HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Andrey Nikolaevich Kolmogorov
Andrey Nikolaevich Kolmogorov (Russian: Андре́й Никола́евич Колмого́ров, IPA: [ɐnˈdrʲej nʲɪkɐˈlajɪvʲɪtɕ kəlmɐˈɡorəf] ( listen), 25 April 1903 – 20 October 1987)[4][5] was a 20th-century Soviet mathematician who made significant contributions to the mathematics of probability theory, topology, intuitionistic logic, turbulence, classical mechanics, algorithmic information theory and computational complexity.[3][2][6]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Adulthood2 Awards and honours 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Andrey Kolmogorov
Andrey Kolmogorov
was born in Tambov, about 500 kilometers south-southeast of Moscow, in 1903
[...More...]

"Andrey Nikolaevich Kolmogorov" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eastern Slavic Naming Customs
Eastern Slavic naming customs
Eastern Slavic naming customs
are the traditional ways of identifying a person by name in countries influenced by East Slavic languages (Russian, Ukrainian and Belorussian: in Russia, Belarus, Ukraine
[...More...]

"Eastern Slavic Naming Customs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Andrei Monin
Andrei Sergeevich Monin (Russian: Андре́й Серге́евич Мо́нин; 2 July 1921 – 22 September 2007) was a Russian physicist, applied mathematician, and oceanographer. Monin was known for his contributions to statistical theory of turbulence and atmospheric physics. He served as the Director of the P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology of the USSR Academy of Sciences.[1] He was instrumental in developing the Shirshov Institute into one of the largest scientific centers for ocean and earth science studies.[2] The Monin–Obukhov similarity theory and the Monin–Obukhov Length are named after Monin and Russian Academician Alexander Mikhailevich Obukhov.[3]Contents1 Life and work 2 Awards and honors 3 Books authored 4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit] Monin was born on 2 July 1921 in Moscow to S. A. Monin, an Assistant Professor of the Moscow Pedagogical Institute
[...More...]

"Andrei Monin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vladimir Mikhailovich Alekseev
Vladimir Mikhailovich Alekseev (Владимир Михайлович Алексеев, sometimes transliterated as "Alexeyev" or "Alexeev", 17 June 1932, Bykovo, Ramensky District, Moscow Oblast – 1 December 1980) was a Russian mathematician who specialized in celestial mechanics and dynamical systems.[1] He attended secondary school in Moscow at one of the special schools of mathematics affiliated with Moscow State University and participated in several mathematical olympiads. From 1950 he studied at the Faculty of Mathematics and Mechanics at the Moscow State University, where he worked as a student of Andrei Kolmogorov on the asymptotic behavior in the three-body problem of celestial mechanics. Already as an undergraduate, Alekseev proved significant new results on quasi-random motion associated with the three-body problem
[...More...]

"Vladimir Mikhailovich Alekseev" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vladimir Arnold
Vladimir Igorevich Arnold (alternative spelling Arnol'd, Russian: Влади́мир И́горевич Арно́льд, 12 June 1937 – 3 June 2010)[3][4][1] was a Soviet and Russian mathematician. While he is best known for the Kolmogorov–Arnold–Moser theorem regarding the stability of integrable systems, he made important contributions in several areas including dynamical systems theory, catastrophe theory, topology, algebraic geometry, symplectic geometry, differential equations, classical mechanics, hydrodynamics and singularity theory, including posing the ADE classification
ADE classification
problem, since his first main result—the solution of Hilbert's thirteenth problem in 1957 at the age of 19. Arnold was also known as a popularizer of mathematics
[...More...]

"Vladimir Arnold" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sergei N. Artemov
Sergei Nikolaevich Artemov (Russian: Сергей Николаевич Артемов) (born December 25, 1951) is a Russian-American researcher in logic and its applications. He currently holds the title of Distinguished Professor[1] at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York[2] where he is the founder and head of its research laboratory for logic and computation.[3][4] His research interests include proof theory and logic in computer science, optimal control and hybrid systems, automated deduction and verification, epistemology, and epistemic game theory. He is best known for his invention of logics of proofs and justifications.Contents1 Research 2 Biography 3 Academic career 4 Awards 5 Selected bibliography 6 References 7 External linksResearch[edit] In the area of proof theory, Artemov established the impossibility of finding a complete axiom system for first-order provability logic (1985) and has pioneered studies of the logic of proofs
[...More...]

"Sergei N. Artemov" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Grigory Barenblatt
Grigory Isaakovich Barenblatt (Russian: Григо́рий Исаа́кович Баренблат; born July 10, 1927) is a Russian mathematician.Contents1 Education 2 Career and research 3 Awards and honors 4 References 5 External linksEducation[edit] He graduated in 1950 from Moscow State University,[1] Department of Mechanics and Mathematics. He received his Ph.D. in 1953 from Moscow State University under the supervision of A. N. Kolmogorov.[1][2] Career and research[edit] He also received a D.Sc. from Moscow State University in 1957.[1] He is an emeritus Professor in Residence at the Department of Mathematics of the University of California, Berkeley[3] and Mathematician at Department of Mathematics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.[3] He was G. I. Taylor Professor of Fluid Mechanics at the University of Cambridge from 1992 to 1994[3] and he has been Emeritus G. I. Taylor Professor of Fluid Mechanics[3] since then
[...More...]

"Grigory Barenblatt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Roland Dobrushin
Roland Lvovich Dobrushin (Russian: Рола́нд Льво́вич Добру́шин) (July 20, 1929 – November 12, 1995) was a mathematician who made important contributions to probability theory,[1] mathematical physics,[2] and information theory.[3]Contents1 Life and work 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksLife and work[edit] Dobrushin received his Ph.D. at Moscow State University under the supervision of Andrey Kolmogorov. In statistical mechanics, he introduced (simultaneously with Lanford and Ruelle) the DLR equations for the Gibbs measure
[...More...]

