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Anglo-Indian
The term Anglo-Indian
Anglo-Indian
can refer to at least two groups of people: those with mixed Indian and British (specifically English) ancestry, and people of British/English descent born or living in India. The latter sense is now mainly historical,[4][5] but confusions can arise. The Oxford English Dictionary, for example, gives three possibilities: "Of mixed British and Indian parentage, of Indian descent but born or living in Britain or (chiefly historical) of English descent or birth but living or having lived long in India".[6] People fitting the middle definition are more usually known as British Asian
British Asian
or British Indian
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British People
 United Kingdom 57,678,000[2] (British citizens of any race or ethnicity) British Overseas Territories 247,899[3] United States 40,234,652-72,065,000 1 678,000 2[4][5] Canada 12,134,745 1 609,000 4[6] Australia 9,031,100 1[7] 1,300,000 4[8] Hong Kong 3,400,000 3 4[9] New Zealand 2,425,278 1 217,000 4[10] South Africa 1,600,000 750,000 4[8][11] Chile 700,000 1[12] France 400,000 4[13] Ireland 291,000 4[8] Argentina 250,000 1[14] United Arab Emirates 240,000 2[15] Spain 236,669 4[16][17] Peru 150,000 1[18] Germany 115,000 2[19] Pakistan 79,447 4[20] Cyprus 59,000 2[19] Thailand 51,000 2[21]  Switzerland 45,000 2[22] Netherlands 44,000 2[22] Israel 44,000[23] Portugal 41,000 2[22] Sweden 39,989 2 China 36,0
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Hinduism
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Minority Group
A minority group refers to a category of people differentiated from the social majority, those who hold on to major of positions of social power in a society. It may be defined by law. The differentiation can be based on one or more observable human characteristics, including: ethnicity, race, religion, disability, gender, wealth, health or sexual orientation. Usage of the term is applied to various situations and civilizations within history despite its popular misassociation with a numerical, statistical minority.[1] In the social sciences, the term "minority" is sometimes used to describe social power relations between dominant and subordinate groups, rather than simply indicating demographic variation within a population.[2] Furthermore, from an intersectional sociological perspective, any given individual may simultaneously occupy both a majority identity and a minority identity, depending on the intersection of different social categories (e.g
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Macanese People
The Macanese people (Portuguese: Macaense; Chinese: 土生葡人; Jyutping: tou2-saang1 pou4-jan4; literally: "native-born Portuguese people", Cantonese: toú-saāng poùh-yàhn, or Chinese: 土生澳門人; Jyutping: tou2-saang1 ou3-mun2 jan4; literally: "native-born Macau
Macau
people") are an East Asian ethnic group that originated in
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Eurasians In Singapore
Mainly English, Portuguese, Dutch, French Also: Kristang, Chinese, Malay, Tamil and other Indian languagesReligionMainly Christianity Also: Sunni Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Sikhism, and no religionRelated ethnic groupsBritish people, Portuguese people, Kristang people, Macanese people, Dutch peoplePart of a series onEthnicity in SingaporeArabs Armenians Chinese Chitty Eurasians Filipinos Indians Japanese Jawi Peranakan Jews Koreans Malays Nepalis Pakistanis Straits-Chinese Sri Lankansv t eEurasians in Singapore
Singapore
are individuals of mixed European and Asian descent
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Kristang People
The Kristang (otherwise known as "Portuguese-Eurasians" or "Malacca Portuguese") are a creole ethnic group of people of mixed Portuguese and Malaccan descent based in Malaysia
Malaysia
and Singapore. People of this ethnicity have, besides Portuguese, a strong Dutch heritage, as well as some British, Malay, Chinese and Indian heritage due to intermarriages, which is common among the Kristang. In addition, due to the Portuguese Inquisition in the region, a lot of the Jews of Malacca
Malacca
assimilated into the Kristang community.[1] The creole group arose in Malacca
Malacca
(Malaysia) between the 16th and 17th centuries, when the city was a port and base of the Portuguese Empire. Some descendants speak a distinctive Kristang language or Malacca Portuguese, a creole based on Portuguese
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Burgher People
Burgher people, also known simply as Burghers, are a small Eurasian ethnic group in Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
descended from Portuguese, Dutch, British[2][3] and other European men who settled in Sri Lanka[4][5] and developed relationships with native Sri Lankan women.[6] The Portuguese and Dutch had held some of the maritime provinces of the island for centuries before the advent of the British Empire.[7][8][9] With the establishment of Ceylon
Ceylon
as a crown colony at the end of the 18th century, most of those who retained close ties with the Netherlands
Netherlands
