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Anna Karenina
Anna Karenina
Anna Karenina
(Russian: «Анна Каренина», IPA: [ˈanːə kɐˈrʲenʲɪnə])[1] is a novel by the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, published in serial installments from 1873 to 1877 in the periodical The Russian Messenger. Tolstoy clashed with editor Mikhail Katkov
Mikhail Katkov
over political issues that arose in the final installment (Tolstoy's negative views of Russian volunteers going to fight in Serbia); therefore, the novel's first complete appearance was in book form in 1878. Widely regarded as a pinnacle in realist fiction, Tolstoy considered Anna Karenina
Anna Karenina
his first true novel, after he came to consider War and Peace to be more than a novel
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Modernist Literature
Literary modernism, or modernist literature, has its origins in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, mainly in Europe
Europe
and North America, and is characterized by a very self-conscious break with traditional ways of writing, in both poetry and prose fiction. Modernists experimented with literary form and expression, as exemplified by Ezra Pound's maxim to "Make it new."[1] This literary movement was driven by a conscious desire to overturn traditional modes of representation and express the new sensibilities of their time.[2] The horrors of the
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Spring (hydrosphere)
A spring is any natural situation where water flows from an aquifer to the Earth's surface. It is a component of the hydrosphere.Contents1 Formation1.1 Types2 Flow2.1 Classification3 Water
Water
content 4 Uses4.1 Sacred springs5 Notable springs 6 See also 7 References7.1 Citations 7.2 Further reading8 External linksFormation[edit]A natural spring on Mackinac Island
Mackinac Island
in MichiganA spring may be the result of karst topography where surface water has infiltrated the Earth's surface (recharge area), becoming part of the area groundwater. The groundwater then travels through a network of cracks and fissure—openings ranging from intergranular spaces to large caves
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Aristocracy (class)
The aristocracy is a social class that a particular society considers its highest order. In many states, the aristocracy included the upper class of people (aristocrats) with hereditary rank and titles. In some—such as ancient Greece, Rome and India—aristocratic status came from belonging to a military caste, although it has also been common, notably in African societies, for aristocrats to belong to priestly dynasties. Aristocratic status can involve feudal or legal privileges.[1] They are usually below only the monarch of a country or nation in its social hierarchy
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Jealous
Jealousy
Jealousy
is an emotion; the term generally refers to the thoughts or feelings of insecurity, fear, concern, and envy over relative lack of possessions, status or something of great personal value, particularly in reference to a comparator.[citation needed] Jealousy
Jealousy
often consists of one or more of emotions such as anger, resentment, inadequacy, helplessness or disgust
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Debutante
A debutante or deb (from the French débutante, "female beginner") is a girl or young woman of an aristocratic or upper-class family who has reached maturity and, as a new adult, comes out into society at a formal "debut". Originally, the term meant the woman was old enough to be married, and part of the purpose of her coming out was to display her to eligible bachelors and their families with a view to marriage within a select circle.Contents1 Australia 2 United Kingdom 3 United States3.1 American debutante balls 3.2 Debutante
Debutante
balls in US television and films4 Latin America 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksAustralia[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Spa
A spa is a location where mineral-rich spring water (and sometimes seawater) is used to give medicinal baths. Spa
Spa
towns or spa resorts (including hot springs resorts) typically offer various health treatments, which are also known as balneotherapy. The belief in the curative powers of mineral waters goes back to prehistoric times. Such practices have been popular worldwide, but are especially widespread in Europe and Japan
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Equestrianism
Equestrianism
Equestrianism
(from Latin
Latin
equester, equestr-, equus, horseman, horse),[1] more often known as riding, horse riding (British English) or horseback riding (American English),[2] refers to the skill of riding, driving, steeplechasing or vaulting with horses
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Steeplechase
A steeplechase is a distance horse race in which competitors are required to jump diverse fence and ditch obstacles. Steeplechasing is primarily conducted in Ireland
Ireland
(where it originated), the United Kingdom, Canada, United States, Australia
Australia
and France. The name is derived from early races in which orientation of the course was by reference to a church steeple, jumping fences and ditches and generally traversing the many intervening obstacles in the countryside. Modern usage of the term "steeplechase" differs between countries. In Ireland