"Roland Dobrushin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Eugene Dynkin
Eugene Borisovich Dynkin (Russian: Евге́ний Бори́сович Ды́нкин; 11 May 1924 – 14 November 2014) was a Soviet and American mathematician.[1] He has made contributions to the fields of probability and algebra, especially semisimple Lie groups, Lie algebras, and Markov processes. The Dynkin diagram, the Dynkin system, and Dynkin's lemma are named after him.Contents1 Biography1.1 Moscow University 1.2 USSR Academy of Sciences 1.3 Cornell 1.4 Death2 Mathematical work2.1 Lie Theory 2.2 Probability theory3 Prizes and awards 4 Publications 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksBiography[edit] Dynkin lived in Leningrad until 1935, when his family was exiled to Kazakhstan.[2] Two years later, when Dynkin was 13, his father disappeared in the Gulag.[1][2] Moscow University[edit] At the age of 16, in 1940, Dynkin was admitted to Moscow University. He avoided military service in World War II because of his poor eyesight, and received his M.S
[...More...]

"Eugene Dynkin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Israil Gelfand
Israel Moiseevich Gelfand, also written Israïl Moyseyovich Gel'fand, or Izrail M. Gelfand (Yiddish: ישראל געלפֿאַנד‎, Russian: Изра́иль Моисе́евич Гельфа́нд; 2 September [O.S. 20 August] 1913 – 5 October 2009) was a prominent Soviet mathematician. He made significant contributions to many branches of mathematics, including group theory, representation theory and functional analysis
[...More...]

"Israil Gelfand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Leonid Levin
Leonid Anatolievich Levin (/leɪ.oʊˈniːd ˈlɛvɪn/ lay-oh-NEED LEV-in; Russian: Леони́д Анато́льевич Ле́вин; Ukrainian: Леоні́д Анато́лійович Ле́він; born November 2, 1948) is a Soviet-American computer scientist. He is known for his work in randomness in computing, algorithmic complexity and intractability, average-case complexity,[1] foundations of mathematics and computer science, algorithmic probability, theory of computation, and information theory. He obtained his master's degree at Moscow University
Moscow University
in 1970 where he studied under Andrey Kolmogorov and completed the Candidate Degree academic requirements in 1972.[2] He and Stephen Cook
Stephen Cook
independently discovered the existence of NP-complete problems
[...More...]

"Leonid Levin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Per Martin-Löf
Per Erik Rutger Martin-Löf (/ˈmɑːrtɪn lɒf/;[1] Swedish: [ˈmaʈiːn ˈløːv];[2] born May 8, 1942) is a Swedish logician, philosopher, and mathematical statistician. He is internationally renowned for his work on the foundations of probability, statistics, mathematical logic, and computer science. Since the late 1970s, Martin-Löf's publications have been mainly in logic. In philosophical logic, Martin-Löf has wrestled with the philosophy of logical consequence and judgment, partly inspired by the work of Brentano, Frege, and Husserl
[...More...]

"Per Martin-Löf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sergey Nikolsky
Sergey Mikhailovich Nikolsky (Russian: Серге́й Миха́йлович Нико́льский; 30 April 1905 – 9 November 2012) was a Russian mathematician. He was born in Talitsa, which was at that time located in Perm Governorate, Russian Empire. He had been an Academician since November 28, 1972. He also had won many scientific awards. At the age of 92 he was still actively giving lectures in Moscow
Moscow
Institute of Physics and Technology. In 2005, he was only giving talks at scientific conferences, but was still working in MIPT, at the age of 100. He died on 9 November 2012, aged 107. Scientific activities[edit] Nikolsky made fundamental contributions to functional analysis, approximation of functions, quadrature formulas, enclosed functional spaces and their applications to variational solutions of partial differential equations. He created a large scientific school of functions' theory and its applications
[...More...]

"Sergey Nikolsky" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Patronymic
A patronymic, or patronym, is a component of a personal name based on the given name of one's father, grandfather (i.e., an avonymic),[1][2] or an even earlier male ancestor. A component of a name based on the name of one's mother or a female ancestor is a matronymic. Each is a means of conveying lineage. In such instances, a person is usually referred to by their given name, rather than their patronymic. Patronymics are still in use, including mandatory use, in many countries worldwide, although their use has largely been replaced by or transformed into patronymic surnames
[...More...]

"Patronymic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Alexander Obukhov
Alexander Mikhailovich Obukhov (Russian: Алекса́ндр Миха́йлович Обу́хов) (5 May 1918 – 3 December 1989) was a Russian physicist and applied mathematician known for his contributions to statistical theory of turbulence and atmospheric physics. He was one of the founders of modern boundary layer meteorology.[1] He served as the Head of the theoretical department at Sternberg Astronomical Institute, a division of Moscow State University.[2] Obukhov’s 1946 fundamental paper on a universal length scale for exchange processes in the surface layer was the basis for the derivation of the Monin–Obukhov similarity theory in 1954.[3][4] The Monin–Obukhov similarity theory and the Monin–Obukhov Length are named after him and Russian Academician Andrei Monin.[5] Early life and education[edit] Obukhov was born on 5 May 1918 in Saratov, a city situated in the Volga's drainage basin
[...More...]

"Alexander Obukhov" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Yakov Sinai
Yakov Grigorevich Sinai (Russian: Я́ков Григо́рьевич Сина́й; born September 21, 1935) is a mathematician known for his work on dynamical systems
[...More...]

"Yakov Sinai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.