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Anna Clemenc
Anna "Big Annie" Klobuchar Clemenc[a] (March 2, 1888 – July 27, 1956; pronounced "Clements"[4]) was an American labor activist. Born in Calumet, Michigan, she founded and served as president of the local Women's Auxiliary No. 15 of the Western Federation of Miners
Western Federation of Miners
and was an active participant in the Copper Country
Copper Country
Strike of 1913–1914. She is an inducted member of the Michigan Women's Hall of Fame.Contents1 Biography1.1 Education 1.2 First marriage 1.3 Labor activism1.3.1 Italian Hall
Italian Hall
disaster1.4 Second marriage and daughter2 Legacy 3 Notes 4 References 5 Works cited 6 External linksBiography[edit] Clemenc was born in 1888 in Calumet, Michigan, to George and Mary (née Adam) Klobuchar, the eldest of five children.[5] In 1890 or 1891, the family returned to Slovenia, where the youngest Klobuchar sibling, Mary, was born February 2, 1892
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Calumet, Michigan
Calumet (/ˌkæljuːˈmɛt/ KAL-yoo-MET) is a village in Calumet Township, Houghton County, in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Michigan's Upper Peninsula, that was once at the center of the mining industry of the Upper Peninsula. Also known as Red Jacket, the village includes the Calumet Downtown Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The village may itself be included within the Calumet Historic District, a larger area which is NRHP-listed and which is a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
District. It is bordered on the north by Calumet Township, on the south by the unincorporated town of New Town and Blue Jacket,[6][7] on the east by Blue Jacket and Calumet Township, and on the west by Yellow Jacket and Calumet Township. The population was 726 at the 2010 census
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Michigan House Of Representatives
Majority     Republican (63)Minority     Democratic (47)Length of term2 yearsAuthority Article IV, Section 3, Michigan ConstitutionSalary $71,865/year + expensesElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016 (110 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (110 seats)Redistricting Legislative ControlMeeting placeHouse of Representatives Chamber Michigan State Capitol Lansing, MichiganWebsiteMichigan House of RepresentativesThe Michigan House of Representatives
Michigan House of Representatives
is the lower house of the Michigan Legislature. There are 110 members, each of whom is elected from constituencies having approximately 77,000 to 91,000 residents, based on population figures from the 2010 U.S. Census
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Bertha Van Hoosen
Bertha Van Hoosen (March 26, 1863 – June 7, 1952) was the first president and one of the founders of the American Medical Women's Association in 1915.[1] In 1918, Van Hoosen was the first woman to be head of a medical division at Loyola University Medical School, a coeducational university. She published an autobiography of her medical role and took an interest in women's health issues. Early life[edit] Bertha Van Hoosen grew up in Stony Creek, Michigan on her parent's farm. She went to many public schools, and at the age of 17, graduated high school in Pontiac, Michigan. Dr. Van Hoosen strived to become a surgeon, however, her parents did not support her career choices and did not help her fund her education. As a result, she took various jobs around the area in order to pay for her education.[2] In 1884, she received her bachelor's degree from the University of Michigan and enrolled in the medical department. She worked as a teacher and nurse
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Icie Macy Hoobler
Icie Gertrude Macy Hoobler (July 23, 1892 – January 6, 1984)[1][2] was an American biochemist who did research in human nutrition, specifically pertaining to mothers and children. Despite facing discrimination because of her gender, she became the first woman chair of a local section of the American Chemical Society
American Chemical Society
and won 22 awards and honors for her laboratory's research.[3]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Honors 4 Personal life 5 References 6 Further readingEarly life and education[edit] Hoobler grew up on a farm in Gallatin, Missouri
Gallatin, Missouri
where she became interested in science from watching the maturation of animals and spending time roaming around her family's property
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Sojourner Truth
A sojourner is a person who resides temporarily in a place. Sojourner may also refer to: Sojourner Truth (1797-1883), abolitionist and women's rights activist Mike Sojourner (born 1953), American retired National Basketball League player Willie Sojourner (1943-2005), ba
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Lucinda Hinsdale Stone
Lucinda Hinsdale Stone (1814 – March 14, 1900) was an early American feminist and educator. Stone advocated for women’s voting rights and educational opportunities, in addition to abolition.[1] Lucinda Hinsdale Stone’s husband, James Andrus Blinn Stone served as the first president of Kalamazoo College
Kalamazoo College