Ireland
and the United Kingdom, it refers only to races run over large, fixed obstacles, in contrast to "hurdle" races where the obstacles are much smaller. The collective term "jump racing" or "National Hunt racing" is used when referring to steeplechases and hurdle races collectively (although, properly speaking, National Hunt racing also includes some flat races)
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Mare
A mare is an adult female horse or other equine.[1] In most cases, a mare is a female horse over the age of three, and a filly is a female horse three and younger. In Thoroughbred
Thoroughbred
horse racing, a mare is defined as a female horse more than four years old. The word can also be used for other female equine animals, particularly mules and zebras, but a female donkey is usually called a "jenny". A broodmare is a mare used for breeding. A horse's female parent is known as its dam. An uncastrated adult male horse is called a stallion and a castrated male is a gelding. Occasionally, the term "horse" is used to designate only a male horse.Contents1 Reproductive cycle 2 Behavior 3 Uses3.1 Historic use4 Etymology 5 See also 6 ReferencesReproductive cycle[edit]A nursing foal
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Pietist
Pietism
Pietism
(/ˈpaɪ.ɪtɪsm/, from the word piety) was an influential movement in Lutheranism
Lutheranism
that combined its emphasis on Biblical doctrine with the Reformed emphasis on individual piety and living a vigorous Christian life.[1] Although the movement was active exclusively within Lutheranism, it had a tremendous impact on Protestantism
Protestantism
worldwide, particularly in North America and Europe. Pietism
Pietism
originated in modern Germany
Germany
in the late 17th century with the work of Philipp Spener, a Lutheran theologian whose emphasis on personal transformation through spiritual rebirth and renewal, individual devotion and piety laid the foundations for the movement
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Hospital
A hospital is a health care institution providing patient treatment with specialized medical and nursing staff and medical equipment.[1] The best-known type of hospital is the general hospital, which typically has an emergency department to treat urgent health problems ranging from fire and accident victims to a heart attack. A district hospital typically is the major health care facility in its region, with large numbers of beds for intensive care and additional beds for patients who need long-term care. Specialised hospitals include trauma centres, rehabilitation hospitals, children's hospitals, seniors' (geriatric) hospitals, and hospitals for dealing with specific medical needs such as psychiatric treatment (see psychiatric hospital) and certain disease categories. Specialised hospitals can help reduce health care costs compared to general hospitals.[2] A teaching hospital combines assistance to people with teaching to medical students and nurses
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National Museum, Warsaw
Tram: 7, 8, 9,22, 24, 25 Bus: 111, 117,158, 507, 517, 521 (Muzeum Narodowe) 116, 128, 195, 180, 222, 503 (Foksal)[1]Website www.mnw.art.plThe National Museum in Warsaw
Warsaw
(Polish: Muzeum Narodowe w Warszawie), popularly abbreviated as MNW, is a national museum in Warsaw, one of the largest museums in Poland
Poland
and the largest in the capital
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Warsaw
From top, left to right: Warsaw
Warsaw
Skyline Royal Baths Park Royal Route Staszic Palace
Staszic Palace
and Copernicus Monument Warsaw
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Agriculture
Agriculture
Agriculture
is the cultivation and breeding of animals and plants to provide food, fiber, medicinal plants and other products to sustain and enhance life.[1] Agriculture
Agriculture
was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The study of agriculture is known as agricultural science. The history of agriculture dates back thousands of years; people gathered wild grains at least 105,000 years ago, and began to plant them around 11,500 years ago, before they became domesticated. Pigs, sheep, and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Crops originate from at least 11 regions of the world
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Peasant
A peasant is a pre-industrial agricultural laborer or farmer, especially one living in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
under feudalism and paying rent, tax, fees or services to a landlord.[1][2] In Europe, peasants were divided into three classes according to their personal status: slave, serf, and free tenant. Peasants either hold title to land in fee simple, or hold land by any of several forms of land tenure, among them socage, quit-rent, leasehold, and copyhold.[3] The word "peasant" is—and long has been—often used pejoratively to refer to poor or landless farmers and agricultural workers, especially in the poorer countries of the world in which the agricultural labor force makes up a large percentage of the population
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