departed
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Presidencies And Provinces Of British India
The Provinces of India, earlier Presidencies of British India
India
and still earlier, Presidency towns, were the administrative divisions of British governance in the subcontinent. Collectively, they were called British India. In one form or another, they existed between 1612 and 1947, conventionally divided into three historical periods:During 1612–1757, the East India Company
East India Company
set up "factories" (trading posts) in several locations, mostly in coastal India, with the consent of the Mughal emperors
Mughal emperors
or local rulers. Its rivals were the merchant trading companies of Holland and France. By the mid-18th century, three "Presidency towns": Madras, Bombay, and Calcutta
Calcutta
had grown in size. During the period of Company rule in India, 1757–1858, the Company gradually acquired sovereignty over large parts of India, now called "Presidencies"
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Indian Independence Act 1947
The Indian Independence Act 1947
Indian Independence Act 1947
(1947 c. 30 (10 & 11. Geo. 6.)) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
that partitioned British India
British India
into the two new independent dominions of India and Pakistan. The Act received the royal assent on 18 July 1947, and Pakistan
Pakistan
came into being on 14 August and India came into being on 15 August.[1] The legislation was formulated by the government of Prime Minister Clement Attlee
Clement Attlee
and the Governor General of India Lord Mountbatten, after representatives of the Indian National Congress,[2] the Muslim League,[3] and the Sikh community[4] came to an agreement with Lord Mountbatten on what has come to be known as the 3 June Plan or Mountbatten Plan
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Dravidian People
Dravidians are native speakers of any of the Dravidian languages. There are around 245 million native speakers of Dravidian languages.[2] They form the majority of the population of South India. Dravidian-speaking people are natively found in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan,[3] Nepal, Maldives, and Sri Lanka.[4] The third century BCE onwards saw the development of large Dravidian political states: Chola, Pandyan, Rashtrakuta, Vijayanagara, Chera, Chalukya and a number of smaller states. The Western Ganga, Eastern Ganga, Kadamba, Hoysala, Pallava, Kalabhra, Satavahana, Andhra Ikshvaku, Vishnukundina, Western Chalukya, Eastern Chalukya, Kakatiya, Mysore, Jaffna and the Nayakas were established by the Dravidian people. Medieval Tamil guilds and trading organisations like the "Ayyavole and Manigramam" played an important role in the Southeast Asia trade.[5] Traders and religious leaders travelled to Southeast Asia and played an important role in the cultural Indianisation of the region
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Indo-Aryan People
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
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Atheism
Atheism
Atheism
is, in the broadest sense, the absence of belief in the existence of deities.[1][2][3][4] Less broadly, atheism is the rejection of belief that any deities exist.[5][6] In an even narrower sense, atheism is specifically the position that there are no deities.[1][2][7][8] Atheism
Atheism
is contrasted with theism,[9][10] which, in its most general form, is the belief that at least one deity exists.[10][11][12] The etymological root for the word atheism originated before the 5th century BCE from the ancient Greek ἄθεος (atheos), meaning "without god(s)"
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Irreligion
Irreligion (adjective form: non-religious or irreligious) is the absence, indifference, rejection of, or hostility towards religion.[1] Irreligion may include some forms of theism, depending on the religious context it is defined against; for example, in 18th-century Europe, the epitome of irreligion was deism,[2] while in contemporary East Asia
East Asia
the shared term meaning "irreligion" or "no religion" (無宗教, Chinese pron. wú zōngjiào, Japanese pron
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Jainism
Jainism
Jainism
(/ˈdʒeɪnɪzəm/),[1] traditionally known as Jain
Jain
Dharma,[2] is an ancient Indian religion.[3] Followers of Jainism
Jainism
are called "Jains", a word derived from the Sanskrit word jina (victor) and connoting the path of victory in crossing over life's stream of rebirths through an ethical and spiritual life.[4] Jains
Jains
trace their history through a succession of twenty-four victorious saviors and teachers known as tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha, who is believed to have lived millions of years ago, and twenty-fourth being the Mahāvīra
Mahāvīra
around 500 BCE
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Sikhism
Sikhism
Sikhism
(/ˈsiːkɪzəm/; Punjabi: ਸਿੱਖੀ), or Sikhi[3] Sikkhī, pronounced [ˈsɪkːʰiː], from Sikh, meaning a "disciple", or a "learner"), is a religion that originated in the Punjab region
Pun

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