from 1843 to 1863[2]. During this time, Lucinda Hinsdale Stone led the college’s Ladies Department.[3] Both Stones promoted abolition, co-education, and women’s rights[4]. In 1983, Lucinda Hinsdale Stone was recognized for her efforts in advancing the cause of women’s rights through induction into the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame[5]
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Helen W. Milliken
Helen Wallbank Milliken (December 4, 1922[1] – November 16, 2012) was an American women's rights activist, environmentalist, and former First Lady
First Lady
of Michigan. Milliken, the longest serving First Lady
First Lady
in Michigan's history, served from 1969 to 1983 during the tenure of her husband, former Michigan
Michigan
Governor William Milliken. Milliken was known for her activism on behalf of many causes throughout her life. She was one of Michigan's leading proponents of the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the United States
United States
Constitution during the 1970s.[1][2]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 First Lady
First Lady
of Michigan 1.3 Post-statehouse2 ReferencesBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Milliken was born Helen Wallbank on December 4, 1922, in Colorado[1] to Stanley and Nellie (née Sillik) Wallbank, the second of four children
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Western Federation Of Miners
The Western Federation of Miners
Western Federation of Miners
(WFM) was a radical labor union that gained a reputation for militancy in the mines of the western United States and British Columbia. Its efforts to organize both hard rock miners and smelter workers brought it into sharp conflicts – and often pitched battles – with both employers and governmental authorities. One of the most dramatic of these struggles occurred in the Cripple Creek district in 1903–04, and has been called the Colorado
Colorado
Labor Wars
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American Heritage (magazine)
American Heritage is a magazine dedicated to covering the history of the United States
United States
of America for a mainstream readership. Until 2007, the magazine was published by Forbes.[1] Since that time, Edwin S. Grosvenor has been its publisher.[2] Print publication was suspended early in 2013,[3] but the magazine relaunched in digital format with the Summer 2017 issue[4] after a Kickstarter campaign raised $31,203 from 587 backers.[5][6] The publisher stated it also intended to relaunch the magazine's sister publication Invention & Technology, which ceased print publication in 2011.Contents1 History 2 Contents 3 Editors 4 Notable staff and contributors 5 Awards5.1 Samuel Eliot Morison
Samuel Eliot Morison
Award6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] From 1947 to 1949 the American Association for State and Local History published a house organ, American Heritage: A Journal of Community History
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The Day Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Michigan State Capitol
The Michigan
Michigan
State Capitol is the building that houses the legislative branch of the government of the U.S. state of Michigan. It is in the portion of the state capital of Lansing
Lansing
which lies in Ingham County. The present structure, at the intersection of Capitol and Michigan Avenues, is a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
that houses the chambers and offices of the Michigan
Michigan
Legislature as well as the ceremonial offices of the Governor of Michigan
Michigan
and Lieutenant Governor
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Patricia Hill Burnett
Patricia Hill Burnett (5 September 1920 - 29 December 2014), born Patricia Hill, was an American portrait artist and women's rights activist. She was nominated to the Michigan Women's Hall of Fame
Michigan Women's Hall of Fame
in 1987.[1][2][3]Contents1 Life and education1.1 Career and activism2 Honors 3 ReferencesLife and education[edit] Patricia was born in 1920 in Brooklyn, New York.[1] When she was a baby, her parents separated, and she lived with her mother. They lived in Toledo, Ohio. Later, her mother married a physician who worked at Henry Ford Hospital, and the family moved to Detroit, Michigan.[1][4][5][6] Patricia was Miss Michigan, and also was a runner up to Miss America
Miss America
in 1942
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Joan Of Arc
Hundred Years War Loire
Loire
Campaign:Siege of Orléans Battle
Battle
of Jargeau Battle
Battle
of Meung-sur-Loire Battle
Battle
of Beaugency Battle
Battle
of PatayMarch to Reims Siege of Paris Siege of La Charité Siege of CompiègneSignature Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
(French: Jeanne d'Arc,[5] IPA: [ʒan daʁk]; 6 January c. 1412[6] – 30 May 1431), nicknamed "The Maid of Orléans" (French: La Pucelle d'Orléans), is considered a heroine of France for her role during the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years' War and was canonized as a Roman Catholic saint. Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
was born to Jacques d'Arc
Jacques d'Arc
and Isabelle Romée, a peasant family, at Domrémy in north-east France
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