Louis McHenry Howe (January 14, 1871 – April 18, 1936)[1] was an American reporter for the New York Herald
New York Herald
best known for acting as an early political advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Born to a wealthy family in Indianapolis, Indiana, Howe was a small, sickly, and asthmatic child. The family moved to Saratoga, New York after serious financial losses. Howe married Grace Hartley and became a journalist with a small paper that his father purchased. He spent the next decade freelancing for the New York Herald
New York Herald
and working various jobs. Howe was then was assigned to cover the New York state legislature in 1906, and soon became a political operative for Thomas Mott Osborne, a Democratic opponent of the Tammany Hall
Tammany Hall
political machine. After Osborne fired Howe in 1909, Howe attached himself to rising Democratic star Franklin D
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Henry Morgenthau Jr.
Henry Morgenthau Jr.
Henry Morgenthau Jr.
(/ˈmɔːrɡənθɔː/; May 11, 1891 – February 6, 1967) was the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury
U.S. Secretary of the Treasury
during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt. He played a major role in designing and financing the New Deal. After 1937, while still in charge of the Treasury, he played the central role in financing US participation in World War II.[1] He also played an increasingly major role in shaping foreign policy, especially with respect to Lend Lease, support for China, helping Jewish refugees, and proposing (in the "Morgenthau Plan") to prevent Germany from again being a military threat by wrecking its industry and mines.[2] Morgenthau was the father of Robert M. Morgenthau, who was District Attorney of Manhattan
Manhattan
for 35 years and Henry Morgenthau III, an American author and television producer
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Depression (mood)
Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity that can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, feelings, and sense of well-being. A depressed mood is a normal temporary reaction to life events such as loss of a loved one. It is also a symptom of some physical diseases and a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments. Depressed mood is also a symptom of some mood disorders such as major depressive disorder or dysthymia.[1] People with a depressed mood may be notably sad, anxious, or empty; they may also feel notably hopeless, helpless, dejected, or worthless. Other symptoms expressed may include senses of guilt, irritability, or anger.[2][3] Further feelings expressed by these individuals may include feeling ashamed or an expressed restlessness. These individuals may notably lose interest in activities that they once considered pleasurable or experience either loss of appetite or overeating
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Richard Nixon
Vice President of the United StatesMotorcade attack Kitchen Debate Operation 40 1960 presidential electionPost-vice presidency1962 gubernatorial bid "Last press conference"President of the United StatesPresidencyFirst term1968 presidential electioncampaign1st InaugurationNixon Doctrine War policy Visit to ChinaNixonomicsNixon shockEPA Environmental policy Clean Water NOAA War on Cancer War on DrugsSecond term1972 presidential electionConvention2nd InaugurationDétente Paris Peace Accords Endangered Species Act Watergate scandalTimeline Tapes United States
United States
v. NixonWatergate Committee Impeachment
Impeachment
processSpeechPost-presidencyPardon The Nixon Interviews Nixon v
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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